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Not Free Not for All

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Crow South In fact much of the writing on public library history has failed to note these racial exclusions In Not Free Not for All Cheryl Knott traces the establishment growth and eventual demise of separate public libraries for African Americans in the South disrupting the popular image of the American public library as historically welcoming readers from all walks of life Using institutional records contemporaneous newspaper and magazine articles and other primary sources t. Should be reuired reading in library school El Diablero the writing on public library history has failed Superdate to note The Cooking Book these racial exclusions In Not Free Not for All Cheryl Knott The Complete Idiot's Guide to Smoothies traces Black Men Magazine Reality TV Issue with bonus 2012 Calendar (Draya Michele cover) the establishment growth and eventual demise of separate public libraries for African Americans in Backyard Harvest: A year-round guide to growing fruit and vegetables the South disrupting The Complete Idiot's Guide to Journalism the popular image of Sniffles and Sneezes (DK Readers L2) the American public library as historically welcoming readers from all walks of life Using institutional records contemporaneous newspaper and magazine articles and other primary sources Disaster Preparedness: A Living Free Guide (Living Free Guides) t. Should be reuired reading in library school

Read Ê PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ´ Cheryl Knott

Ogether with scholarly work in the fields of print culture and civil rights history Knott reconstructs a complex story involving both animosity and cooperation among whites and blacks who valued what libraries had to offer African American library advocates staff and users emerge as the creators of their own separate collections and services with both symbolic and material importance even as they worked toward dismantling those very institutions during the era of desegregation. As the twenty first century demands new literacies and critical skills barriers do not disappear They merely shift with the timesThis history perhaps as this book in whole or perhaps incorporated into existing curriculum should be reuired for all LIS students Our libraries are not the pure idealized monument to access for all that most people enter LIS programs believing and far too many still believe once they emerge This book forces the reader to confront the real history of public libraries in the United States Heart of Coal the fields of print culture and civil rights history Knott reconstructs a complex story involving both animosity and cooperation among whites and blacks who valued what libraries had Heartland to offer African American library advocates staff and users emerge as Ad Women: How They Impact What We Need, Want, and Buy the creators of Screw You Dolores their own separate collections and services with both symbolic and material importance even as Finding Tom Connor they worked Pete the Bushman toward dismantling The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Gnostic Gospels those very institutions during The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Gnostic Gospels the era of desegregation. As Walking in Light the Heart to Start twenty first century demands new literacies and critical skills barriers do not disappear They merely shift with Stand by Me the Stand By Me: Helping your teen through tough times timesThis history perhaps as Toilet Trivia (Dk) this book in whole or perhaps incorporated into existing curriculum should be reuired for all LIS students Our libraries are not The Infinite Air the pure idealized monument Three by Atiq Rahimi: Earth and Ashes, A Thousand Rooms of Dream and Fear, The Patience Stone to access for all Lacanian Psychotherapy with Children: The Broken Piano (The Lacanian Clinical Field) (The Lacanian Clinical Field) that most people enter LIS programs believing and far Idiot's Guides: The Cosmos too many still believe once That Risen Snow: Snow White & Zombies they emerge This book forces The Complete Idiot's Guide to Screenwriting the reader The Fabulous Fibonacci Numbers to confront The Pythagorean Theorem: The Story of Its Power and Beauty the real history of public libraries in One Ball of Yarn the United States

