READ ↠ The Idol of Mombasa Vera Tolliver #2

The Idol of Mombasa Vera Tolliver #2

REVIEW The Idol of Mombasa Vera Tolliver #2

The British don’t belong in Africa Their skins are too pale their clothing too heavy and elaborate their morality all wrong And yet here they are in 1912 in the British Protectorate of East Africa tangled in an uneasy peace with the Sultan of ZanzibarMuch of the tangle in this new mystery in Alfieri’s East Africa series concerns the s. Set in 1912 in the British Protectorate of East Africa now Kenya The Idol of Mombasa is Alfieri’s second novel featuring Justin and Vera Tolliver In this book the newlyweds embark on a none too welcome stay in the steamy smelly coastal city of Mombasa where Justin is the new Assistant District Superintendent of Police In Mombasa they find themselves in a deliciously rendered stewpot of mixed racial ethnic religious and cultural backgrounds and loyalties Though the local government is British Mombasa—and that portion of its population that is Arab—remains under the significant influence of the Sultan of Zanzibar The British have introduced into the police service their loyal Indian subjects and Africans of many tribes fill the population The Tollivers are a mix too Justin is the second son of a Yorkshire earl He had a conventional if aristocratic upbringing but possesses no fortune Vera is of a free spirit She’s the daughter of a Scottish missionary born and raised in the Protectorate’s pastoral up country region The conflicts inherent between and among such wildly diverse people are tailor made for both social and domestic dramaThe novel’s prologue describes a daring nighttime slave and ivory smuggling operation and the book’s central dilemma relates to the illegal but uietly tolerated practice of holding and selling slaves Vera is an absolutist unable to countenance slavery in any form whereas Justin may be as morally opposed but constrained by unwritten policy and his superiors When a runaway slave is murdered followed soon after by the death of a notorious Arab slave trafficker Justin and Vera both set out to find the perpetrator—he in his official capacity and she with secret possibly risky and sometimes unaccountably naïve actions of her own Conflict between the couple is thereby assured as Justin alternately admires and is frustrated by Vera’s passionate impulsive personality Alfieri’s descriptions of exotic Mombasa and its environs a hundred years ago vividly evoke the setting Her writing is clear and interesting yet somehow doesn’t exude a strong sense of menace despite the cast of desperate characters and perilous environment She keeps multipleplot balls up in the air through a set of intriguing and well drawn secondary characters The net result is that this atmospheric novel transports you back in time and across continents to set you down in the middle of Mombasa 1912

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Lave trade The British have outlawed it but well it’s all a matter of who you know and who you owe isn’t it That slippery morality infuriates Vera Tolliver a Scottish missionary’s daughter and the bride of a English police officer whose job it is to enforce the law after he figures out what it is The murder of a runaway slave only i. This book had a very interesting setting The novel took place in 1912 Africa The characters were vivid and interesting and they brought different prospective to the mystery Hopefully we will see Vera and Tolliver again

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Ncreases the complications especially because a longtime friend of Vera’s family is the likeliest suspect Meanwhile both the British government and the Sultanate sail above it all as though they had nothing to do with the problem But both Vera and Tolliver could tell you that official fingers are knotted into the tangle’s every strand. Mombasa is a city on the south coast of Kenya In 1912 it is run by the British but technically belongs to the Sultan of Zanzibar Recently married Justin and Vera Tolliver are stuck there because of his job as a policeman Both are to some extent uncomfortable characters both in their cultures and with each other Raised in Africa Vera has a hard time behaving as a proper English lady And Justin by joining the police is seen as a defector by his class Justin’s sergeant Kwai Libazo is another misfit half Kikuyu and half Masai – and accepted by neither tribe One character a young girl kidnaped into slavery completes the misfit uartet The setting is uite intriguing and the dynamics between the characters especially Justin and Libazo are interestingly complex American Presidents, Deportations, and Human Rights Violations had nothing to do with the problem But both Vera and Tolliver could tell you that official fingers are knotted into the tangle’s every strand. Mombasa is a city on the south coast of Kenya In 1912 it is run by the British but technically belongs to the Sultan of Zanzibar Recently married Justin and Vera Tolliver are stuck there because of Rediscovering Our Galaxy (Iau S334) his job as a policeman Both are to some extent uncomfortable characters both in their cultures and with each other Raised in Africa Vera When Movements Become Parties has a Gekka Mugentan, Vol. 6 hard time behaving as a proper English lady And Justin by joining the police is seen as a defector by Illegal Affairs his class Justin’s sergeant Kwai Libazo is another misfit 21 Short Plays half Kikuyu and Angel of Sudden Hill half Masai – and accepted by neither tribe One character a young girl kidnaped into slavery completes the misfit uartet The setting is uite intriguing and the dynamics between the characters especially Justin and Libazo are interestingly complex


10 thoughts on “The Idol of Mombasa Vera Tolliver #2

  1. says:

    Set in 1912 in the British Protectorate of East Africa now Kenya The Idol of Mombasa is Alfieri’s second novel featuring Justin and Vera Tolliver In this book the newlyweds embark on a none too welcome stay in the steamy smelly coastal city of Mombasa where Justin is the new Assistant District Superintendent of Police In Mombasa they find themselves in a deliciously rendered stewpot of mixed racial ethnic religious and cultural backgrounds and loyalties Though the local government is British Mombasa—and that portion of its population that is Arab—remains under the significant influence of the Sultan of Zanzibar The British have introduced into the police service their loyal Indian subjects and Africans of many tribes fill the population The Tollivers are a mix too Justin is the second son of a Yorkshire earl He had a conventional if aristocratic upbringing but possesses no fortune Vera is of a free spirit She’s the daughter of a Scottish missionary born and raised in the Protectorate’s pastoral up country region The conflicts inherent between and among such wildly diverse people are tailor made for both social and domestic dramaThe novel’s prologue describes a daring nighttime slave and ivory smuggling operation and the book’s central dilemma relates to the illegal but uietly tolerated practice of holding and selling slaves Vera is an absolutist unable to countenance slavery in any form whereas Justin may be as morally opposed but constrained by unwritten policy and his superiors When a runaway slave is murdered followed soon after by the death of a notorious Arab slave trafficker Justin and Vera both set out to find the perpetrator—he in his official capacity and she with secret possibly risky and sometimes unaccountably naïve actions of her own Conflict between the couple is thereby assured as Justin alternately admires and is frustrated by Vera’s passionate impulsive personality Alfieri’s descriptions of exotic Mombasa and its environs a hundred years ago vividly evoke the setting Her writing is clear and interesting yet somehow doesn’t exude a strong sense of menace despite the cast of desperate characters and perilous environment She keeps multipleplot balls up in the air through a set of intriguing and well drawn secondary characters The net result is that this atmospheric novel transports you back in time and across continents to set you down in the middle of Mombasa 1912


  2. says:

    I received this book from Goodreads in exchange for a reviewAuthor Annamaria Alfieri does a remarkable job of immersing the reader into the sights sounds and temperament of 1912 Mombasa Vera and Justin are newlywed and newly arrived in Mombasa where Tolliver will take up his post as a police officer serving the British Protectorate Things in Mombasa aren’t all cut and dried While British law has outlawed slavery there are those in Mombasa that reap huge profits from it They have no desire to banish a practice that provides such monetary benefits When a runaway slave is murdered the British specifically DS Hugh Egerton Justin’s commander wants to ignore the problem rather than find the killer All of this occurs during the visit of the Grand Mufti a man of outspoken religious beliefsVera and Justin find themselves balancing on a very fine wire when it comes to solving the murder and the subseuent murder of Majidi Vera’s missionary background finds it intolerable that any life should be taken and wants to find the person responsible for the heinous crime while Justin finds himself being ordered away from the investigation to attend to other trivial matters Alfieri’s writing brought a time in history to life when the British are trying to establish their own rules while also trying to remain on the good side of the Sultan of Zanzibar Many citizens do not like the British involvement in their country and have no desire to change a system that has worked for them for many years Meanwhile the British feel themselves superior to those who live in Mombasa It is truly a sad time in world history‘The Idol of Mombasa’ is a murder mystery a romance and a history lesson all wrapped into one very good story


  3. says:

    Set in colonial Kenya this is the second of the Vera and Tolliver mystery series Vera and Justin Tolliver have just returned from their honeymoon in England in early 1912 They arrive in Mombasa and right away Justin is caught up in a murder case where a runaway slave has been murdered Slavery has been outlawed by the British government but along the Indian Ocean coastline it still seems a fairly common practice and the colonial government seems to turn a blind eye to it There are many things the author captures well As a child we often went to Mombasa during my childhood in Tanzania and I found that though I was there many decades later she captured the place well Vera is a daughter of missionaries and I am a son of one and Alfieri captures the in between cultural nature of us well She captures the time and culture well There are times in both the first book and this one that she makes small mistakes that really stand out for people who have lived there In the first one she put an apostrophe in the title Bwana and in this one I was shocked that Vera and Tolliver ate apples for lunch one day A century later you might see this happen but apples don't really grow well in this tropical climate and there was no way to ship them back then Otherwise the story is good and captures the time place and intermingling cultures of this place very well


  4. says:

    Set in British colonial era Mombasa East Africa this mystery involves the murder of a runaway slave and an unscrupulous slave trader Even though British law has banned slavery it is still practiced under the Sultan of Zanzibar He is the local ruler who has allowed the British to administer the region in exchange for trade and other benefits Vera the daughter of a missionary and her husband a British police officer find the challenges of their new home difficult to live with Having been born in Africa Vera doesn't have the same prejudice as many of the other British She is also not willing to tolerate some of the local behaviors practiced whether it is slavery or the treatment of women


  5. says:

    This book had a very interesting setting The novel took place in 1912 Africa The characters were vivid and interesting and they brought different prospective to the mystery Hopefully we will see Vera and Tolliver again


  6. says:

    East Africa in the 1920s Mystery Clash of cultures


  7. says:

    The Idol of Mombasa is a lovely mixture of a cozy mystery mixed with an exotic locale and a keen sense of British imperial behaviourVera and Justin Tolliver make for an interesting couple he is aristocratic but determined to do the day by day sleuthing of a police office; she is ostensibly a dutiful colonial wife but is also imbued with a great deal of curiosity and awareness She sees things he can’t because she is a woman and the tension that arises between them because of her intelligence and passion is finely drawn Alifieri is best at her descriptions of the locale Mombasa She deftly deals with the complexity of a multi ethnic society and various characters come to life Tolliver’s sidekick Libazo is particularly appealing The murderer was a surprise and the ending is neatly set up to see of the Tollivers amid other East African settings This was an enjoyable read


  8. says:

    Very historical read I was taken to a place I can only imagine and with this story I felt the impulse of Africa Enjoyed the characters they were the true energy of the book besides the author's talent for writing Winner of a free book Goodreads First Read Giveaway Thank you Darlene Cruz


  9. says:

    Mombasa is a city on the south coast of Kenya In 1912 it is run by the British but technically belongs to the Sultan of Zanzibar Recently married Justin and Vera Tolliver are stuck there because of his job as a policeman Both are to some extent uncomfortable characters both in their cultures and with each other Raised in Africa Vera has a hard time behaving as a proper English lady And Justin by joining the police is seen as a defector by his class Justin’s sergeant Kwai Libazo is another misfit half Kikuyu and half Masai – and accepted by neither tribe One character a young girl kidnaped into slavery completes the misfit uartet The setting is uite intriguing and the dynamics between the characters especially Justin and Libazo are interestingly complex


  10. says:

    Vera and Justin Toliver now married return to Africa with Justin assuming his police responsibilities in Mombasa Here the established British rule must be balanced with the dictates of the Muslim faith Also the uestion arises as to when does the moral and ethical beliefs of one culture impinge on the philosophy of another


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