The Freak Observer Read & download é PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free

The Freak Observer

Read The Freak Observer

Cs and an unusual tough young woman Loa Lindgren When her yo. A story with a very strong voice a very fragile girl and a family that make you kind of grateful for what you haveI enjoyed the voice which reminded me of Speak and I did like being in Loa's headuntil I became bored Not bored of her but bored of the story Nothing was in order so I was constantly confused Was this before her friend died or after There's also uite a lot of talk about death and people's coping mechanisms It made for uite a depressing readMy main concern for the book was that mainly it was remembering the past without a whole lot of interaction Just Loa's take on everything I craved for her to have an actual conversation with someone that lasted than half a pageThis wasn't that kind of book and I couldn't uite finish it I tried I might try again But right now it gets 3 stars because though it was beautifully written in a 'stay inside a characters head' sort of way it wasn't the kind of book I personally enjoyDid make me go hug my dogs though

Summary Æ PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ↠ Blythe Woolston

Unger sister dies 16 year old Loa's clockwork galaxy collaps. In the months between when I put this book on my list to order for school and today when I read it I forgot why I ordered it I do remember that the heart and brain cover is what first attracted my attention because I still find the cover intriguing Good reviews and the Morris Award certainly played a part and I would definitely have read summaries within those reviews and on the book distributor's site Still when I pulled it out of my bag last night I wasn't sure what I was about to be reading and I approached it with a bit of trepidation because I was in the mood for something light and escapist than what I expected this to be Now that I've finished it I think I understand that a summary cannot adeuately describe the experience of reading this book And for me this was a book that was about my experiences of reading it rather than its plot or writing style or characterization though I like all of those things about it The Freak Observer immersed me in a period of time in the life of Loa while forcing me to look outward at the real world from the high school experience to current events to how other people might view parts of the bookLoa tells her story out of chronological order starting with her return to school following the death of her friend Esther and returning to fill us in on how that happened as well as some of the other recent tragedies in her life Asta her dog Ket her father's job Corey a bicycle accident But before you get to any of those tragedies you are thinking about the toilet plunger bruise on her jaw and thinking you know something about her life You're wrong There are no simple characterizations in this book These are some of the most frustratingly realistically complex people in fiction though Loa's love for and care of her younger brother and sister are almost saintlike and many parents would be pleased to have a child as helpful as Loa has generally beenI love the physics biology math and dream science problems or information at the start of each chapter They are interesting to think about in themselves and the way they introduce the ideas of their chapters and fit together as a whole is almost magical I love the inclusion of Stars at Tallapoosa though I do regret that it must be the English teacher who is heartless And the mention of the artists of the postcards Corey sends Loa are still references to look up and learn aboutWhen I finished chapter 12 I had to stop reading while I dealt with my anger over popular attitudes and perceptions of beneficiaries of social welfare programs which doesn't directly apply to the Lindgren family I challenge anyone to read this book and still be able to make offhand comments about the 47% I found myself wishing for a safety net for Loa's family Before reading chapter 14 I stopped to have a conversation about Dolly the sheep Then after reading it myself I read pages 115 116top aloud to my husband There is humor in this book but it's a dark and cynical humor Somewhere along the way I remembered Wendy Mass's book Pi in the Sky written for a very different audience and wondered if she has read this book which I think she'd likeWhile it seems as though this book may be unrelievedly depressing as Loa deals with grief than you'd think any teen could handle she is strong resilient intelligent and lucky So there is progression through the stages of grief and there is growth in her character and her family is not stagnant either I wasn't completely satisfied with the end of the book but I was satisfied and hopefulThis is a wonderful book for discussion because there's so much both within it and outside of it to talk about Unfortunately it isn't a book for middle schoolers and I'll have to console myself with the thought that some of my former students will enjoy it when I send it to the high school

