The Wages of Wins Taking Measure of the Many Myths in Modern Sport Read ¶ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB

The Wages of Wins Taking Measure of the Many Myths in Modern Sport

Read The Wages of Wins Taking Measure of the Many Myths in Modern Sport

Ow examples based on their own academic research to debunk many of the most commonly held beliefs about sportsIn this updated version of their book these authors explain why Allen Iverson leaving Philadelphia made the 76ers a better team why the Yankees find it so hard to repeat their success from the late 1990s and why even great uarterbacks l In order to like this book you must be interested in two categories sports and economics Though the authors do not include the esoteric mathematical computations and formulae they use to come up with their conclusions they DO talk of the economics of sports to show how much of the accepted beliefs about economics and sports doesn't hold true and which of those beliefs do I found their breezy informal style lots of fun to read and though I have no training in economics I understood their clear accounts of their reasoning I learned a lot about how owners managers and coaches make their player decisions sometimes without basing those decisions on the economic truths they think they understand but really do not One problem the book's most recent figures and examples come from the 2004 sports seasons so as years go by the book will become dated Too bad It's readable and informative Lunastus it so hard to repeat their success from the late 1990s and why even great uarterbacks l In order to like this book you must be Timetrap interested Cache in two categories sports and economics Though the authors do not Cache include the esoteric mathematical computations and formulae they use to come up with their conclusions they DO talk of the economics of sports to show how much of the accepted beliefs about economics and sports doesn't hold true and which of those beliefs do I found their breezy The academic library informal style lots of fun to read and though I have no training The Cliterate Male: a Primer on Pleasuring Women (Good in Bed Guides) in economics I understood their clear accounts of their reasoning I learned a lot about how owners managers and coaches make their player decisions sometimes without basing those decisions on the economic truths they think they understand but really do not One problem the book's most recent figures and examples come from the 2004 sports seasons so as years go by the book will become dated Too bad It's readable and Pie: A Global History informative

Free download É eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB é David J. Berri

Ike Brett Favre are consistently inconsistent The book names names and makes it abundantly clear that much of the decision making of coaches and general managers does not hold up to an analysis of the numbers Whether you are a fantasy league fanatic or a casual weekend fan much of what you believe about sports will change after reading this boo Interesting read I am somewhat skeptical of some of the claims made without seeing the actual math The authors rely on regression modeling and without seeing the diagnosis of the regressions I cannot say their system is valid for example are the variables orthogonal or auto correlatedStill it is a fascinating look at a number of the myths in professional sports like lack of competitive balance Lunastus inconsistent The book names names and makes Timetrap it abundantly clear that much of the decision making of coaches and general managers does not hold up to an analysis of the numbers Whether you are a fantasy league fanatic or a casual weekend fan much of what you believe about sports will change after reading this boo Interesting read I am somewhat skeptical of some of the claims made without seeing the actual math The authors rely on regression modeling and without seeing the diagnosis of the regressions I cannot say their system Cache is valid for example are the variables orthogonal or auto correlatedStill Cache it The academic library is a fascinating look at a number of the myths The Cliterate Male: a Primer on Pleasuring Women (Good in Bed Guides) in professional sports like lack of competitive balance

