SUMMARY Ë Chuckwalla Land The Riddle of California's Desert

Chuckwalla Land The Riddle of California's Desert

READ Chuckwalla Land The Riddle of California's Desert

Is freuent forays to Death Valley Red Rock Canyon Kelso Dunes and other locales Wallace illuminates the desert’s intriguing flora and fauna as he explores a controversial unresolved scientific debate about the origin and evolution of its unusual ecosystems Eminent scientists and scholars appear throughout these pa

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Ges including maverick paleobiologist Daniel Axelrod botanist Ledyard Stebbins and naturalists Edmund Jaeger and Joseph Wood Krutch Weaving together ecology geology natural history and mythology in his characteristically elouent voice Wallace reveals that there is to this starkly beautiful landscape than meets the e The Accidental Giant paleobiologist Daniel Axelrod botanist Ledyard Stebbins and naturalists Edmund Jaeger and Joseph Wood Krutch Weaving together ecology geology natural history and mythology in his characteristically elouent voice Wallace reveals that there is to this starkly beautiful landscape than meets the e

David Rains Wallace Ú 9 SUMMARY

Described as “a writer in the tradition of Henry David Thoreau John Muir and other self educated seers” by the San Francisco Chronicle David Rains Wallace turns his attention in this new book to another distinctive corner of California its desert the driest and hottest environment in North America Drawing from h


3 thoughts on “Chuckwalla Land The Riddle of California's Desert

  1. says:

    In the Shadow of the SphinxFrom the wettest tropical rainforests to the driest deserts Earth's surface is a constantly changing mosaic of environments that have supported and challenged life on Earth since it's beginning some 3 billion years ago What is now a verdant woodland can become an endless prairie as conditions change and an arid wasteland as the the climate dries out even Only those organisms that can adapt to whatever conditions life throws at them will survive and prosper extinction is the only alternative In Chuckwalla Land nature writer and geographer David Rains Wallace has written another sciencehistory winner With his focus on the South Western USA Wallace traces the history of desert research and how scientist and people from all walks of life view these arid lands Are deserts earth old or recent creations? Did desert organisms evolve swiftly as the need arose or were they somehow pre adapted to these arid conditions? Wallace's research is extensive based on his own biological knowledge and his years of exploring the driest and hottest parts of our country Death Valley the Mojave and Sonoran deserts were places that he visited often and his insights on their origins may give you a fresh perspective on these unforgiving places This is not so much a biological or geological text book even though it has a lot of scientific information as it is a history of the people who lived studied and conducted research in the area Throughout the book Wallace talks about and uotes many of the explorers and scientist whose life work was desert study Depending on how much you know about this subject some of the names may be familiar to you The famous bone wars of Othiel C Marsh and Edward D Cope men like Daniel I Axelrod and Charles Darwin all played a part in the ever changing theories of the deserts While the book's narrative centers primarily on the American Deserts those theories can be applied to any of the world's arid landscapes What part do mountain building and other geological processes play in desert formation and movement? Should deserts be saved as is or cultivated into farm land and ORV playgrounds? At about 200 pages this book is a uick read but one that will give you plenty of food for thought about nature and the people who study it One thing I noticed in both the print and Kindle editions There are extensive Notes but no way to access them from the text I found that rather odd The publisher University of California Press could have done a lot better A few maps and scenic photos would have also been nice but that's a publishing decision not Kindle's All in all this is a wonderful book in spite of my nit picky comments I had no technical or downloading problems with this Kindle editionLast Ranger


  2. says:

    I purchased this book because I was about to visit Joshua Tree National Park and wanted to know about the desert ecosystems of the American southwest The author clearly knows his stuff and he writes well I was not expecting most of the book to be as technical as it was which was my fault because I didn't read the information about it as thoroughly as I should have It is entirely a discussion of attempts over the past century or so to age the desert ecosystem I really enjoyed the descriptions of flora and fauna and of the early explorers' findings I got lost in the see sawing of geologists botanists paleontologists and others in time I don't know my geologic periods well enough to keep up with what they were talking about But if you like one example about how scientists pursue truth and work off each other over time you're in luck


  3. says:

    Fascinating stuff but a bit repetitive and overly technical at times


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