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10 thoughts on “Ran Away Benjamin January #11

  1. says:

    At an early point in this book I sort of poinged and said aloud to the great confusion of my co workers Ayasha's bookLet me step back this is not a preuel to the series where Benjamin January a free man of color lives in nineteenth century New Orleans But there is a frame to a fairly extensive flashback which contains its own little mystery about a runaway girl so this remains the rightful seuel to The Shirt on His BackI was excited to meet Benjamin's first wife Ayasha who's been referenced in the earlier books of this series; eager too to see how Ben lived in Paris without the chains of social restraints against people with dark skin And this period is evoked beautifully Benjamin is lighter hearted prone to teasing his wife who is very much a vivid personality I'm only sorry it took this long to get to meet herIn contrast Rose seems to only get a cameo role little moments that reminded me why I liked her but hardly enough to bring her out as a true eual to Benjamin This is pretty important when the man is suddenly having yearning dreams about his first wife a matter handled with delicate care by the end but which felt clumsy along the way I'm also frankly astonished that view spoilertheir son is barely mentioned an infant should turn a family upside down but there was little indication of such household chaos hide spoiler


  2. says:

    This book felt like two separate stories with a very thin connection between them The first hundred pages involve January's search for a missing girl in Paris ten years before and we finally get to meet the living Ayasha January's first wifeWe've had what? ten books that tell us of the deep love he had for this woman whose death drove him back to the land of his birth a place he'd sworn never to visit again His grief and yearning were as much a part of his character as the slow blossoming of his love for Rose The problem is that after meeting Ayasha I don't get it Hambly who usually writes such strong and interesting female lead characters gives us a largely absent woman who pops in from time to time to throw out a sassy comment or eat all of the half starved January's dinnerbreakfastlunchwhatever food he's managed to grab between teaching playing gigsAfter all that time expectation Ayasha was mostly a letdown for me and I just didn't buy the appealWe return to January's present ten years later back in New Orleans with Rose and their newborn son and to a rather muddled murder mystery involving one of the same principals from the Paris story Added to that is their newfound occupation of underground railroad station which gets almost no exploration January's family plays a disappointingly small role Olympe was only mentioned a couple of times like an actress on a pregnancy break from her tv series Rose is understanding for a paragraph or two and Dominiue gets to flutter around in a small cameo With such phoned in performances by the lead characters it was impossible to sell the VERRRRRRRRRRRY thin coincidence at the end and the reveal was of a hohum than an ahaNot my favorite I might have to go back and re read some of the earlier ones to remind me of why I liked this series in the first placePS Abu means father in Arabic not servant


  3. says:

    Another enjoyable book in this mystery series set in 1830’s New Orleans except about a third of this one takes place 10 years earlier when Benjamin Janvier is living in Paris and married to his first wife the dressmaker Ayasha It was very nice to read about their time together and Benjamin’s lasting grief is poignantA rich Turkish man a newcomer to New Orleans is accused of murdering his two concubines Benjamin knew the Turk in Paris their mutual adventures are described in that long flashback and tries to prove his innocenceThe book is full of amazing coincidences and last minute rescues but as always the atmosphere is wonderful and I’m very attached to these characters


  4. says:

    Barbara Hambly is still at the top of her game in this addition to the much loved Benjamin January series In this book we get to meet Ayasha Ben's first wife for the first time I wish I had seen of her character than feisty but generous I'm sure living as a Berber immigrant in Paris could not have been easy for her There's a lot to Ayasha's story than we got here We essentially have a pair of mysteries a Turk in New Orleans has been accused of murdering his concubines and pitching them out his front window Everyone knows that he did it because of the insane jealousy of the Turk Ben however knew this man in Paris and simply can't believe itSo we get an extended visit back in time to Paris so we learn how Ben knows this man I've been seeing a lot of stuff with Paris recently Midnight in Paris Hugo and I keep falling in love with the city each time Hambly does her usual splendid job of evoking setting and character In Paris January and Ayasha must solve the mystery of a runaway concubineNext we're back in New Orleans trying to figure out what really happened to these poor women The usual folks appear January's mother Dominiue Rose Hannibal Shaw The mystery is a bit spinny and perhaps solved a bit too neatly with a bit of a reach But I love visiting this time and place with these characters This beautiful and terrible period these tragic and heroic souls always evoke in me a feeling of sadness and yet a bit of wistfulness too at the same time that I feel awfully lucky to be in this when and where This novel also tackles the meaning of slavery in other cultures Hambly has actually managed to create a sympathetic conservative Muslim character and I'm not sure how I feel about that To each country it's own custom she says noting that our attitudes toward slavery at the same time weren't exactly enlightened either True but I still can't forgive the treatment of women in the repressive Muslim societies today As a man of his time and place however the Pasha was a good man