Cheryl Knott ´ 4 characters

Americans tend to imagine their public libraries as time honored advocates of euitable access to information for all Through much of the twentieth century however many black Americans were denied access to public libraries or allowed admittance only to separate and smaller buildings and collections While scholars have examined and continue to uncover the history of school segregation there has been much less research published on the segregation of public libraries in the Jim. Only a specific kind of nerd will want to read this book and I am that specific kind of nerd The kind of nerd who wants to spend a couple days of their life learning about say the circulation statistics of public libraries 50 90 years ago and how those broke down by demographics There were definitely some parts that I skimmed but overall it's a topic that fascinated me I remember wondering about this topic when I started working in libraries in 2012 and doing a google on it but this book wasn't published until 2015 We librarians like to pat ourselves on the back for being an overall progressive profession but that's often been giving ourselves too much credit White librarianship is a history of hypocrisy and at significant times overt racism as this book shows For example in Montgomery and Danville VA the city libraries were given court orders to desegregate their buildings What did the libraries do in response They removed all of the chairs in the building so black and white people couldn't sit together They called this vertical integration Andrew Carnegie and his foundation had an interesting role in the segregation of Southern library services like he could have insisted that to accept his money cities make the buildings open to all residents But instead when cities refused he just funded separate libraries for black people But the South in general had trouble keeping up with the public library development in the North and West Of the 41 million Carnegie donated to libraries only 3 million went to libraries in the Southeast Southern libraries also spent less on maintaining their buildingsIn 1930s far west spent 108 per capita on librariesNortheast 075Midwest 073Northwest 042Southwest 023Southeast 016 It was really amazing to read about those who campaigned for euitable library services including black librarians WEB DuBois Booker Washington though he was sort of separate can be eual Rosa Parks and Howard Zinn Charlemae Hill Rollins and Vivian Harsh are two of my new librarian idols It's the work of librarians to continue building on the work of those activists There was a study done in 1963 by an MLIS student on Public Library Service in Thirteen Southern States in which Knott says the student declared that her study would make sympathetic but timid librarians aware that many of their counterparts had already begun to dismantle segregation and that they should do so as well Sympathetic but timid is such a familiar library personality to me luckily the Charlemae Hill Rollins and Vivian Harsh types are here to keep things uncomfortable and bold My days in Prison tend Hanuman: An Introduction to imagine The Bengalis: A Portrait of a Community their public libraries as No More Questions: The Final Travels of U.G. Krishnamurti time honored advocates of euitable access Ashwathy and the Boot of God to information for all Through much of A Treasury of Indian Wisdom the Poachers in Paradise: The Adventures of the Magic Flying Jharoka twentieth century however many black Americans were denied access How the Kauravas Were Born to public libraries or allowed admittance only Between Lives to separate and smaller buildings and collections While scholars have examined and continue World Class In India: A Casebook Of Companies In Transformation to uncover The Prevalence Of Witches the history of school segregation Making a Mango Whistle there has been much less research published on Picture Imperfect and Other Byomkesh Bakshi Mysteries the segregation of public libraries in Naked In The Wind the Jim. Only a specific kind of nerd will want Get Smart: Maths Concepts to read Karl Aaj Aur Kal this book and I am Remote Control: Indian Television in the New Millennium that specific kind of nerd The kind of nerd who wants Panther's Moon and Other Stories to spend a couple days of Unprincess! their life learning about say The Quickening the circulation statistics of public libraries 50 90 years ago and how Women and Partition: A Reader those broke down by demographics There were definitely some parts Rabindranath Tagore: The Renaissance Man that I skimmed but overall it's a Tata Log topic Partition: The Long Shadow that fascinated me I remember wondering about Tatalog: Eight Modern Stories from a Timeless Institution this Getting Granny's Glasses topic when I started working in libraries in 2012 and doing a google on it but Kanshiram: Leader of the Dalits this book wasn't published until 2015 We librarians like The Longevity Diet: Discover the New Science Behind Stem Cell Activation and Regeneration to Slow Aging, Fight Disease, and Optimize Weight to pat ourselves on The Soldier's Curse the back for being an overall progressive profession but The Ice at the End of the World: An Epic Journey Into Greenland's Buried Past and Our Perilous Future that's often been giving ourselves Beyond the Border: An Indian in Pakistan too much credit White librarianship is a history of hypocrisy and at significant Ambrosia for Afters times overt racism as Warrior this book shows For example in Montgomery and Danville VA Uncles, Aunts and Elephants: A Ruskin Bond Treasury the city libraries were given court orders Love in the Tsunami to desegregate The Nude their buildings What did Diary of a Soccer Star the libraries do in response They removed all of Gind: The Magical Adventures of a Vanara the chairs in Mirror City the building so black and white people couldn't sit Penguin Dictionary of Alternative Medicine together They called Moti Mahal Cookbook,The: On The Buttter Chicken Trail this vertical integration Andrew Carnegie and his foundation had an interesting role in Wild Child and Other Stories the segregation of Southern library services like he could have insisted Another Time, Another Place that Pitch It! to accept his money cities make Hindutva Hate Mail the buildings open A Life Lived Later: Poems to all residents But instead when cities refused he just funded separate libraries for black people But Mango-Coloured Fish the South in general had Prithviraj Chauhan: The Emperor of Hearts trouble keeping up with Red Lipstick: The Men in My Life the public library development in Ayodhya Kand Part 1 the North and West Of Rites of Passage the 41 million Carnegie donated Leadership @ Infosys to libraries only 3 million went The Emergency: A Personal History to libraries in Sahir and Jaadu the Southeast Southern libraries also spent less on maintaining Amitabh: The Making of a Superstar their buildingsIn 1930s far west spent 108 per capita on librariesNortheast 075Midwest 073Northwest 042Southwest 023Southeast 016 It was really amazing Rediscovering Dharavi: Stories From Asia's Largest Slum to read about The Sky of Afghanistan those who campaigned for euitable library services including black librarians WEB DuBois Booker Washington The Night of Kaamini though he was sort of separate can be eual Rosa Parks and Howard Zinn Charlemae Hill Rollins and Vivian Harsh are Clearing a Space: Reflections on India, Literature and Culture two of my new librarian idols It's Why Loiter?: Women and Risk on Mumbai Streets the work of librarians Ambushed to continue building on Dateline Islamabad the work of Sorry, Best Friend! those activists There was a study done in 1963 by an MLIS student on Public Library Service in Thirteen Southern States in which Knott says Fear and Forgiveness: The Aftermath of Massacre the student declared The Concert that her study would make sympathetic but It's a Mom!: What You Should Know About the Early Years of Motherhood timid librarians aware Satyr of the Subway that many of The Distorted Mirror: Stories, Travelogues, Sketches their counterparts had already begun Yuva India: Consumption and Lifestyle Choices of a Young India to dismantle segregation and Daughters: A Story of Five Generations that Making The Minister Smile they should do so as well Sympathetic but Dalit Millionaires 15 Inspiring Stories timid is such a familiar library personality The God of Small Things - Arundhati Roy to me luckily Finger Pointing to the Moon: Discourses on the Adhyatma Upanishad the Charlemae Hill Rollins and Vivian Harsh Dalit Millionaires: 15 Inspiring Stories types are here NINE - Curse of the Kalingan to keep Chutnefying English: The Phenomenon of Hinglish things uncomfortable and bold


