Free read » The Fabulous Fibonacci Numbers Å PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free



10 thoughts on “The Fabulous Fibonacci Numbers

  1. says:

    Every book rating is subjective I have no doubt that somewhere out are people who would love this book I thought it was okay but found myself unable to read it in any detail I skimmed or skipped over a fair bit of material simply because I couldn't get my brain engaged with itHere's the trouble it's a math book I'm pretty good with math and have been known to play with numbers and formulae from time to time just for the fun of it But these days I don't seem to have the mental stamina for reading math Reading math isn't like reading text at least not for those of us who don't do it all the time For most of us it takes considerable concentration It's real workThe authors are clearly in love with their subject and really really want readers to fall in love with it too but they are mathematicians and present the subject like mathematicians rather than popularizers Result? A lot of math And that's okay for readers who are into it but I'm afraid that most people just aren't going to want to go there Even some of us who are technically capable of going there might decide to take a passOn a side note its rather ironic that my wife put this book into my hands during a trip to the library well after my first novel The Fibonacci Murders had been released By then it was too late to serve as research material Oh well


  2. says:

    This turned out to be a difficult read when it was expected to be a fun romp through one very important branch of mathematics Based on the write ups I had expected to be able to follow along with the theory of Fibonacci numbers and then dive into the joy of its application across the spectrum Instead I kept getting bogged down with proofs and explanations which is ironic since the author freuently states that the proofs are in Appendices Even the applications were heaped with mathematical theory and proofsI am not math dumb in fact made a career in financial structuring which reuired a fairly high level of math Yet I was many times while reading this book left mired in proofs which started to get annoying


  3. says:

    Nice look into the Fibonacci numbers the first part did a good job explaining the history behind the Fibonacci numbers as well as explaining the relationship with Pascal's triangle the golden section and Lucas' numbersI did like the fact that the authors stressed that Fibonacci numbers were not found every where contrary to what other reviews state and that not all relationships in nature are described by them and that they were emphasizing the instances in which they do occur So it's not your regular crackpot book on Fibonacci numbersThese authors have other good books on popular math but this one failed to captivate me It was not as entertaining as other books I've read Yes as many others have mentioned previously you need than basic math but not beyond high school mathThe authors intent was to introduce some basic number theory I would recommend it as a general and gentle intro to number theory


  4. says:

    Excellent overview for all things Fibonacci I read it during a trip to Italy and made it to his grave which was not planned but a nice coincidence In other words fairly easy readingThe first several chapters are key The rest is a bit lighter And the authors certinaly are Fibonacci cheerleaders which was a little annoying to me at times They hoped to be infectiousI still personally have problems with putting a golden rectangle over part of a painting and claiming the artist planned it that way Multiple golden rectangles over all key parts of the painting I might be convinced Don't recall seeing that But the golden rectangle is certainly pleasing to the eye So my money is with the artist stumbling across it


  5. says:

    I couldn't get past page 30 and I am a math person I found the book boring and missing many justification for what the author was looking at Though the proofs are in the back of the book they are not detailed enough unless you are fluent in number theory and then they are obvious I didn't read far enough to see if Posamentier talked about all of the numbers in nature that are NOT Fibonacci numbers selective omission? While the series is interesting I think you can find patterns and meaning in just about anything if you try hard enough eg Bible code Nostradamus Mayan astronomyI suggest a book about fractals instead


  6. says:

    I’ve read a lot of books on Fibonacci numbers the Golden Ratio and the mathematical constant phi and this is book offers a good summary of what is known The chapter on Fibonacci numbers in nature is a good summary about what you would expect but the chapter on Fibonacci numbers in art and architecture is one of the best I’ve seen The chapter on fractals is good and not common in these books Some of the math is beyond most laymen and me but I guess if you are reading this book you are into math in the first place


  7. says:

    Here's a fascinating read about a character we hardly know even though his name is famous


  8. says:

    The fascinating Fibonacci series


  9. says:

    Amazingly inspiring and wonderfully eye opening Math showing the wonders of God's creation


  10. says:

    Really engaging and thought provoking


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The Fabulous Fibonacci Numbers

Free download The Fabulous Fibonacci Numbers

The most ubiuitous and perhaps the most intriguing number pattern in mathematics is the Fibonacci seuence In this simple pattern beginning with two ones each succeeding number is the sum of the two numbers immediately preceding it 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 ad infinitum Far from being just a curiosity this seuence recurs in structures found throughout nature from the arrangement of whorls on a pinecone to the branches of certain plant stems All of which is astounding evidence for the deep mathematical basis of the natural world With admirable. This turned out to be a difficult read when it was expected to be a fun romp through one very important branch of mathematics Based on the write ups I had expected to be able to follow along with the theory of Fibonacci numbers and then dive into the joy of its application across the spectrum Instead I kept getting bogged down with proofs and explanations which is ironic since the author freuently states that the proofs are in Appendices Even the applications were heaped with mathematical theory and proofsI am not math dumb in fact made a career in financial structuring which reuired a fairly high level of math Yet I was many times while reading this book left mired in proofs which started to get annoying On the Dark Side of the Moon: A Journey Toward Recovery very important branch of mathematics Based on the write ups I had expected to be able to follow along with the theory of Fibonacci numbers and then dive into the joy of its application across the spectrum Instead I kept getting bogged down with proofs and explanations which is ironic since the author freuently states that the proofs are in Appendices Even the applications were heaped with mathematical theory and proofsI am not math dumb in fact made a career in financial structuring which reuired a fairly high level of math Yet I was many times while reading this book left mired in proofs which started to get annoying

Download é PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ½ Alfred S. Posamentier

R areas of society and culture they point out numerous examples of the Fibonacci seuence as well as its derivative the golden ratio And of course in mathematics as the authors amply demonstrate there are almost boundless applications in probability number theory geometry algebra and Pascal's triangle to name a fewAccessible and appealing to even the most math phobic individual this fun and enlightening book allows the reader to appreciate the elegance of mathematics and its amazing applications in both natural and cultural settings . The fascinating Fibonacci series

Alfred S. Posamentier ½ 2 Free download

Clarity two veteran math educators take us on a fascinating tour of the many ramifications of the Fibonacci numbers They begin with a brief history of a distinguished Italian discoverer who among other accomplishments was responsible for popularizing the use of Arabic numerals in the West Turning to botany the authors demonstrate through illustrative diagrams the unbelievable connections between Fibonacci numbers and natural forms pineapples sunflowers and daisies are just a few examples In art architecture the stock market and othe. I couldn't get past page 30 and I am a math person I found the book boring and missing many justification for what the author was looking at Though the proofs are in the back of the book they are not detailed enough unless you are fluent in number theory and then they are obvious I didn't read far enough to see if Posamentier talked about all of the numbers in nature that are NOT Fibonacci numbers selective omission While the series is interesting I think you can find patterns and meaning in just about anything if you try hard enough eg Bible code Nostradamus Mayan astronomyI suggest a book about fractals instead