Venus in Winter Free read ë 0

Venus in Winter

review Venus in Winter

The author of The September ueen explores Tudor England with the tale of Bess of Hardwick the formidable four time widowed Tudor dynast who became one of the most powerful women in the history of England On her twelfth birthday Bess of Hardwick receives the news that she is to be a waiting gentlewoman in the household of Lady Zouche Armed with nothing but her razor sharp wit and fet. I tried I really did to get into this book But after 100 pages I've given up I rarely give up on books but I have two others to review and I just can't spend any time with this one All I got out of the 100 pages I read was a Tudor history lesson Bess Hardwicke goes to court and witnesses Henry VIII wed wives 4 and 5 I'm told the story picks up and I may try again later But writers of historical fiction should assume that readers kind of know their history and don't need to be hit over the head with it

review Ø PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ñ Gillian Bagwell

Ching looks Bess is terrified of leaving home But as her family has neither the money nor the connections to find her a good husband she must go to facilitate her rise in society When Bess arrives at the glamorous court of King Henry VIII she is thrust into a treacherous world of politics and intrigue a world she must uickly learn to navigate The gruesome fates of Henry’s wives co. Did Norman Rockwell write a book like this The female characters are so impossibly good The whole feeling of the book is so unrelentlessly sentimental Still I didn't know much about Bess of Hardwick so at least I have an introduction to her and will proceed to some nonfiction to satisfy my interest

Gillian Bagwell Ñ 0 Read

Nvince Bess that marrying is a dangerous business Even so she finds the courage to wed not once but four times Bess outlives one husband then another securing her status as a woman of property But it is when she is widowed a third time that she is left with a large fortune and even larger decisions discovering that for a woman of substance the power and the possibilities are endless. Bess of Hardwick married the Earl of Somerset and served as Mary ueen of Scots' jailer but that's the half of her life this novel does not cover Not bad but not great either 2 ueen of Scots' jailer but that's the half of her life this novel does not cover Not bad but not great either


10 thoughts on “Venus in Winter

  1. says:

    I had such high hopes for this one a retelling of the life of Bess of Hardwick This novel is full of descriptions some sex encounters with Tudor royalty a nasty relation but cuts off the final most interesting part of Bess's life when she was Countess of Shrewsbury and her life became entangled with Mary ueen of Scots That to me was a huge blunder on the author's part Also Bess and her husbands are such goodies that I was heartily bored by them and couldn't wait for this novel to end Ultimately this gets just two stars and a not recommended from me Too bad as this could have been a great deal For the longer review please go here


  2. says:

    I tried I really did to get into this book But after 100 pages I've given up I rarely give up on books but I have two others to review and I just can't spend any time with this one All I got out of the 100 pages I read was a Tudor history lesson Bess Hardwicke goes to court and witnesses Henry VIII wed wives 4 and 5 I'm told the story picks up and I may try again later But writers of historical fiction should assume that readers kind of know their history and don't need to be hit over the head with it


  3. says:

    The story of Bess Hardwick is surely an interesting one given the historical context I enjoyed the writing and the amount of details given however the flow of the story is too slow at points and the author complete skipped the next half of her life maybe the author will follow up with a seuel? I also find Bess Hardwick annoying since she is so one dimensional Her character is all good and all she does is pray and lets things and husbands fall into her lap


  4. says:

    Bess of Hardwick was neither a ueen nor a princess and did not have royal blood running through her veins Yet her person and life has stood the testament of time Bess was of one the most fiscally wealthiest woman of the Tudor period due to her four advantageous marriages; but was rich with a clever cunning intelligent classy but sometimes a bitch countenance Most texts spotlight Bess in her adult years most starting at age 40 but little focus is on her childhood and young adult growth Gillian Bagwell attempts to bring all of Bess to the surface in the historical fiction novel “Venus in Winter A Novel of Bess of Hardwick” Bagwell’s novels are purely historical entertainments and often times on par with fluffy bodice rippers Being fiction than history; Bagwell prefers to entice the reader with sex and gossipy scandal rather than letting history tell its own story Luckily “Venus in Winter” doesn’t fall victim as much to this stylistic pattern of Bagwell’s novels and is slightly less contrived Emphasize the term ‘slightly’ “Venus in Winter” follows Bess of Hardwick starting with her early childhood which allows Bagwell to re imagine Bess’s personality and demeanor as not much is recorded of this period Bagwell’s interpretation is uite different of the Bess characterization that Tudor readers are familiar with and disappointedly has no standout personality traits Of course as a child Bess would be just that a child Despite this reality the character box simply doesn’t fit Related to this Bess never comes ‘alive; in “Venus in Winter” Bess’s feelings thoughts and inner psyche are never truly revealed and the narrative focuses heavily on what is going on around her and at the Tudor Court Even though “Venus in Winter” claims to be a novel about Bes; this is not the actual case Readers never bond with Bess which makes sense as Bess has no character arc or development herself As with Bagwell’s other novels “Venus in Winter” is gossip heavy and drags with characters constantly discussing events and key figures rather than ever playing a role in them “Venus in Winter” is bluntly boring Even if this recall method is preferred; there are ways to be compelling but Bagwell lacks this ability Bess also always happens to be in the right place at the right time to overhear gossip which is not realistic at all Bagwell takes many historical liberties in “Venus in Winter” by retelling historical Tudor events in different contexts ie having Bess somehow be involved in true events even though she wasn’t in actuality This is off putting for readers whom prefer historical accuracy and incorrectly educates readers new to the subject “Venus in Winter” suffers from the same historical setting issues as Bagwell’s other novels with the plot language and illustrative descriptions feel akin to a Victorian novel than a Tudor piece “Venus in Winter” is a ‘light’ piece with little merit On a positive note as mentioned earlier; “Venus in Winter” is not overly saturated in sex and bedroom antics and doesn’t drown the reader in such pathetic attempts to lure This results in “Venus in Winter” possessing a small ounce of depth “Venus in Winter” should be taken with a grain of salt in respect to Bagwell’s characters always having the inside information regarding all of the events taking place information that contemporaries and modern day researchers only know from the mountains of sources and hindsight There is no way these insights would have been apparent to those living the events; adding to the absence of true fact in “Venus in Winter” Bagwell also has the habit of mixing the “Venus in Winter” storyline with immaturity constant elementary descriptions like Henry VIII’s “piggy fingers” and Bess constantly “weeping” None of this is necessary nor does it drive the story “Venus in Winter” is on the young adult fiction side of the spectrum Even though Bagwell successfully refrained from the usual amount of over sexed fluff in “Venus in Winter”; the concluding chapters do contain some measure of sex scenes and even that of magick and occult themes Bagwell couldn’t help herself and had to ‘get it in there’ The conclusion of “Venus in Winter” is slightly abrupt and certainly not memorable both in plot and with Bess’s characterization leaving much to be desired Bagwell supplements this with a brief ‘Author’s Note’ acknowledging some overall historical liberties but the lack of detail hardly touches the scope of the fictional strands that many readers will think as fact “Venus in Winter” is a much stronger novel in comparison to Bagwell’s “The September ueen” and “The Darling Strumpet” However it is still poor with an absence of living characters and events too much gossip and fiction than history The major flaw is with Bess herself “Venus in Winter” aims to spotlight Bess and yet readers see none of the personality traits Bess is still famous for hundreds of years later and neither do readers bond with her at all”Venus in Winter” is an ‘okay’ introduction and re imagining of Bess’s life before she houses Mary ueen of Scots the novel ends before this period; but it is not a must read For those who do simply remember this is a historical entertainment and is not heavy on facts


  5. says:

    I have no idea how a historical fiction author could take on Bess of Hardwick's early life and write a bland novel but Bagwell managed it


  6. says:

    Did Norman Rockwell write a book like this? The female characters are so impossibly good The whole feeling of the book is so unrelentlessly sentimental Still I didn't know much about Bess of Hardwick so at least I have an introduction to her and will proceed to some nonfiction to satisfy my interest


  7. says:

    Fantastic book I love Bagwell's previous two books but I think this may be my favorite Review to come


  8. says:

    Bess of Hardwick married the Earl of Somerset and served as Mary ueen of Scots' jailer but that's the half of her life this novel does not cover Not bad but not great either


  9. says:

    25 StarsA book purported to be about Bess of Hardwick I looked forward to exploring the life of such an important figure in female history during the Elizabethan age From what I've gleaned from Wikipedia and other research sources I knew her to come from rough beginning to rise as one of the wealthiest women of her era ancestress of throne claimants However what I got from this book was the history of the Tudors through the eyes of an onlooker NOT what I wanted from this titleI will say the author does a great job with historical details and scene setting I got a clear mental picture of the glamour inherent to Tudor courts The sumptuous fabrics of court costumes and the splendor of palaces and castles were easily visualized This part of the book was experienced rather than just readThe bits actually about Bess were intriguing The author started out well giving us a family situation hovering on the brink of poverty and debtors prison Bess is lucky enough to find connections that launch her into court life where she finds opportunities to better herself and help her family Throughout the book Bess shows some intelligence and ability in being able to balance the dangers of intrigue and power shifts as Henry the Eighth's family and courtiers vie for the throne She protects and provides for her family husband and children as best she can in an ever shifting worldHowever I felt the author spent so little time on Beth herself that this book shouldn't be touted as a work on her More time was spent talking about the history of the Tudor family the various events in the different reigns of that dynasty Little was shown on how those events impacted Beth and her family; it seemed like I was presented with a timeline of the various Tudor reigns rather than a book on Bess of HardwickDespite having shown some intelligence Beth’s characterization overall is of a doormat She's too perfect She's the perfect wife perfect mother perfect friend and perfect subject She's ever loyal and ever true At least seeing her beginning with some aspects of her intelligence showcased saved her character in this bookAnd then the author makes the added insult in neglecting to include the most dramatic and interesting part of Bess' life that of her last marriage and her involvement with the jailing of Mary ueen of Scots Of all her marriages this one probably was the rockiest and most problematic I think the including of this part of the story of her life would have helped elevate my doormat image of her I think the author missed a golden opportunity by excluding this part of her life It would have lifted the book from mediocrity into a truly enjoyable historical fiction on a woman that stood out in historyFrom the author notes the author makes it clear that she wanted to concentrate on Beth early life So the exclusion of that last part of her life I suppose I can understand However this book still stands out only for how bland it is Concentrating on individuals that have had volumes and volumes written about them I think the author missed the boat when it came to the opportunity on portraying a historical woman that could stand to have exploration done on her herself What little I got only made me thirst for but what I got to round out those wonderful glimpses was a doormat of a woman who is too perfect to be real If you're looking for a light read and not expecting much maybe give this book a look However I wouldn't go out of my way to look for a copy


  10. says:

    This is my third book by Ms Bagwell and I can tell you that I was jumping up and down when given the opportunity to review it I can tell you that I will be jumping up and down if given the opportunity to review her next book She is one of those authors where I see her name on the book and I would read it without even checking out the synopsis I just KNOW that I am in for a well researched well written engrossing novelVenus is Winter was no exception; I took it on my vacation and like her two other books I read it in one sitting I find that once I start I am part of the world of the protagonist and it is very hard to leave In this case that protagonist is Bess of Hardwick a woman who rose from practically nothing to become one of the most wealthy women in England Much is left to history of Bess from her life after she married her last husband George Talbot the Earl of Shrewsbury but not much of the years preceding Venus in Winter takes on the task of bringing Bess's early years to lifeSince little has been left to history about her life Ms Bagwell has created a world of what might have been given Bess's known locations and intelligent supposition She uses the history of the time to predict how Bess might have felt or reacted to the swirling politics of the times Bess was fortunate in her marriages and each one advanced her standing and fortune She also seems to have been a very intelligent and shrewd womanThe brilliance in this book comes from the writing that pulls you into the mood of the times and uncertainty that came with the succession of monarchs from Henry VIII to Edward VI to Mary I to Elizabeth I How does a person stay safe how does a person keep their fortune how does a person proof their loyalty? Ms Bagwell makes her readers feel all of the upset that the people of the time must have feltBess herself was a little of a struggle for me Perhaps because so little is actually known of her from this period in history and it was a matter of placing her into events instead of having her drive events I don't know Unlike some of the historical characters from the other books by Ms Bagwell Bess was still a bit of an unknown character I enjoyed the history I loved the reading but I can't say I left the book loving Bess


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