David J. Berri é 7 Download

Named of one of Princeton University's Noteworthy Books in Industrial Relations for 2006Arguing about sports is as old as the games people play Over the years sports debates have become muddled by many myths that do not match the numbers generated by those playing the games In The Wages of Wins the authors use layman's language and easy to foll About half of the book was about their new way of computing the efficiency of an NBA player Once they developed this method they applied it to several different classic NBA uestions about what players and teams are best and what skills are overvalued While I believe that their metric is better than the official NBA efficiency measure they often compared it against I'm still not convinced that it's the best measure out there It's still too difficult to make a direct comparison between players on different teams and with different teammatesI'm even less convinced by their B score metric though I do think it's better than the NFL's passer rating formula Thus I don't really trust their results about the unpredictability of NFL Bs Maybe their inability to find trends is due to a poor metricOne of the other major topics was about competitive balance in different sports and I thought these sections were really interestingI'm definitely interested in reading about the studies they have done in detail They did a lot of hand waving when they got to the math and would generally stop at X was statistically significant Being aware of the many issues associated with statistical hypothesis testing I would need to read about each study to really gain confidence in their conclusions It was an interesting and fast read and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in sports economics But I'm still not sure what to make of many of their conclusions The Web and The Wing in Industrial Relations for 2006Arguing about sports The Web and The Wing is as old as the games people play Over the years sports debates have become muddled by many myths that do not match the numbers generated by those playing the games In The Wages of Wins the authors use layman's language and easy to foll About half of the book was about their new way of computing the efficiency of an NBA player Once they developed this method they applied Vernon Downs it to several different classic NBA uestions about what players and teams are best and what skills are overvalued While I believe that their metric An Alpha's Trust is better than the official NBA efficiency measure they often compared Yahweh's Wife: Sex in the Evolution of Monotheism : A Study of Yahweh, Asherah, Ritual Sodomy and Temple Prostitution (Woman in History) it against I'm still not convinced that The Love Child's Mother it's the best measure out there It's still too difficult to make a direct comparison between players on different teams and with different teammatesI'm even less convinced by their B score metric though I do think Shrouded Memory it's better than the NFL's passer rating formula Thus I don't really trust their results about the unpredictability of NFL Bs Maybe their The Gypsy's Song (Destiny's Consent) inability to find trends Titanic Lessons for It Projects is due to a poor metricOne of the other major topics was about competitive balance Prayers of the Eucharist: Early and Reformed: Texts Translated and Edited with Introductions in different sports and I thought these sections were really Dragon Age (Dragon Age 1) interestingI'm definitely Origins Rising interested Keteknikan Videografi: Membuat Film Pendek dan Video Iklan untuk SMK Semester 1 in reading about the studies they have done Beware a Scots Revenge (School for Heiresses, in detail They did a lot of hand waving when they got to the math and would generally stop at X was statistically significant Being aware of the many Humor Writing: Activities for the English Classroom issues associated with statistical hypothesis testing I would need to read about each study to really gain confidence The Dewdrops ... a journey begins in their conclusions It was an The Dewdrops ... a journey begins interesting and fast read and I'd recommend Bußpredigt: Ein Krimi aus dem Bayerischen Wald it to anyone Gëzofi folës dhe Luka i vogël interested Two Wheels and a Map in sports economics But I'm still not sure what to make of many of their conclusions


10 thoughts on “The Wages of Wins Taking Measure of the Many Myths in Modern Sport

  1. says:

    About all anyone needs to know on the readability of this one is that the day I signed up for GoodReads I was reading thistook me three different stages to get through it over a 9 month period The book take statistical and economic theories and applies it to some popular notions in sport The target audience is pretty miniscule just by that general description and the relatively few examples they actually take a look at coupled with the fact half of them weren't really widely held beliefs makes the target even smaller This isn't a fantasy sports type analysis so much as just a very heavy statistical analysis of a handful of does X cause Y type items usually related to salariesmoney My biggest problem with it overall was that in a number of cases they took a tact that really wasn't a full answer of the uestion the most telling was when they tried to show that the higher spending teams in baseball don't have a real competitive advantage by showing how a few of the non highest spenders won world series While they had some nifty statistics they left out the fact that the Yankees Red Sox and Braves three of the top 6 spenders most years took three of the 8 playoff spots for about 9 straight years Yes other teams may have beat them in the playoffs occasionally but there was definitely a correlation of getting to the playoffs and spending Just seemed pretty sloppy to miss things like that when droning on about coefficeints and deviants Gave it two stars instead of one cause some of it was pretty interesting for a person who loves sports and works with financialeconomic models a lot so the three of us in the country may have found it interesting


  2. says:

    About half of the book was about their new way of computing the efficiency of an NBA player Once they developed this method they applied it to several different classic NBA uestions about what players and teams are best and what skills are overvalued While I believe that their metric is better than the official NBA efficiency measure they often compared it against I'm still not convinced that it's the best measure out there It's still too difficult to make a direct comparison between players on different teams and with different teammatesI'm even less convinced by their B score metric though I do think it's better than the NFL's passer rating formula Thus I don't really trust their results about the unpredictability of NFL Bs Maybe their inability to find trends is due to a poor metricOne of the other major topics was about competitive balance in different sports and I thought these sections were really interestingI'm definitely interested in reading about the studies they have done in detail They did a lot of hand waving when they got to the math and would generally stop at X was statistically significant Being aware of the many issues associated with statistical hypothesis testing I would need to read about each study to really gain confidence in their conclusions It was an interesting and fast read and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in sports economics But I'm still not sure what to make of many of their conclusions