  5. says:

    Another delightful outing from Hambly I was explaining to a friend how I now read so many new to me authors than I ever have but so many of those books make me forget what a deep abiding pleasure that reading can be When I read Hambly I always find that deeply absorbed completely immersed pleasure again As well Hambly's one of the few White authors who to my mind writes of other races and cultures with lucid mindfulness and a humanist empathy that seemed remarkable before I started reading so widely and now that I do seems almost completely uniue This outing gets deeper into Benjamin January's exile in Paris; not just the still painful memories of his dead wife Ayasha but the places and friends he knew so intimately and left behind when he returned to America It adds fullness not only to Ben's backstory and character but a greater context of the tragedy of Ayasha's death and how much it cost him to leave that piece of his life behind regardless of the happiness he's found now Because the book goes so uickly into an extended flashback I was worried that the bulk of the mystery would be set in the past in Paris and that the secondary mystery presented in the prologue would end up being an afterthought I really needn't have worried though; Hambly did an excellent job of blending those past and present events and events and characters from the series into a single cohesive ans satisfying whole I'm so pleased Severn House picked up and continues to publish this series; I'll keep buying them as long as Hambly keeps writing them


  6. says:

    There are precious few of the Benjamin January books that I haven't fully adored This one was not an exception but I don't think it was as drenched in its rendition of place as were some of the ones I've read previously And I found it rather convoluted with regard to the mystery But at long last we find out about Ben's first wife Aysha While I adore Rose I think that her character's reaction to the issues that her husband has regarding his first wife is not uite believable Still it was a good read just not the best


  7. says:

    As New Orleans reels from the economically devastating Panic of 1837 surgeon turned musician turned sometime detective Benjamin January a free man of color finds that the city's complex and dangerous social and racial hierarchy has been challenged by the arrival of an Ottoman diplomat he'd met a decade earlier in Paris When two women of the visitor's harem die mysteriously January correctly guesses that nothing bring scared angry people together faster than having an outsider on whom to pin a violent scandal


  8. says:

    There are so many prejudices in this world Skin color nationality religion all are used as an excuse to hate Ms Hambly in her novels shows how false and cruel such prejudices are This novel was full of excitement There were supposedly good men who thought nothing of using murder and lies to acuire riches There were truly good men who were accused of wrong doing as a cover up for another's crime Take your pick


  9. says:

    Not one of my favorite Benjamin January mysteries A bit slow and lagging in adventure like the others The back and forth was a bit confusing because there weren't headline type indicators to prepare your mind This story did have a good unusual plot; just needed umph Ms Hambly is such a good writer that it's a good read regardless


  10. says:

    It was so good to finally meet Ayasha after 10 books of Benjamin's stories about her It added a depth and a wistfulness to the book that I really loved


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Ran Away Benjamin January #11

free read Ran Away Benjamin January #11

Out of a window everyone was willing to believe him the murderer Only Benjamin January who knows the Turk of old is willing to seek for the true culprit endangering his own life in the process. Not one of my favorite Benjamin January mysteries A bit slow and lagging in adventure like the others The back and forth was a bit confusing because there weren't headline type indicators to prepare your mind This story did have a good unusual plot; just needed umph Ms Hambly is such a good writer that it's a good read regardless Himig Ng Sinag: MGA Piling Tula unusual plot; just needed The Test umph Ms Hambly is such a good writer that it's a good read regardless

summary ñ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ✓ Barbara Hambly

The new Benjamin January novel from the best selling author RAN AWAY So began a score of advertisements every week in the New Orleans newspapers advertising for slaves who’d fled their master. Another enjoyable book in this mystery series set in 1830’s New Orleans except about a third of this one takes place 10 years earlier when Benjamin Janvier is living in Paris and married to his first wife the dressmaker Ayasha It was very nice to read about their time together and Benjamin’s lasting grief is poignantA rich Turkish man a newcomer to New Orleans is accused of murdering his two concubines Benjamin knew the Turk in Paris their mutual adventures are described in that long flashback and tries to prove his innocenceThe book is full of amazing coincidences and last minute rescues but as always the atmosphere is wonderful and I’m very attached to these characters

Barbara Hambly ✓ 6 read

S But the Turk Hüseyin Pasha posted no such advertisement when his two lovely concubines disappeared And when a witness proclaimed he’d seen the “devilish infidel” hurl their dead bodies. There are precious few of the Benjamin January books that I haven't fully adored This one was not an exception but I don't think it was as drenched in its rendition of place as were some of the ones I've read previously And I found it rather convoluted with regard to the mystery But at long last we find out about Ben's first wife Aysha While I adore Rose I think that her character's reaction to the issues that her husband has regarding his first wife is not uite believable Still it was a good read just not the best