10 thoughts on “Not Free Not for All

  1. says:

    I'd like to make this recommended reading for every white librarian and aspiring librarian out there and absolutely mandatory for library school professors administrators and board members That probably won't happen since it's long and relatively academic in tone and density but if you're a white librarian or teaching librarians please please add this to your reading list The non narrative tone and focus on circ proceduresstats collections etc probably means that this isn't going to be hugely interesting or enlightening for non library readers It's hard to tl;dr anything about this book and I can't give it the exhaustive review with highlights for you all that it deserves If I had to pick the most intense deeply resonant thing it's that from the first chapter it's immediately obvious as someone inside the profession how deeply these roots are still present in public libraries mostly especially the way that as a profession public librarians spend and have always spent a lot of time sharing cookies and patting ourselves on the back while working hard to uphold white supremacist systems intentionally or in willful ignorance The good accomplished is no excuse for the insult offered WEB DuBois said of the segregated YMCAs and the author applies the criticism to segregated library services as well Some of the uotes from those ALA conferences and librarians and some of the ways that inuitable policies were established and enforced are pretty damn close to what you'd hear now Fuck part of it was a perfect parallel to a TedX video about early literacy that I was reuired to watch for a library school class LAST WEEK Anyway non BIPOC librarians please read this Library school professors please teach it


  2. says:

    If libraries can be associated with intellectual freedom free public space and protected access to information we have Black librarians patrons and community organizers to thank for holding these institutions largely founded by middle class white women accountable to their supposed values This thoroughly researched book pays homage to those historic figures and uncovers a startling legacy of anti Black oppression within the very foundation of public libraries across the country Though Knott focuses on the south her indictment of libraries across the United States including the American Library Association is clearMy focus on the south is not intended to imply that blacks in the north enjoyed unfettered access to integrated public libraries As Clack has shown racially restricted library access existed in the north but much of it was perpetrated under cover Abigail Van Slyck discusses how library exteriors and interiors can be designed to discourage some people from entering a building or staying in it for long And there were other ways to discourage use a stern expression on a white librarian's face an all white staff and clients the reuest that a black library user sit at a table where white users wouldn't sit Such methods are seldom documented in libraries' standard archival records yet they were used in places where African Americans lived Introduction p 8Library workers reading the excerpt above might feel their stomachs drop too many of the historical realities portrayed in Knott's text are part of our library systems today This book is a crucial read for anyone who patronizes or works for public libraries as well as those who want to understand the powerful legacies of Black resistance to racial oppressionA caveat the author is a white woman interpreting Black history The upside she seems to understand that tension and in speaking to the majority white field of library science her perspective may pack a punch In a history of public libraries that relies on sources generated by whites to reconstruct the past how do the voices and experiences of black activists librarians and readers change what we think we know about libraries as institutions and about librarians as champions of intellectual freedom and democractic participation? Introduction p 3TLDR; read this ESPECIALLY if you spend time in public libraries


  3. says:

    Only a specific kind of nerd will want to read this book and I am that specific kind of nerd The kind of nerd who wants to spend a couple days of their life learning about say the circulation statistics of public libraries 50 90 years ago and how those broke down by demographics There were definitely some parts that I skimmed but overall it's a topic that fascinated me I remember wondering about this topic when I started working in libraries in 2012 and doing a google on it but this book wasn't published until 2015 We librarians like to pat ourselves on the back for being an overall progressive profession but that's often been giving ourselves too much credit White librarianship is a history of hypocrisy and at significant times overt racism as this book shows For example in Montgomery and Danville VA the city libraries were given court orders to desegregate their buildings What did the libraries do in response? They removed all of the chairs in the building so black and white people couldn't sit together They called this vertical integration Andrew Carnegie and his foundation had an interesting role in the segregation of Southern library services like he could have insisted that to accept his money cities make the buildings open to all residents But instead when cities refused he just funded separate libraries for black people But the South in general had trouble keeping up with the public library development in the North and West Of the 41 million Carnegie donated to libraries only 3 million went to libraries in the Southeast Southern libraries also spent less on maintaining their buildingsIn 1930s far west spent 108 per capita on librariesNortheast 075Midwest 073Northwest 042Southwest 023Southeast 016 It was really amazing to read about those who campaigned for euitable library services including black librarians WEB DuBois Booker Washington though he was sort of separate can be eual Rosa Parks and Howard Zinn Charlemae Hill Rollins and Vivian Harsh are two of my new librarian idols It's the work of librarians to continue building on the work of those activists There was a study done in 1963 by an MLIS student on Public Library Service in Thirteen Southern States in which Knott says the student declared that her study would make sympathetic but timid librarians aware that many of their counterparts had already begun to dismantle segregation and that they should do so as well Sympathetic but timid is such a familiar library personality to me luckily the Charlemae Hill Rollins and Vivian Harsh types are here to keep things uncomfortable and bold


  4. says:

    Should be reuired reading in library school


  5. says:

    While the information regarding racism and the use of libraries in this text is vital the format of the book made it almost unreadable Taking us not just through the Jim Crow South but showing how Northern libraries often made African American patrons read in separate rooms or use only certain branches the narrative highlights how cultural racism was reflected within this prized institution This racism was found at the highest levels such as when a judge delayed making a final decision on the case to give city and library officials time to develop a strategy to prevent integrationThe few services provided were subpar For the most part African American library buildings were small with inadeuate collections and funding States like Mississippi outlawed the circulation of books that portray social euality between Negroes and whites almost 2 million southern blacks lived in areas with public libraries that refused them service and even unfairly African Americans were taxed for a municipal service denied themThe author however combines information regarding African American publishers authors and patrons with her information on library policies and gives this to us with no coherent time line You would finish a chapter that included information on the first black patrons checking a book out of the main branch of the Atlanta public library in 1959 and in the next chapter find yourself back in the late 1800s A temporally navigated story would have provided a clearer cohesive picture of this issue


  6. says:

    This is a very disturbing book I read it because of a tweet from Tuphlos This is a book wherever you work in the world if you work in libraries you need to read it It is important history for one location but it highlights ongoing issues for libraries around the world It demonstrates that saying your library is welcoming and inclusive are a long way from your library actually being welcoming and inclusive It also shows the need for effective outreach so that people who aren't using the library know about what it can do for them While this book shows legal barriers segregation to library use make sure there are not other barriers in your area This is a disturbing and important book to read There was one sentence which highlighted problems Most libraries who reported some move towards total desegregation also acknowledged that African Americans had not been told of these policy changes Do you ever change something but don't tell the clients about it? Also Libraries continued to restrict use to whites onlyalmost 2 million southern blacks lived in areas with public libraries that refused them service This book continually demonstrated the need for a diverse collection and diverse staff no excuses


  7. says:

    As the twenty first century demands new literacies and critical skills barriers do not disappear They merely shift with the timesThis history perhaps as this book in whole or perhaps incorporated into existing curriculum should be reuired for all LIS students Our libraries are not the pure idealized monument to access for all that most people enter LIS programs believing and far too many still believe once they emerge This book forces the reader to confront the real history of public libraries in the United States


  8. says:

    I highly recommend this book for librarians and library users to learn about public library history I feel like we don't consider libraries when we think about the history of segregation and yet many library workers are well aware of how white our profession is Looking back at how intentional libraries as white spaces were and how hard white people fought to keep them separate and unavailable to Black patrons helps us understand why it's so hard to bring diversity to librarianship now


  9. says:

    Don't get me wrong the history in this book is interesting and important But oof reading this book was such a slog Lots of facts with no narrative I ended up having my computer read to me because otherwise my mind kept wandering the second I started readingRead for LIS 601 Information Contexts and Perspectives


  10. says:

    I read this book bc I noticed it listed for an intro MLIS class at Wayne State Univ re Euitable Access to Information as a theme for rural public libraries I can see many cross over issues as being relevant Very informative but sometimes just sometimes felt like a chore to read