  3. says:

    I find the idea fascinating because I love using numbers to show people who 'just know' that their limited frame of reference is hindering them from 'seeing the truth' That having been said I prefer the web site which admittedly I visited first because I am really just concerned with basketball The book covers lots of sports and the web site seems to focus on individual posts that I can sink my teeth into However perhaps the greatest analysis in the book is the basketball section where the author demonstrates the strong correlation between a person's scoring and their relative over valuation based on that sole attribute I also loved how he talked about 'chemistry' and that a lot of time it felt that this nebulous term was really masking the fact that people had overvalued a player based on his ability to solely score and when that individual had been replaced suddenly his replacement who usually scores less but is a better player is part of the chemistry resurgence associated with better results In fact 'chemistry' wasn't the problem but management and the general attitude of the league which overvalues a scorer who brings nothing else to the table Yes Ben Gordon I AM looking at you


  4. says:

    Wages of Wins is mostly an attempt at coming up with a solid metric to assess basketball performance Unfortunately Berri's metric wins produced is full of holes To begin with Berri makes the fatally flawed assumption that individual contributions should always be assessed at the team level; an economist should know better For instance yes it's true that offensive and defensive rebounds produce the same result a possession but since two of the three nearest rebounders are going to be defensive players the marginal value of an offensive rebound is higher This and a lot of other flaws are lost on Berri and he seems absolutely convinced that his method is completely right which is bothersome Further Berri's team adjustment is a massive fudge factor Any metric could correlate as well with winning as his does with such a factor There is some solid work on how winning and maruee players affect attendance and on the value of NFL uarterbacks but that's about all that I can recommend about Wages of Wins


  5. says:

    In order to like this book you must be interested in two categories sports and economics Though the authors do not include the esoteric mathematical computations and formulae they use to come up with their conclusions they DO talk of the economics of sports to show how much of the accepted beliefs about economics and sports doesn't hold true and which of those beliefs do I found their breezy informal style lots of fun to read and though I have no training in economics I understood their clear accounts of their reasoning I learned a lot about how owners managers and coaches make their player decisions sometimes without basing those decisions on the economic truths they think they understand but really do not One problem the book's most recent figures and examples come from the 2004 sports seasons so as years go by the book will become dated Too bad It's readable and informative


  6. says:

    Didn't get through the whole thing Some of the chapters I just didn't find that interesting The chapters on basketball statistics were good but I disagreed with some of their conclusions The problem with their statistical model is that I think it confuses causation with correlation For instance I think being a good defensive rebounder is often correlated with being a good defender but one does not always follow the other David Lee for instance is a terrific rebounder but by most accounts a poor defender I think this model gives him to much credit and too little credit to a player like Kirk Hinrich who defends well but doesn't rebound a lot Also a few parts of this book already felt outdated


  7. says:

    Interesting read I am somewhat skeptical of some of the claims made without seeing the actual math The authors rely on regression modeling and without seeing the diagnosis of the regressions I cannot say their system is valid for example are the variables orthogonal or auto correlated?Still it is a fascinating look at a number of the myths in professional sports like lack of competitive balance


  8. says:

    This book looks at sports in a very statistical way and tries to look at what is really important to winning games from a statistical view This book gets really into the number side of things and I think that they view the metrics that they created as if they are the end all be all of statistical measures but an interesting viewpoint nonetheless However the claim that Allen Iverson was the 90th best player in the league during the year that he won the MVP is patently ridiculous


  9. says:

    A trio of economists try to recreate the feel of Freakonomics in the world of sports by collecting articles previously published in scientific journals and adding a few jokes As someone who has spent way to much time reading about these sorts of ideas online this book wasn't really for me If you're interested in sports and are just digging into statistical analysis then this might be a good jump start but I felt I was being talked down to just a little


  10. says:

    Warning Not for everyone The Wages of Wins takes place at the odd intersection of sports statistics and economics The authors work hard to determine effective methods for measuring the value of individual players on a team It doesn't have a storyline like Michael Lewis's Moneyball; it's of an academic appraisal I liked it but I also liked microeconomics so take that how you will