review Old Soldiers Never Die ☆ E-book, or Kindle E-pub

Old Soldiers Never Die

free download Old Soldiers Never Die

Frank Richards was born in 1883 in Monmouthshire Orphaned at nine years old he was brought up by his aunt and uncle in the industrial Blaina area and went. Excellent readA basic account of life in the trenches by a normal everyday soldier who managed amazingly to survive the full four years at the frontline and his subseuent and rightfully his disgust at the non distinction between survivors of the trenches and those who never put themselves in danger and still picked up the same or even better war pensions than him

free read ç E-book, or Kindle E-pub ´ Frank Richards

Ut the Western Front he wrote his seminal account of the Great War from the standpoint of the common soldier Old Soldiers Never Die in 1933 He died in 1961. Story of a real soldier A fantastic and modest account of a man that was involved in nearly every major British action from 1914 1918 when men were men

Frank Richards ´ 9 summary

On to work as a coal miner throughout the 1890s before joining the Royal Welch Fusiliers in 1901 A veteran soldier who served in British India and througho. This was an amazing book The autobiography of a private soldier who went from Mons the first attack of the Germans in the first world war to the armistice over 4 years later Very very few survived He was amazingly lucky The generals do not come out of this well Fascinating I loved it The Enlightenment private soldier who went from Mons the first attack of the Germans in the first world war to the armistice over 4 years later Very very few survived He was amazingly lucky The generals do not come out of this well Fascinating I loved it


10 thoughts on “Old Soldiers Never Die

  1. says:

    This book is a remarkable account of life in the trenches from a soldier the author who served in France from the beginning of the war in August 1914 to the Armistice Never once was Richards wounded in all that time He served with the 2nd Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers which also numbered among its ranks Robert Graves and Siegfried Sassoon Unlike Graves and Sasson Richards did not become an officer Nor did he want to be one He was a Private throughout his years of service in France Richards saw action from the earliest clashes between British and German forces at Mons Belgium in August 1914 to First Ypres to Loos the Somme Arras Passchendaele and the decisive battles in the late summer and autumn of 1918For anyone with an interest in an engaging memoir about a man who managed to survive combat service throughout the First World War OLD SOLDIERS NEVER DIE is a must read


  2. says:

    “We received a message that no visual signalling would be carried out and that we would be employed as runners between Brigade and High Wood Down in the valley below us a company of Argyles were occupying some shell holes and shallow trenches they seemed to be just outside the barrage I had to pass by them when I was taking back a message to Brigade Headuarters about a hundred yards beyond I had just reached Brigade when it seemed that every German artillery gun had lengthened its range and was firing direct on the Argyles This lasted about fifteen minutes and then the shelling slackened I waited a while before making my way back and when I did pass by the Argyles’ position I could only see heads arms legs and mangled bodies I have often wondered since then if all the leading statesmen and generals of the warring countries had been threatened to be put under that barrage during the day of the 20th July 1916 and were told that if they survived it they would be forced to be under a similar one in a week’s time whether they would have all met together and signed a peace treaty before the week was up”


  3. says:

    Excellent readA basic account of life in the trenches by a normal everyday soldier who managed amazingly to survive the full four years at the frontline and his subseuent and rightfully his disgust at the non distinction between survivors of the trenches and those who never put themselves in danger and still picked up the same or even better war pensions than him


  4. says:

    This was an amazing book The autobiography of a private soldier who went from Mons the first attack of the Germans in the first world war to the armistice over 4 years later Very very few survived He was amazingly lucky The generals do not come out of this well Fascinating I loved it


  5. says:

    I would highly recommend this to anyone reading Robert Graves' Good Bye to All That as both men served in the Royal Welch Fusiliers and provide an interesting juxtaposition


  6. says:

    This is my second foray into the wild with Mr Richards the first being Old Soldier Sahib a freewheeling memoir about his time serving with the British army in occupied IndiaOld Soldiers Never Die is a graver book than the former for the obvious reason that life in the trenches was a lot less merry than that in the colonies That said it is heartening to see that the Old Soldier's resolve and sense of humor remaining still intact through some of the most grisly moments in the Great War to which he was both witness and participant Old Soldiers differs from most memoirs inasmuch as its narrator was already a lifer as we say in the Army meaning he had committed to a career with the Royal Forces before the outbreak of hostilities which he gets wind of naturally while drinking in a pub with fellow veterans Mr Richards was in the Signal Corps and his profession affected his writing style as Robert Graves pointed out somewhere The prose is rendered in clean precise language with no ostentation than what one would expect to find in a military dispatch and the emotion it arouses tends to occur organically and almost in reluctant counterpoint to Richards' unsparing and unsentimental description of daily life in the trenches He reports on the deaths of men draft animals pets close friends and his own many brushes with shrapnel and bayonets and gas without ever going windy as he might have had it He reports on men committing suicide or going mad and stripping naked in the same even tone he describes a change in weather Old Soldiers Never Die is an improvement on Old Soldier Sahib which wasn't bad and functions as a worthy compliment to that book or a good standalone testament to the feats and integrity of a man who is statistically speaking probably 1 in 25000 He should have been killed many times over and the fact that he wasn't makes this book both an essential historical record and an experience the reader owes it to the dead to read Too many in the rear echelon collected ribbons and medals while those in the trenches collected shrapnel and psychic scars with only a pension of a few shillings to show for their agony if they were lucky enough to live Frank Richards conveys the hard reality of life on the front line and what it was like to be an ageing enlisted man who was directed by well fed generals located safely to the rear But he also doles out credit to those brave officers in the brass who merited laurels I believe the Sassoon he makes reference to repeatedly in the book is none other than Siegfried Sassoon the famed English war poet Recommended in any event for those curious about the Great War or about an age that produced men of iron in contrast to our era of millenial meringue manlets


  7. says:

    Most of the memoirs of the First World War are written by officers and are often people who were not exposed to the complete totality of that dreadful war Frank Richards was different in that he was already a time served private soldier at the outbreak of the war and that he served throughout the whole four years Indeed we have to thank another war author Robert Graves for helping the largely uneducated Frank Richards to put this book together some 30 years after the events describedI am no fan of military service memoirs although Undertones of War by Edmund Blunden sits on my shelf demanding to be read because of my love of his poetryBut Richards book was appealing as it is the tale of the common man and also because he lived in Blaina not 8 miles from where I liveIt is an extraordinary book because of the rugged and non nonsense style of prose and because you come to realise that survival was very much a matter of chance Standing in trench the man next to him is killed by the weight of a falling bomb that fails to explode Time and time again events conspire to spare Richrads life when all around there is such terrible carnage That people would shoot themselves in the foot to get relief from the trenches demonstrates the level of desperationThere is some of that dark humour that is associated with such desperate times and there are tales of life set well behind the frontIt is well worth a read to gain a real insight into the lives of ordinary soldiers often civilians propelled into the carnage of war A tremendous read


  8. says:

    You can never read too many Great War memoirs Old Soldiers Never Die by Frank Richards does not disappoint A career enlisted soldier in the Royal Welch Fusiliers of the British Army he served in British India and Burma in the first years of the twentieth century When World War I broke out his unit was sent to the Western Front where he served the entire four years of the war He participated in nearly every major battle of the war Miraculously he avoided major injury and was one of the very few members of his unit who lived from the beginning to the end of the war Thanks to his bravery and leadership skills he was offered promotions several times but each time he turned them down He remained a private throughout the entire war Interestingly he served with and knew Robert Graves whose memoir Goodbye to All That is one of the most famous WWI memoirs Richards does not have nearly the same elegance of style but I prefer Richards's account He comes across as authentic less political and ultimately interesting than Graves Some of Richards's stories are beyond belief It is difficult for twenty first century mankind to comprehend the enormity of killing and suffering that those brave men endured Today every WWI veteran is dead and the very last WWII veterans are nearing 100 As that generation passes into history it is important than ever to read their memoirs and learn from our history so we don't repeat it


  9. says:

    Story of a real soldier A fantastic and modest account of a man that was involved in nearly every major British action from 1914 1918 when men were men


  10. says:

    EnthrallingThis is a wonderful account of life in the trenches An easy read that is not overburdened by military or technical jargon


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *