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Siddhartha Eine indische Dichtung

free download Siddhartha Eine indische Dichtung

Herman Hesse's classic novel has delighted inspired and influenced generations of readers writers and thinkers In this story of a w MY BEST BOOK OF 2017 In life we all look for meaning we all look for something to give us a purpose and in essence a reason to actually be alive Nobody wants to get to the end of their journey and realise it was all for nothing and that their days were utterly wasted So how do we find this meaning “One must find the source within one's own Self one must possess it Everything else was seeking a detour an error” We must find our own peace Siddhartha followed the teachings of others and it granted him very little happiness He meets Buddha or a Buddha and he realises that the only way he can achieve the same degree of serenity is to find it himself The words of the man as wise as they may be are just air; they are not experience they are not one’s own wisdom granted through trial So he takes his own path albeit an indirect one and finally awakens his mind into a sense of enlightenment But in order to do so he must first realise the true state of emptiness And of course to understand emptiness one must first experience temporary fullness; thus he walks into the world of the everyday man He indulges in their pleasure gains possessions and takes a lover He forms attachments and begets a household of servants and wealth Through experiencimg such things he learns that they are shallow and transitory; they will never create the feeling of lasting happiness within his soul so he walks out once with the full realisation that peace can only come from one place himself “I have had to experience so much stupidity so many vices so much error so much nausea disillusionment and sorrow just in order to become a child again and begin anew I had to experience despair I had to sink to the greatest mental depths to thoughts of suicide in order to experience grace”He experiences oneness with his own thoughts with everyone else and anything that resides in nature he becomes enlightened though only through returning from the darkest of times Suffering exists suffering will always exist and it is how we deal with this suffering that defines us it is how we pick ourselves up afterwards not letting it ruin our lives and those around us that makes us stronger In this Hesse capture something extremely difficult to put into words which is something the novel freuently recognises How does one accurately define these vague concepts of belief He doesn’t So we rely on allegories to teach us these ideals to make us understand that happiness is not euitable with materialism and to make us realise that seeking something too ardently may mean we miss it altogether Seeking the meaning of life is not the answer living life the life of peace and compassion is Siddhartha follows the vibrations of his soul the sound of the river and it takes him exactly where he needs to go As a student of Buddhism as a struggling practitioner I found this book extremely helpful It cuts through all the rhetoric the arguments and debates and gets to the very heart of the matter itself This is a book I will carry with me through life; this is a book that has so much wisdom to impart and now the third book to truly impact me individuallyFacebook| Twitter| Insta| Academia

