Into the Forest review  103

Into the Forest

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Son to take a cake to his sick grandma Don't go into the forest she warns Go the long way round Ages A breath taking picture book It starts with the father leaving home goes deep into the forest with the boy's mixed feelings and ends up by the boy taking his father back where he belongs Going into the forest the non real world as the only colored object shows us the boy's inside tormoile finding a red jacket just like red riding hood's indicates both danger and wormth His grandmother's house is not that of a dangerous wolf's but of an end to his troubles What not to love about this book Thank you Haifa Kitty Princess and the Newspaper Dress round Ages A breath taking picture book It starts with the father leaving home goes deep into the forest with the boy's mixed feelings and ends up by the boy taking his father back where he belongs Going into the forest the non Let God Guide You Daily real world as the only colored object shows us the boy's inside tormoile finding a The Art of the Hustle red jacket just like Adolfo Kaminsky red Aik Thi Sara / ایک تھی سارہ riding hood's indicates both danger and wormth His grandmother's house is not that of a dangerous wolf's but of an end to his troubles What not to love about this book Thank you Haifa

summary à eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Anthony Browne

One night a boy is woken by a terrible sound A storm is breaking lightning flashing across the sky I As with most of Browne’s work there is an obscurity to this story which allows for a multitude of meaning making which I LOVE After finding out that his father has left home and that his mother is uncertain of his return a young boy embarks upon a forbidden journey to his grandmother’s house Without ruining the story this venture is fraught with anxieties and the reader is left with an uncertainty as to his motivations and discoveries along the way A story that is certainly not as straight forward as it first appears and one that reuires sitting and drinking in for a little while

Anthony Browne ↠ 3 summary

N the morning Dad is gone and Mum doesn't seem to know when he'll be back The next day Mum asks her Picture book extended diary entryInto the forest by Anthony Browne One night a boy is woken by a terrible sound A storm is breaking lightning flashing across the sky In the morning Dad is gone and Mum doesn't seem to know when he'll be back The next day Mum asks the boy to take a cake to his grandma who is ill “Don’t go into the forest” she warns “Go the long way round” But against his Mother’s wishes the boy chooses to take the path into a dark mysterious forest which is teeming with strange fairy tale characters He must navigate this magical forest in order to reach his grandmaI simply couldn’t imagine a world without Anthony Brown books From Voices in the park to Gorilla he has delighted readers both young and old with his vibrant in depth illustrations and his intertextuality of narratives Into the forest is no exception This story explores feelings of loss fear and insecurity The illustrations are sinister in places and have a Grimm’s fairy tale darkness about them The readers fundamentally will add their own depth of interpretation to this enchanting storyI decided to use this book when I took over a nurture class We created a forest display with a beautiful carved sign saying into the forest I backed the boards in hessian used branches for the trees I began reading into the forest in September the children helped decorate our display with Andy Goldsworthy inspired art work We explored what the forest would look like during all the different seasons In autumn we researched types of trees We looked at the forest animals and identified the ones that hibernated and made a hedgehog hotel in the school grounds As we moved on through the seasons Our leaves fell from our trees and sat nested on the forest floor As we moved through winter the children painted animal silhouettes on snowy backgrounds and made paper snowflakes As spring came we had pictures of newborn lambs tadpoles chicks On the forest floor where pictures of germinating seedlings we labelled everything There were bluebells and daffodils the children made butterflies and beautiful leaves out of tissue paper We grew sunflowers from seed and learned all about bees We explored offspring and birth landscapes habitats and forests from all around the world and the animals’ birds and insects that lived there We finished our year in summer by visiting Moors Valley country parkLesson Ideas year 3Introductionchildren the front cover ask the chn to think pair share what they think the story is about Choose children to answer using class name sticks On flip chart have a picture of the front cover write children’s ideas around the picture What kind of story might it be What will it be about Where might the boy be going Why What other stories do they know which might be similarThen ask the chn to think pair share what they think the first line of the story might be Write them on the boardLiteracyChildren create a story map Work with them to model this on the board Success Criteria Have I accurately retold the story Have I used simple notes and sentences Have I used visual prompts to aid my writingand write a recount of what happened as a diary entry in role as the boy in the story Think about feelings emotions the boy had What noises he heard What he saw How he feltMusicLook at the first page of the story 1Use voices andor percussion instruments to recreate the sounds of the stormDrama In pairs children freeze frame a scene from the bookArtChildren create a collage of the front cover


10 thoughts on “Into the Forest

  1. says:

    A sweet story with a few different connotations of real life and fairy tale mixed in Beautifully illustrated the story is very sweet Little boy is delivering a cake made by mum to Grandma who is 'doing poorly' He has a rebellious moment when he takes the short cut through the forest when mum says not to do so Encountering a few scary things along the wayMy favourite line was when he was offered to buy a cow from another little boy Do you want to buy a milky moo cow he askedNo I said Why would I want a cow?


  2. says:

    Well ok I watched it being read aloud on youtube The reader did a good job of making the boy's uest echo his anxieties but without making the listener feel terribly creeped out Definitely for children old enough to know the original tales Remember it's the grandmother who planted the stories in the boy's imagination Browne's art as usual is amazing For example the use of black white sometimes color others is akin to that of the movie of The Wizard of Oz but reversed Discuss with your child students why this might be2017 SCF Read a print copy Looked deeper much deeper into the backgrounds of the forest scene and saw a lot I missed Brilliant


  3. says:

    As with most of Browne’s work there is an obscurity to this story which allows for a multitude of meaning making which I LOVE After finding out that his father has left home and that his mother is uncertain of his return a young boy embarks upon a forbidden journey to his grandmother’s house Without ruining the story this venture is fraught with anxieties and the reader is left with an uncertainty as to his motivations and discoveries along the way A story that is certainly not as straight forward as it first appears and one that reuires sitting and drinking in for a little while


  4. says:

    Anthony BrowneInto the Forest “Mum asked me to take a cake to Grandma who was poorly She told me to go the long way round but I wanted to be home in case Dad came back So instead I chose the forbidden path into the forest”I love Anthony Browne If I were forced under extreme duress to choose my favourite children’s author – it might have to be Anthony Browne and the book might have to be “Into the Forest” actually it could be Gorilla but that’s a different reviewThere is so much in this book and it is so skilfully put there that it is hard to know where to start and difficult to express in words This is partly because Anthony Browne’s great skill lies not in the words themselves – but what is not said and of course in the illustrationsLike many of his books “Into the Forest” has a dark undertone In this case it is three fold both the Grimm like references to children lost in the forest in traditional fairy tales; and the characteristic way that Anthony Browne portrays the dead weight of adult concerns kept from children and the impact that they nevertheless have The third layer of complexity is the unspoken interpretation of the reader be they child or adult about what might be going on Having been woken by a “terrible sound” we see a picture of a thunderstorm the child finds that his Dad is not there and Mum looking like an Edward Hopper painting of loneliness and care doesn’t seem to know when he is coming backIn this case the underlying adult concern is an ill grandparent – but the story told entirely from the child’s point of view tells of the child going to visit Grandma and venturing into the forbidden forest Of course we are immediately in the traditional tale of Little Red Riding Hood and at one point the child does find a bright red coat and have a strong feeling that “something was following me” The child however never meets the big bad wolf Instead they meet Jack selling his cow; a girl with “Golden hair” who I suppose in the context could be Goldilocks but looks very like Alice also illustrated by Anthony Browne; and Hansel and Gretel again familiar not only from the traditional tale but the version written and illustrated by Anthony Browne These are the direct references in the text to the alternate world of the traditional tales but references to them are also peppered throughout the extraordinary illustrations In the forbidden forest we see in black and white in the background Rapunzel’s tower and her golden plait falling from the window the pumpkin and glass slipper from Cinderella the spinning wheel from Sleeping Beauty and Rumpelstiltskin a Prince on a horse a magic key fairy houses among the treesThe black and white drawings create the sense of other worldliness that is the boys imagination the fear in the forest and the trepidation as he finally reaches and knocks on Grandma’s doorWhen the door opens and inside he finds Grandma and finally Dad – the warmth and colour of the illustrations burst from the pages in reliefHow you might use this book in classThis would be great as just a read aloud book for pleasure – it would be important to show the illustration in detail though However there is so much in it to explore that it would be ideal as a whole class guided reading text for Years 23You could explore it in the context of traditional tales – investigating all the references and perhaps considering alternative “happy” endings just as Anthony Browne has done here You could explore the role of imagination in story telling and the role of illustration in that “Why are some pictures in black and white and others in colour?”It would also work well as a text that you reveal slowly over a series of lessons – each small section stands on its own with plenty to discuss but the whole story is not really revealed until the final pages Until then the whole book is full of suspense and so many opportunities for inference and prediction “Where do you think the child’s father is?”; “what might happen to the woodcutter’s children?”; “Who might be following the child in the red coat?” “Who do you think is in Grandma’s bed?”Despite being an unusual book it is a good example of a traditional story telling written in the first person narrative with some direct speech and a clear “beginningmiddleend”structure It would make a good model for writing – for example developing alternative endings to traditional tales You would need to be sensitive to children who might not have secure family relationships might have lost a grandparent to illness or have an absent parent some young children might also be a little afraid of the forest and what lurks in it – however none of these things would be concerning if it were managed wellI wholeheartedly recommend this book to everyone parents children teachers – like all Anthony Browne books it grows with every reading