Blythe Woolston ↠ 2 Characters

The Freak Observer is rich in family drama theoretical physi. So far as an English teacher I could criticize so many things about this book But if the author is reading this review out of curiousityI will temper my criticism with praise first I thought the physics problems at the beginning of each chapter were outstanding pieces of craft I'm a big fan of compositional risk and especially look for what has not been done before in a book I've never seen physics problems as a way to introduce chapters in a realistic fiction book The writer scores points for that However I was a lazy reader and didn't really stop to connect the dots on how each chapter intro connected with all the others but I can see that they connect as brilliantly as constellations This is the kind of book you have to actually think about if you fast read you're not going to get the subtleties When I re read I will look at the connections between chapter intros closely I'd love to assign that as a student project but some of the book's content is inappropriate and so I would ask for parent's permission before even recommending it I like to be as realistic as realistic fictionand yes this book has the infamous F word in it as well as s t and the other detriments to our vocabulary It also has though not explicit 1 or 2 adult content references The author could've deleted this easily it was uneccesary for this to be included the book was good enough without it However we all know that in real life you're going to hear profanity We all know what young adults are being taught in health class That being said just because these things are realistic doesn't make the book seem any realistic to me First off there are way too many conflicts Without spoiling the book by revealing specifics conflicts include death mental illness terminal illness underage drinking poverty etc etc And the problems are solved way too easily with a snap decision from Dad that came out of nowhere His answer to it all is to start over people in real life can't just start over The standard writer's motto is Write about what you know and sorry to say I don't believe this author knows what it's like to suffer from PTSD I do realize that PTSD can manifest itself in different ways but I speak from experience when I say that PTSD involves much than just having nightmares Although I found Loa's nightmare seuences to be fascinating probably the best writing in the book her inner thoughts didn't ring true to me and I can't uite put my finger on why The relationships between characters also seemed hollow Yes relationships become strained after a traumtic eventbut to really make that breakdown effective you have to establish that there was in fact a relationship to begin with I never saw it much in the book not between Loa and her siblings Loa and her parents Loa and her friends The closest relationship was between Loa and Corey and as a lover of horror I was pleasantly Pleased by Corey's psychotic postcards from Europe The Hanging Tree (English Edition) each chapter were outstanding pieces of craft I'm a big fan of compositional risk and W cieniu prawa / Czarna Madonna / Świt, który nie nadejdzie especially look for what has not been done before in a book I've never seen physics problems as a way to introduce chapters in a realistic fiction book The writer scores points for that However I was a lazy reader and didn't really stop to connect the dots on how Ajax the Warrior each chapter intro connected with all the others but I can see that they connect as brilliantly as constellations This is the kind of book you have to actually think about if you fast read you're not going to get the subtleties When I re read I will look at the connections between chapter intros closely I'd love to assign that as a student project but some of the book's content is inappropriate and so I would ask for parent's permission before Becoming Victoria even recommending it I like to be as realistic as realistic fictionand yes this book has the infamous F word in it as well as s t and the other detriments to our vocabulary It also has though not The Picture of Dorian Gray explicit 1 or 2 adult content references The author could've deleted this Karatay Diyetiyle Beslenme Tuzaklarından Kurtuluş Rehberi easily it was uneccesary for this to be included the book was good Afterlife enough without it However we all know that in real life you're going to hear profanity We all know what young adults are being taught in health class That being said just because these things are realistic doesn't make the book seem any realistic to me First off there are way too many conflicts Without spoiling the book by revealing specifics conflicts include death mental illness terminal illness underage drinking poverty Estructura Economica Mundial (Spanish Edition) etc ほんと野獣 7 [Honto Yajuu 7] etc And the problems are solved way too Chopin: Mazurkas for the Piano, Complete, Alfred Masterwork Edition, Practical Performing Edition easily with a snap decision from Dad that came out of nowhere His answer to it all is to start over people in real life can't just start over The standard writer's motto is Write about what you know and sorry to say I don't believe this author knows what it's like to suffer from PTSD I do realize that PTSD can manifest itself in different ways but I speak from Scalped, Vol. 6: The Gnawing experience when I say that PTSD involves much than just having nightmares Although I found Loa's nightmare seuences to be fascinating probably the best writing in the book her inner thoughts didn't ring true to me and I can't uite put my finger on why The relationships between characters also seemed hollow Yes relationships become strained after a traumtic Abuse of Power - Revenge of the Karinovs eventbut to really make that breakdown CLANS AND CHIEFS - Celtic Tribalism in Scotland effective you have to Strapdown Inertial Navigation Technology, 2nd Edition (IEE Radar, Sonar, Navigation and Avionics Series) establish that there was in fact a relationship to begin with I never saw it much in the book not between Loa and her siblings Loa and her parents Loa and her friends The closest relationship was between Loa and Corey and as a lover of horror I was pleasantly Pleased by Corey's psychotic postcards from Europe


10 thoughts on “The Freak Observer

  1. says:

    Okay this won me over just when I got so fed up with the relentlessly sad life the narrator Loa is living seriously I just about lost it when the dog dies in the story things start to improve for her; yes it improves slowly and it's only a little bit a glimmer but that's realistic and doesn't undercut all of the reasons for her PTSD and depression Also I love a non linear character driven story so the structure and the voice held me through the rough patchesStill if it wasn't for Woolston's writing I never would have gotten past the first 90 pages I don't normally enjoy reading such sad stories and I can't really say I enjoyed this one but I'm glad I finished it It felt meaningful There were just too many sharp wry observant passages I was marking off with sticky notes to stop reading and I'm glad that the story ends on a uietly hopeful note This is the kind of book I will think about long after finishing and probably read again to catch all the nuances I missed the first time around longer review later possiblyHere's three of my favorite snarky uotations which I couldn't resist including here I marked a lot of them but the others are too long for me to want to type them outOn friendship All friendships are uneual If they weren't power couldn't get swapped back and forth We would just hover in our self contained envelopes producing everything we need and eating our own shit 'Mmmm' we would say 'That's good shit' And we would all be perfectly happy and immortal like yeast p 72On her job working in the kitchen and dining room at the residential care center I did not have much in common with the cooks I am not a widow for example and I've never found my husband pinned under the axel after the rig he was working on slipped off the blocks I am not fascinated by whippets or Judge Judy or the guy in the blue and white trailer who is running a meth lab p 101On how nobody teaches about dreams in school There was that inspirational speaker who tore a phone book in half and told us to dream big but his message had nothing to do with our dream life while we sleep He was all about goals and I guess dislike for phone books p 126


  2. says:

    So far as an English teacher I could criticize so many things about this book But if the author is reading this review out of curiousityI will temper my criticism with praise first I thought the physics problems at the beginning of each chapter were outstanding pieces of craft I'm a big fan of compositional risk and especially look for what has not been done before in a book I've never seen physics problems as a way to introduce chapters in a realistic fiction book The writer scores points for that However I was a lazy reader and didn't really stop to connect the dots on how each chapter intro connected with all the others but I can see that they connect as brilliantly as constellations This is the kind of book you have to actually think about if you fast read you're not going to get the subtleties When I re read I will look at the connections between chapter intros closely I'd love to assign that as a student project but some of the book's content is inappropriate and so I would ask for parent's permission before even recommending it I like to be as realistic as realistic fictionand yes this book has the infamous F word in it as well as s t and the other detriments to our vocabulary It also has though not explicit 1 or 2 adult content references The author could've deleted this easily it was uneccesary for this to be included the book was good enough without it However we all know that in real life you're going to hear profanity We all know what young adults are being taught in health class That being said just because these things are realistic doesn't make the book seem any realistic to me First off there are way too many conflicts Without spoiling the book by revealing specifics conflicts include death mental illness terminal illness underage drinking poverty etc etc And the problems are solved way too easily with a snap decision from Dad that came out of nowhere His answer to it all is to start over people in real life can't just start over The standard writer's motto is Write about what you know and sorry to say I don't believe this author knows what it's like to suffer from PTSD I do realize that PTSD can manifest itself in different ways but I speak from experience when I say that PTSD involves much than just having nightmares Although I found Loa's nightmare seuences to be fascinating probably the best writing in the book her inner thoughts didn't ring true to me and I can't uite put my finger on why The relationships between characters also seemed hollow Yes relationships become strained after a traumtic eventbut to really make that breakdown effective you have to establish that there was in fact a relationship to begin with I never saw it much in the book not between Loa and her siblings Loa and her parents Loa and her friends The closest relationship was between Loa and Corey and as a lover of horror I was pleasantly Pleased by Corey's psychotic postcards from Europe


  3. says:

    Carolrhoda Lab for the win yet again Seriously I've been on top of this inprint since they debuted with DRAW THE DARK and TRAITOR and they've yet to publish anything even remotely resembling a word turd Their books are so rich and deep that you just get sucked right in and you don't even realize you were under water until you emerge breathless THE FREAK OBSERVER is no exceptionNow this is literary YA that I can sink my teeth into It's succinct but vibrant Loa doesn't pity herself even though she is probably someone that should The story is relatively plotless with Asta's death happening before the story even starts When you first enter you're walking into Loa's shit storm of a life without an umbrella and you can feel every ping and fleck of poo as it hurls at herThe main antagonist is someone that exists only in Loa's mind The Bony Guy Death He's always there haunting her keeping her alone in life And her loneliness is tangible Her parents don't see her as their child but as a burden especially when she falls out of line like getting hit by a car Such a bad kid Her only friend moves away but she finds something out about him that makes her doubt the relationship for most of the book Her little brother is kept at a distance by her parents as if they're afraid he'll catch something from her This girl leads such a loveless lonely life that you can't help but feel for herThe good thing as if there's only one is that Woolston doesn't drag the drama out for hundreds upon hundreds of pages The story is poignant telling the parts that need to be told for Loa's mind to get from point A to point B and then it's done And it's marvelous It's literary without the heinous door stopper fatIf you're jonsing for a phenomenal character driven story that's low on plot but amped up with a multi faceted character whose crutch is physics because it's the only dependable constant in her life you'll love THE FREAK OBSERVER I feel like all I'm doing is expounding on the fangirlishness with this review but it is that level of amazing It's a character study with a glimmer of hope at the end It's near hopeless but not uite Loa is one of the most amazing characters I've seen and to have gone through everything that she has it's a miracle she's not in the fetal position sucking her thumb by the end of the story No At the end she's standing up straighter than at the beginning And for that she's all the amazing


  4. says:

    Sometimes with books like this I can't bear to get through them I read like ten pages at a time I start another book all in hopes of avoiding a seemingly inevitable outcome that results in the horrible wasting away of the teenage protagonist And by books like this I mean books where the teenage protagonist just gets the shit kicked out of them physically and emotionally by lifeI guess I'm a bit of a coward like thatHowever in this book like that Blythe Woolston's The Freak Observer I didn't worry I read it all the way because as the storm of shit seeks to destroy Loa our sixteen year old protagonist I was utterly convinced that she would be fine Loa unlike a lot of the weak needy girls that appear throughout YA literature masuerading as heroines is a survivor And I mean a bloody survivor and not in the Destiny's Child sort of way that means wearing a lot of military inspired booty shorts and she's smart Emotionally intelligent and pretty gosh darn good at math and scienceFinally a book to pass along to my teenage girls that I'm not ashamed of


  5. says:

    A story with a very strong voice a very fragile girl and a family that make you kind of grateful for what you haveI enjoyed the voice which reminded me of Speak and I did like being in Loa's headuntil I became bored Not bored of her but bored of the story Nothing was in order so I was constantly confused Was this before her friend died or after? There's also uite a lot of talk about death and people's coping mechanisms It made for uite a depressing readMy main concern for the book was that mainly it was remembering the past without a whole lot of interaction Just Loa's take on everything I craved for her to have an actual conversation with someone that lasted than half a pageThis wasn't that kind of book and I couldn't uite finish it I tried I might try again But right now it gets 3 stars because though it was beautifully written in a 'stay inside a characters head' sort of way it wasn't the kind of book I personally enjoyDid make me go hug my dogs though


  6. says:

    One of those books that don't need a ratingThere's Holden and then there's Loa


  7. says:

    Original review posted on The Book Smugglers HEREThe Freak Observer is the 2011 winner of the William C Morris Award This award is given by YALSA to a debut book published by a first time author writing for young adults and I have decided to try and read all of this year’s nominees So far I’ve read Hold Me Closer Necromancer by Lish McBride which didn’t work for me and Guardian of the Dead by Karen Healey which I loved without reservations The Freak Observer falls somewhere in between those two for me It is clearly a very good book an excellent debut and I liked it – but I have to say that it didn’t completely wow meLoa Lindgren is having a terrible time she just witnessed a close friend’s death in a car accident and has been having nightmares and panic attacks ever since This is only the tip of the iceberg though as Loa’s disjointed narrative back and forth back and forth will eventually disclose Financial disaster has hit Loa’s family hard and she and her mother have to work while her father tries to find any work available And all of that come in the aftermath of her younger sister Asta’s death a year before from Rett Syndrome a neurodevelopmental disorder where development is normal for the first 6–18 months of a child’s life stagnating and regressing thereafterThe story then revolves around Loa and her family trying to find their way again after living so many years orbiting around Asta who was effectively the centre of their family life To speak of “revolving” and “orbit” is uite a propos since what keeps Loa marginally grounded and sane is her love for physics and maths At school she gets to work on a special physics project about Freak Observers – a hypothesised self aware entity that pops up in the universe to make sense of the chaos She works on the project as she reminisces about the past year all the while fighting severe PTSD paranoia nightmares having visions of death with little to no help as her parents have their own problems and they don’t have money to afford treatment Loa herself needs to be her own Freak Observer of her own small universe and make sense of the reining chaos in her lifeMore than that though the reader too has to be a Freak Observer too as the narrative is as fragmented a Loa’s brain seem to be Perhaps this might explain the causal distance I felt when reading the novel Maybe Loa’s narrative and life being too fragmentary and almost emotionless is what kept me from being wowed I don’t know I do know this is strictly a “me” thing and I do know that those very ualifiers fragmented narrative and lack of emotion are expertly incorporated as symptoms of Loa’s PTSD – as both story and storytelling I do appreciate that as I appreciated many other things about the novel Like the lovely writing for example Ghosts are mostly habits of memory In an old house like this everything you touch is connected to another moment The cupboard is full of ghosts The bookmarks between pages are ghosts The photographs of my unattractive ancestors on the wall are most certainly ghosts Even the morning glories that grow by the back porch are ghosts My mom plants them every year She soaks the little black seeds and nicks them with a nail file so they will be able to crack open and grow She plants them because there were morning glories blooming the day she came to the houseI specially admired how the author deftly allowed the reader to feel an immense sympathy for Loa’s parents who at first might come across as abusers The book opens as Loa’s father hits her with a toilet brush When Loa has an accident and ends up in hospital her mother’s first reaction is to wonder about how they are going to pay for the bill As the story progresses it is easy to see how both are simply good loving people struggling with the terrible thing that has happened to their child and dire financial distress and doing regretful things as a result These are not excuses but explanations and in the end there is a sense that this family is moving forward in the process of healing and that includes Loa as well It is a sad story but also a beautiful and hopeful one You know the sort that wins well deserved awards


  8. says:

    In the months between when I put this book on my list to order for school and today when I read it I forgot why I ordered it I do remember that the heart and brain cover is what first attracted my attention because I still find the cover intriguing Good reviews and the Morris Award certainly played a part and I would definitely have read summaries within those reviews and on the book distributor's site Still when I pulled it out of my bag last night I wasn't sure what I was about to be reading and I approached it with a bit of trepidation because I was in the mood for something light and escapist than what I expected this to be Now that I've finished it I think I understand that a summary cannot adeuately describe the experience of reading this book And for me this was a book that was about my experiences of reading it rather than its plot or writing style or characterization though I like all of those things about it The Freak Observer immersed me in a period of time in the life of Loa while forcing me to look outward at the real world from the high school experience to current events to how other people might view parts of the bookLoa tells her story out of chronological order starting with her return to school following the death of her friend Esther and returning to fill us in on how that happened as well as some of the other recent tragedies in her life Asta her dog Ket her father's job Corey a bicycle accident But before you get to any of those tragedies you are thinking about the toilet plunger bruise on her jaw and thinking you know something about her life You're wrong There are no simple characterizations in this book These are some of the most frustratingly realistically complex people in fiction though Loa's love for and care of her younger brother and sister are almost saintlike and many parents would be pleased to have a child as helpful as Loa has generally beenI love the physics biology math and dream science problems or information at the start of each chapter They are interesting to think about in themselves and the way they introduce the ideas of their chapters and fit together as a whole is almost magical I love the inclusion of Stars at Tallapoosa though I do regret that it must be the English teacher who is heartless And the mention of the artists of the postcards Corey sends Loa are still references to look up and learn aboutWhen I finished chapter 12 I had to stop reading while I dealt with my anger over popular attitudes and perceptions of beneficiaries of social welfare programs which doesn't directly apply to the Lindgren family I challenge anyone to read this book and still be able to make offhand comments about the 47% I found myself wishing for a safety net for Loa's family Before reading chapter 14 I stopped to have a conversation about Dolly the sheep Then after reading it myself I read pages 115 116top aloud to my husband There is humor in this book but it's a dark and cynical humor Somewhere along the way I remembered Wendy Mass's book Pi in the Sky written for a very different audience and wondered if she has read this book which I think she'd likeWhile it seems as though this book may be unrelievedly depressing as Loa deals with grief than you'd think any teen could handle she is strong resilient intelligent and lucky So there is progression through the stages of grief and there is growth in her character and her family is not stagnant either I wasn't completely satisfied with the end of the book but I was satisfied and hopefulThis is a wonderful book for discussion because there's so much both within it and outside of it to talk about Unfortunately it isn't a book for middle schoolers and I'll have to console myself with the thought that some of my former students will enjoy it when I send it to the high school