summary æ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ✓ Hermann Hesse

Ern religions Jungian archetypes Western individualism into a uniue vision of life as expressed through one man's search for meanin By the latter part of the 19th Century the colonial spread of European powers across the world was in full swing The British ruled India and Australia and had gone to war with China to force opium on the population Africa South America and the Philippines had been portioned out for Western rule and control of resourcesBut tyranny does not travel only in one direction from conueror to subject When Medieval European knights returned from the crusades they brought with them mathematical principles Greek and Roman texts and thus was the European Renaissance kindled by the Light of Islam Africans were brought to America as slaves but even being scattered and mistreated did not prevent them from changing the culture gifting us with blues jazz and African descended words like 'funk' 'mojo' 'boogie' and 'cool'It was the same with the colonial powers of the fin de siècle who brought back stories myths fashions art and philosophies from all over the world Many Europeans grew obsessed with these foreign religions finding in them both universal truths of human existence and completely new modes of thought Organizations like the Theosophical Society were formed to explore these religions it was all the rageBut there was a problem they got almost all of it wrongA Frenchman could spend his entire life learning the intricacies of Greek and Hebrew in order to study Catholicism its origins philosophies schisms heresies and history and still find that in the end there is much he does not know and that he'd made many errors along the way This despite the fact that his culture is already steeped in it he can go and speak to one of hundreds of experts any time he has a uestion and has access to a complete library of texts on the subject written in his own language and by people of a similar cultureNow imagine our 19th Century Gascon trying to do the same thing with Buddhism where not only the original texts on the subject but the histories and analyses are in not merely a foreign language but a completely different language branch where the experts are from a different culture and speak a different language and where the complexity and depth of history are just as vastIt's no wonder that the Theosophists and similar groups ended up with garbled mistranslated simplified versions that combined opposing schools of thought haphazardly As an old philosophy professor of mine once said You can learn a great deal about German Protestantism from reading Siddhartha but almost nothing about BuddhismWhat ultimately emerged from the Theosophist movement was not a branch of Western Buddhism but the 'New Age Movement' a grab bag of the same old Western ideas dressed up as mystical Oriental wisdom Indeed the central idea of the inane self help book 'The Secret' and of Siddhartha are the same the 'Law of Attraction' which is not a Buddhist principleLike most of Hesse's work it belongs in the 'Spiritual Self Help' section where vague handwaving and knowing looks are held in higher esteem than thought or insight It's the same nonspecific mysticism he shows us in The Journey To The East and The Glass Bead Game where the benefits of wisdom are indistinguishable from the symptoms of profound dementiaIf you want to understand Buddhism start somewhere else because you'd just have to unlearn all of Hesse's incorrect arguments and definitions Happily we have come a long way since Hesse's time with experts and commentaries in many different languages available to the avid student But if you'd like to see someone try to explain the principles of Lutheranism using only misused Hindu terms this may be the book for you

Hermann Hesse ✓ 6 free read

Ealthy Indian Brahmin who casts off a life of privilege to seek spiritual fulfillment Hesse synthesizes disparate philosophies East It was the book I read it four years back And to tell the truth I did not liked it much at the time I thought this guy has written a book for western audience who are not familiar with the 'philosophy of karma and dharma' or rather in general the basic philosophy of India who after reading it will realize something esoteric And so it seemed to me a book containing wisdom that didn't touched me And I finished it with the verdict contains wisdom but lacks depth boring at times and do not grabs your heart and is not extra ordinary in any way But over the years I've come to understand that it is this ordinary ness that which makes this work exceptional It is the story of common man just like you and me who goes through the struggles of life He is a man who have the ualities that we all common man possess such as ambition greed possessiveness lust lying and etc And it was one day when I was pondering over the book I came to know that it was Hermann Hesse's own life that inspired him to write Siddhartha And it became clear to me why he has written the way it is written Then it dawned on me that it was all realistic happenings that the book pointed and not something esoteric Even the character Siddhartha as I came to realize was as fragile and incomplete imperfect as me or any common man Now I understand after many years that Hesse has written from the point of view of a common man not a protege like Buddha or Adi Shankaracharya And it is in this light of 'the struggle of a lay man' that this book comes in all its glory I mean in terms of wisdom and not in terms of reading pleasure And as the time is passing by I'm getting deeper and deeper into this book and understanding it betterHighly Recommended The Test: Taken By The Men Who Raised Me understand that it is this ordinary ness that which makes this work exceptional It is the story of common man just like you and me who goes through the struggles of life He is a man who have the Teacher Evaluation in Music: A Guide for Music Teachers in the Us ualities that we all common man possess such as ambition greed possessiveness lust lying and etc And it was one day when I was pondering over the book I came to know that it was Hermann Hesse's own life that inspired him to write Siddhartha And it became clear to me why he has written the way it is written Then it dawned on me that it was all realistic happenings that the book pointed and not something esoteric Even the character Siddhartha as I came to realize was as fragile and incomplete imperfect as me or any common man Now I Reticence understand after many years that Hesse has written from the point of view of a common man not a protege like Buddha or Adi Shankaracharya And it is in this light of 'the struggle of a lay man' that this book comes in all its glory I mean in terms of wisdom and not in terms of reading pleasure And as the time is passing by I'm getting deeper and deeper into this book and Peloponnesian War understanding it betterHighly Recommended

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