  5. says:

    Picture book extended diary entryInto the forest by Anthony Browne One night a boy is woken by a terrible sound A storm is breaking lightning flashing across the sky In the morning Dad is gone and Mum doesn't seem to know when he'll be back The next day Mum asks the boy to take a cake to his grandma who is ill “Don’t go into the forest” she warns “Go the long way round” But against his Mother’s wishes the boy chooses to take the path into a dark mysterious forest which is teeming with strange fairy tale characters He must navigate this magical forest in order to reach his grandmaI simply couldn’t imagine a world without Anthony Brown books From Voices in the park to Gorilla he has delighted readers both young and old with his vibrant in depth illustrations and his intertextuality of narratives Into the forest is no exception This story explores feelings of loss fear and insecurity The illustrations are sinister in places and have a Grimm’s fairy tale darkness about them The readers fundamentally will add their own depth of interpretation to this enchanting storyI decided to use this book when I took over a nurture class We created a forest display with a beautiful carved sign saying into the forest I backed the boards in hessian used branches for the trees I began reading into the forest in September the children helped decorate our display with Andy Goldsworthy inspired art work We explored what the forest would look like during all the different seasons In autumn we researched types of trees We looked at the forest animals and identified the ones that hibernated and made a hedgehog hotel in the school grounds As we moved on through the seasons Our leaves fell from our trees and sat nested on the forest floor As we moved through winter the children painted animal silhouettes on snowy backgrounds and made paper snowflakes As spring came we had pictures of newborn lambs tadpoles chicks On the forest floor where pictures of germinating seedlings we labelled everything There were bluebells and daffodils the children made butterflies and beautiful leaves out of tissue paper We grew sunflowers from seed and learned all about bees We explored offspring and birth landscapes habitats and forests from all around the world and the animals’ birds and insects that lived there We finished our year in summer by visiting Moors Valley country parkLesson Ideas year 3Introductionchildren the front cover ask the chn to think pair share what they think the story is about Choose children to answer using class name sticks On flip chart have a picture of the front cover write children’s ideas around the picture What kind of story might it be? What will it be about? Where might the boy be going? Why? What other stories do they know which might be similar?Then ask the chn to think pair share what they think the first line of the story might be Write them on the boardLiteracyChildren create a story map Work with them to model this on the board Success Criteria Have I accurately retold the story? Have I used simple notes and sentences? Have I used visual prompts to aid my writing?and write a recount of what happened as a diary entry in role as the boy in the story Think about feelings emotions the boy had What noises he heard? What he saw? How he felt?MusicLook at the first page of the story 1Use voices andor percussion instruments to recreate the sounds of the stormDrama In pairs children freeze frame a scene from the bookArtChildren create a collage of the front cover


  6. says:

    This is a beautifully illustrated book about a young boy who wakes up one morning to find that his Dad is nowhere to be seen He asks his mother but she doesn’t seem to know either which increases the distress of the boy Mum then asks him to take some cake to Grandma who is sick The boy obliges but on his way to Grandma’s takes a shortcut through the forest despite Mum’s warning not to In the forest the boy meets several characters from other children’s fairytales and describes clearly how he felt at bumping into such random characters on his way to Grandma’s The book conveys the genuine worry that the young boy felt when he didn’t know where is father had gone The illustrations demonstrate the fear and apprehension that the boy felt when he was alone in the woods with all of these characters from well known fairytales The darkness of the black and white pictures shows the woods to be uite mysterious and scary while the brightness of the colour used in the pictures of the boy clearly contrast this Suspense is created from the outset when we are wondering where Dad has gone and is built up again once the boy enters the forest The reader is wondering whether or not he will make it safely to Grandma’s houseI think the illustrations in this book would stand out to children the most They could look for the hidden pictures depicting scenes from fairytales within the larger pictures I also think the colours uses in the pictures add to the mystery of the book and will have children wondering what else could be lurking within the forest and whether or not the boy will make it safely to Grandma’s house I recently read this book with a class and we did a role play to music to convey the emotions that the boy was feeling in each stage of the book The children were completely engaged throughout the lesson and really seemed to enjoy the drama aspect They particularly liked creating suspense in the story through the use of music


  7. says:

    A breath taking picture book It starts with the father leaving home goes deep into the forest with the boy's mixed feelings and ends up by the boy taking his father back where he belongs Going into the forest the non real world as the only colored object shows us the boy's inside tormoile finding a red jacket just like red riding hood's indicates both danger and wormth His grandmother's house is not that of a dangerous wolf's but of an end to his troubles What not to love about this book? Thank you Haifa


  8. says:

    Another beautifully illustrated Anthony Browne book I like to use this one with grades 3 to teach about making connections with a story There are suggestions of popular Fairy Tales through the illustrations and the protagonist in the book is making connections too The illustrations have so many hidden elements and messages I have had some older children identify the black and white illustrations as the boy's imagination and the colour as reality The older children do find the ending a bit of a let down but that is the only downside to a fun book


  9. says:

    Summary Although the text in Into the Forest is minimal and somewhat simple the book is intended for readers in grades 2 5 This story is based on the traditional Little Red Riding Hood story It begins with a young boy who wakes up during a terrible thunderstorm When he gets up he and his mother sit silently at the breakfast table wondering where his dad could be because he never came home Then his mother asked the boy to go visit his grandma because she wasn't feeling well Much like the traditional story his mother sent him with a basket and told him to go to his grandma's but advised him not to go into the forest The boy didn't listen and walked through the forest and ran into very strange people The deeper he walked into the forest the colder it was and he wished he had brought a coat All of a sudden a red hooded coat appeared hanging in a tree He finally came upon his Grandma's house and realized that it didn't sound like his grandma but it was Then he heard another sound behind him and it was his dad After their visit the boy and his dad went home to see his momResponse Such an interesting bookI actually found it to be uite disturbing Although the Little Red Riding Hood is a somewhat scary story with the frightening wolf it pales in comparison to this interpretation of the traditional tale The illustrations made the text very unnerving The pictures were black and white through the forest with scary people coming out at the boy who was in color and the pages at home and at his grandma's house were in color The image of the boy and his mother sitting at the breakfast table missing his father made it seem like something very terrible had happened to his dad who knows what really happened with him Most young children would be upset reading this Then as he walked through the forest the creepy young children that came up to him seemed like horrible ghosts The mood of most of the story was very dark but at the end brightens up as the family reunites It was definitely not a typical children's story I would not recommend this book to young children I think it should probably be read with older students because of the frightening content


  10. says:

    At the beginning of the story a boy discovers that his father is gone It is a sad disturbing story which highlights children's worries and anxieties The boy's Mum asks him to take a cake to his Grandma's house He decided to take the shorter route through the forest where he meeets characters that represent Hansel and Gretel Jack Goldilocks while the boy himself is playing the role of red riding hood ALthough the illustrations would be uite scary to young children they are very creative and engaging which may be suitable for KS1 It can introduce the idea that a story can have than one meaning and how to read between the lines The art work respresents the mood of the book which could be used to discuss in an art lesson on how different colours convey different moods blackgrey dullscarysad as the illustrations turn the mood around at the end of the story with a colourful warm illustration which how his dad is at his grandma's house enjoying some cake Although I wouldn't focus on this book too much in class it would be good to highlight the creative illustrations and possibly prompt a dicussion during circle time about children's commmon worries


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