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Yes We Are Latinos

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Juanita lives in New York and is Mexican Felipe lives in Chicago and is Panamanian Venezuelan and black Michiko lives in Los Angeles and is Peruvian and Japanese Each of them is also LatinoThirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States Free verse fictional narratives from the perspective of each youth provide specific stories and circumstan This is an amazing compilation of poems and non fiction text that demonstrates that there are so many varieties of Latinoa people living in the United States I loved hearing from so many perspectives and hearing the histories of so many groups of people This book is consistently labeled as teen and I guess I understand that because I don't imagine many of my students would sit down and read it all in one sitting I do think though that upper grade teachers could use portions of the text to great effect for example when discussing immigration or history I am going to get a copy for our elementary libraryIn one of the poems an older brother says it's okay if others ignore your history and your heritage But it is a crime if you doNever forget who you are This book will help with both of those keeping others from ignoring the history and also helping some to remember theirs Vanishing Girls: Detective Josie Quinn young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States Free verse fictional narratives from the perspective of each Mutants youth provide specific stories and circumstan This is an amazing compilation of poems and non fiction text that demonstrates that there are so many varieties of Latinoa people living in the United States I loved hearing from so many perspectives and hearing the histories of so many groups of people This book is consistently labeled as teen and I guess I understand that because I don't imagine many of my students would sit down and read it all in one sitting I do think though that upper grade teachers could use portions of the text to great effect for example when discussing immigration or history I am going to get a copy for our elementary libraryIn one of the poems an older brother says it's okay if others ignore Hate to Love You (Love/Hate, your history and Parsnips, Buttered: Bamboozle and Boycott Modern Life, One Email at a Time your heritage But it is a crime if Lewis Carroll In His Own Account you doNever forget who Art of Magic the Gathering: Innistrad you are This book will help with both of those keeping others from ignoring the history and also helping some to remember theirs

Read Ñ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Í Alma Flor Ada

Ces for the reader to better understand the Latino people’s uest for identity Each profile is followed by nonfiction prose that further clarifies the character’s background and history touching upon important events in the history of the Latino American people such as the Spanish Civil War immigration to the US and the internment of Latinos with Japanese ancestry during World War IIAlma Flor Ada and F Isabel Campoy’s informational yet heartwarming text p This book is a combination of fictional vignettes and non fiction descriptions of the many diverse Latino groups in the United States The fictional sections are actually narrative poems about childrenstudents living in different parts of the country with different heritages The emphasis is on adapting to a new way of life and also retaining their native culture language and customs Depicted are the difficulties of coping with intolerant or ignorant people The non fiction sections explore the history of each group and the contributions to art or music or literature or science that people of that culture have madeWritten by well respected and award winning authors; Alma Flora Ada and F Isabel Campoy the book is well researched Block print illustrations are by David Diaz They are an excellent addition to the narrative sectionsThis book will be a welcome addition to school libraries on all levels as a resource and as an excellent way to educate students on the diverse backgrounds their fellow LatinaLatino classmates bring to a classroom A great resource for teachers wanting to assign LatinoHispanic figures for multicultural reports or a study of the various countries that make up Latin America

Alma Flor Ada Í 5 Read & Download

Rovides a resource for young Latino readers to see themselves while also encouraging non Latino children to understand the breadth and depth of the contributions made by Latinos in the US Caldecott Medalist David Diaz’s hand cut illustrations are bold and striking perfectly complementing the vibrant stories in the bookYES WE ARE LATINOS stands alone in its presentation of the broad spectrum of Latino culture and will appeal to readers of fiction and nonficti This is a beautiful book I reviewed it on and will find my review Suffice it to say that it is wonderful for students and people who live all over the United States to understand what it means to be Latino it means many different things It can mean you are from Puerto Rico or you are Japanese and Peruvian and your parents only speak Spanish or you are from Miami and your parents were born in Cuba or so much The illustrations by David Diaz are beautiful Please buy it for your school library


10 thoughts on “Yes We Are Latinos

  1. says:

    This is an amazing compilation of poems and non fiction text that demonstrates that there are so many varieties of Latinoa people living in the United States I loved hearing from so many perspectives and hearing the histories of so many groups of people This book is consistently labeled as teen and I guess I understand that because I don't imagine many of my students would sit down and read it all in one sitting I do think though that upper grade teachers could use portions of the text to great effect for example when discussing immigration or history I am going to get a copy for our elementary libraryIn one of the poems an older brother says it's okay if others ignore your history and your heritage But it is a crime if you doNever forget who you are This book will help with both of those keeping others from ignoring the history and also helping some to remember theirs


  2. says:

    A great collection of character vignettes and brief essays about the diverse cultural heritage and historical roots of Latino Americans


  3. says:

    I am excited to share the book Yes We Are Latinos Poems And Prose About the Latino Experience by Alma Flor Ada This International Latino Book Award winner is a collection of memoir poems It is told by different fictional voices and includes non fictional facts about the history of Latinos Each part of this book starts with a poem that begins with “My name is” and “I am from” statements and continues to describe the realization of the Latino culture and the desire to be Americans without losing their identity This book celebrates the essence of Latino history and culture It is a very complex book suitable for 4th 6th grade students The words on the poems are written in English and Spanish so I suggest it is read out loud to students However students who are fluent in English and Spanish can read this book through guided reading Also I believe younger students 1st 3rd grade can benefit from this book For example as a teacher I can have class discussions about family customs and traditions After I can encourage them to draw pictures write stories or poems that will describe who they are This book shows that Latinos do not have just one single story; their stories come from Spain Central America South America and the Caribbean islands Latinos have a richly colorful and diverse culture Their descendants are Africans Asians European Spaniards Sephardic Jews and indigenous people dated as far back as the pre Colombian era There are many things I like about this book and one of them is that Ada gives Latinos a voice Each narrator tells a story about hisher identity and how it was formed whether it was through parents grandparents an aunt or uncle Another reason I like this book so much is that this compilation of narratives clearly defines the Latino culture as being a large part of United States history It is a treasure filled with 96 pages of information that will educate both Latinos and non Latinos about the importance of cultural identity My goal as a teacher is to create the cultural responsive classroom and this book will fit perfectly in the class library to use as a read aloud for discussions about cultural identity the history of the Latino culture including immigration and their struggle for justice and for learning about poetry It is available in two languages English and Spanish Ada created a website for teachers who would like to use this book in the classroom She shares a lot of activities for groups and individual learning suggestions for teaching reading and uestions for discussions to integrate into the lesson plan Please go to for activities you can use in the classroom If you would like to learn about Alma Flor Ada you can go or her like on Facebook at


  4. says:

    I discovered this book while looking through the poetry options on MackinVia where it is available as an e book and I fell in love right away A large population of the students at my school are HispanicLatino and I think this book could be a good way to help them celebrate their culture or to bring up discussion of common issues It also may be that they don't relate to anything in this book and that's okay I think it is so important to offer many representations of different cultures to help our students figure out who they are and to develop well rounded opinions about the world This book begins with a practical and simple explanation What Makes Someone a Latino? This is an important discussion to have with students It also clarifies that the book offers only a sample of what it is like to be Latino which is also important to talk about with your students The rest of the book is full of profiles of different Latinos told in verse Each profile is prefaced by a short informational piece explaining the background related to the poem indigenous roots Latino immigration Cuba and the United States etc One way I would use this in the classroom is to have students draw inferences about the narrator based on the poem For example in one of the poems a father says to the son You don't want to break your back every day like I do I would have students infer what that means about the father's work what jobs he may have and what he hopes for his son Overall this book has a very practical application to encourage discussion of diverse cultures told through beautiful verse


  5. says:

    This book is a combination of fictional vignettes and non fiction descriptions of the many diverse Latino groups in the United States The fictional sections are actually narrative poems about childrenstudents living in different parts of the country with different heritages The emphasis is on adapting to a new way of life and also retaining their native culture language and customs Depicted are the difficulties of coping with intolerant or ignorant people The non fiction sections explore the history of each group and the contributions to art or music or literature or science that people of that culture have madeWritten by well respected and award winning authors; Alma Flora Ada and F Isabel Campoy the book is well researched Block print illustrations are by David Diaz They are an excellent addition to the narrative sectionsThis book will be a welcome addition to school libraries on all levels as a resource and as an excellent way to educate students on the diverse backgrounds their fellow LatinaLatino classmates bring to a classroom A great resource for teachers wanting to assign LatinoHispanic figures for multicultural reports or a study of the various countries that make up Latin America


  6. says:

    The voices of thirteen Latinoas can be heard proudly claiming their heritage and telling their uniue stories in the 12 narrative poems in this book The authors alternate the fictionalized accounts of individuals such as Jose Miguel whose name means everything to him and Lili and Michiko whose Latino heritages are mixed with Chinese and Japanese respectively with nonfiction sections highlighting the history culture triumphs and challenges of those they represent By the time readers reach the conclusion of this ground breaking and enlightening book they will have a much broader understanding of what it means to be Latinoa as well as just how complicated it may be The illustrator's trademark hand cut illustrations have been colored through Adobe Photoshop and lend a handsome appearance to this important engaging and empowering book


  7. says:

    TED 8650 Children's LiteratureText to World This book is about children from countries all over the world and living all over the United States yet they are all LatinoLatina They share their stories and there is also a nonfiction piece that follows each storyDiscussion uestions1 List four countries that the children in the book are from2 How would you characterize the children in the book?3 What uestions would you ask in an interview with a LatinoLatina person?4 Pick two children from the story How are they alike? How are they different?5 What is your favorite poem in the book? Why?6 Write a poem about yourself and a time in your life like the children in the story2013 June 17 Publishers Weekly


  8. says:

    This is a beautiful book I reviewed it on and will find my review Suffice it to say that it is wonderful for students and people who live all over the United States to understand what it means to be Latino it means many different things It can mean you are from Puerto Rico or you are Japanese and Peruvian and your parents only speak Spanish or you are from Miami and your parents were born in Cuba or so much The illustrations by David Diaz are beautiful Please buy it for your school library


  9. says:

    How to compress the experiences of 12 different Latinos or Latinas in the United States in order to show both the variety and the richness of the cultures in brief poetry and prose sounds like a challenge to accomplish yet these two authors have managed that very well indeed This book chronicles the stories of twelve different immigrants who live in the US all with important heritages to consider including varied and interesting backgrounds along with the stereotypes that are often faced in their daily lives The poems are written in first person with a second part showing background history of the person’s culture Included are those from Mexico El Salvador Cuba and Nicaragua Guatamalan Chinese Japanese from Peru and seven others There is an introduction explaining what makes someone Latino and additional information at the end Poems poignant in the frustration of having to explain misconceptions often but remaining proud of the personal cultural heritage show much feeling in the few pages of each one Here are a few memorable lines “”If you would let us call youJoe or MikeIt would let you blend in” “Abu Amaya gets animatedand there is the same sadnessin boththe same outragein bothand in both the same painfor a dream that was destroyed” Illustrations by David Diaz Smoky Nights are silhouettes showing one scene from each story poem including beautiful detail This is a poetry anthology every middle and high school should own hopefully than one copy


  10. says:

    filled with poetic stories and facts this book is entertaining and informative The factual text is filled with gems of info but for the most part is not overwhelmingSantiago DominicanI really wanted to read I felt like he was a real kid and I was caught myself about to Google him to see if he ever made that hospital he wantedJose Miguel Cuban NicaraguanI LOVED this one The boy in this story does not want to be called Joe or Mike to blend in he wants people to just accept his name This is a pet peeve of mine If people can say Tchaikovsky without wrinkling their nose in confusion they can say Babatunde or Jose Miguel the same way And the love of the grandfather to grandson and vice versa bleeds off the page love it The factual text made me angry There was hardcore easy to understand information explaining the US Cuban relationship in those 2 pages than I got in my entire schooling careerFelipe Panamanian Venezuelan Blackhis love for Angelita was beautiful and i wanted to see his art workLili Guatemalan Chinese Michiko Peruvian JapaneseAlthough I really like the characters I thought the prose here was the weakest of what I read It felt like the intro to a young elementary school book about two best friends There is nothing wrong with that either but it didnt pull me with the rhythm of the words the way the rest didMinimal black and white artwork book recommended for middle school and up


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