  9. says:

    I find it weird that nobody teaches us about dreams in school You'd think it would come up at some point like maybe in health class or something but it doesn't There was that inspirational speaker who tore a phone book in half and told us to dream big but his message had nothing to do with our dream life while we sleep He was all about goals and I guess dislike for phone booksLoa's life has been filled with heartache and loss Most recently she was present for the death of a high school classmate in a truck accident; the images and aftereffects of that event are added to the earlier loss of Loa's little sister Astafrom Rett Syndrome a neurodevelopmental disorder whose death tore the foundation out from under her family Loa now suffers from PTSD and works to avoid sleep as much as possible so she can escape the death related hallucinations and dreams that haunt her Her family is in dire financial straits and while Loa hopes for a normal childhood for her little brother Harold she knows that he's had to grow up far too soon Without Asta Loa and her family have lost their center and as individuals they are now spinning off on their own orbits The notion of astrophysics and math figure prominently in this novel as Woolston introduces each chapter with a complex physics problemuestion Loa is a keen observer of those around her much like the Freak Observer she chooses to write about for extra credit in physics class A Freak Observer is a random self made entity that basically pops up in the universe outside of any established system to make sense of the chaos Loa does the same and even though she tries mightily to make sense of her chaos it appears overwhelming at times I found this a tough read initially because Woolston's representation of Loa's reality often reflects the fragmented nature of Loa's PTSD Loa feels that everything is crashing down upon her after her sister's death but she slowly comes to realize that she may have some power over her reality as well This an absolutely heartbreaking book in parts and even the characters that initially appear unsympathetic like Loa's father are developed to the point where readers can easily identify with them I was constantly reminded of AS King's writing style throughout this book the same vivid language alternating long short paragraphs used to great effect and strongly drawn narrative voices It's a short novel but you'll still want to take your time and soak in the language


  10. says:

    Em's Review My new favorite word which feels kind of funny in my mouth? Orrery An Orrery is a mechanical model of the solar system Loa Lindgren’s family once worked like a science fair prize worthy orrery Our gears turned so smoothly and all the parts fit together so perfectly At the center of their family orbit was her baby sister Asta taking the place of the sun in this metaphor and the family’s life worked around their sun like the clockwork of an orrery no one ever went missing like a rogue comet But what happens to the orbiting planets when the sun dies?And this is where we meet Loa one of the most uniue and memorable characters I have read in recent years Loa has been suffering from PTSD since the death of her baby sister – she has nightmares tries her best not to sleep and sees things that aren’t there She tries to not think about her sister believing that picking at a wound just makes it harder to heal But when The Bony Guy takes the life of her friend Esther or does she take her own life? it becomes increasingly hard to ignore how death has impacted her as she figures out her place in the universeAs I read I had no idea where the story was going but this lack of foresight didn’t affect the momentum and actually added uite a bit to the experience It would almost seem unfair for the reader to have too much of an idea of Loa’s path as she’s struggling to find her way back into orbit The story is much about character development than plot points anyway Stuff happens but the driving force is Loa and how she makes sense of events in her past and her present Woolston’s writing style and story structure choices as well as all of the uirky – at times funny at times mind boggling – physics references make for an enjoyable and memorable read albeit the depressing story The overall design of the book also adds to the charm of Woolston’s debut YA novel


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *