DOWNLOAD ↠ The Portrait


The Portrait

READ & DOWNLOAD The Portrait

Critico su influencia e impasividad a la hora de encumbrar o destruir carreras Una historia de traicion hipocresia amor prohibido venganza suicidio y asesinat I approached this with caution as Pears' An Instance of the Fingerpost was a daunting read for me However I was pleasantly surprised with this simple straightforward story in a secluded location a gentleman is visited by an old friend and the two of them reminisce and resolve a previous conflict No wait that was Sandor Maria's stunning masterpiece Embers which was first published in Hungary in 1942 and was rediscovered and translated for English readers in 2001 But The Portrait takes place on an island while Embers takes place in the mountains Yes that's it island vs mountain Chaucer likely utilized Boccaccio's 14th century The Decameron Shakespeare certainly was inspired by stories of others The plot of Lolita closely followed Patricia Highsmith's The Price of Saltwho was it that said there is nothing new under the sun Anyway I'll wrap it up by saying I enjoyed The Portrait on its own merit a suspense story without a word wasted And I think I'll have another by Pears And if you too liked this you must read Embers

CHARACTERS à THARROWEBDESIGN.CO.UK ↠ Iain Pears

A comienzos del siglo XX un influyente critico de arte viaja desde Londres hasta la costa noreste de Francia a fin de posar para un retrato ue la hara un viejo My advice to prospective readers don't stop reading this book until the end You may begin reading it say huh and want to put it down But don't The whole thing unravels the further you go and it is worth the waitThe entire book is structured as a monologue on the part of the narrator Henry MacAlpine MacAlpine is a very much sought after artist in early 1900s London; his work is mostly portraiture well at least the work that provides his living His subject visiting MacAlpine in his current home on a small island off the Brittany coast of France is one William Naysmith a highly influential art critic who used to be one of MacAlpine's best friends MacAlpine is now in a state of self exile on this small island but the reader does not find out why until the end He has summoned Naysmith to his island to paint his portrait and it is during the course of the sitting that the monologue occurs As the sitting and the monologue go on the readers learns about the history of these two individuals from MacAlpine's beginning as an artist through his self imposed exileTrust me on this one The book is extremely well written and don't read it with getting to the end in mind Enjoy the ride therethat's the crux of this book and it makes for a very uniue reading experience Recommended When Movements Become Parties del siglo XX un influyente critico Gekka Mugentan, Vol. 6 de arte viaja Illegal Affairs desde Londres hasta la costa noreste 21 Short Plays de Francia a fin Angel of Sudden Hill de posar para un retrato ue la hara un viejo My advice to prospective readers The Complete Anchoring Handbook don't stop reading this book until the end You may begin reading it say huh and want to put it Screams and Nightmares down But Muay Thai Unleashed don't The whole thing unravels the further you go and it is worth the waitThe entire book is structured as a monologue on the part of the narrator Henry MacAlpine MacAlpine is a very much sought after artist in early 1900s London; his work is mostly portraiture well at least the work that provides his living His subject visiting MacAlpine in his current home on a small island off the Brittany coast of France is one William Naysmith a highly influential art critic who used to be one of MacAlpine's best friends MacAlpine is now in a state of self exile on this small island but the reader Practical Boat Mechanics does not find out why until the end He has summoned Naysmith to his island to paint his portrait and it is Short Cycle Selling during the course of the sitting that the monologue occurs As the sitting and the monologue go on the readers learns about the history of these two individuals from MacAlpine's beginning as an artist through his self imposed exileTrust me on this one The book is extremely well written and Break the Bipolar Cycle don't read it with getting to the end in mind Enjoy the ride therethat's the crux of this book and it makes for a very uniue reading experience Recommended

Iain Pears ↠ 1 DOWNLOAD

Amigo un atormentado artista autoexiliado en una isla remota Mientras le observa el pintor recuerda sus anos de amistad el regalo envenenado del mecenazgo del This is a short novel written mainly as a monologue Set on a small island off the coast of Brittany in the early 1900’s this features artist Henry MacAlpine who is visited by critic William Nasmyth The two men have not met for four years but now MacAlpine is going to paint his portraitWhile MacAlpine paints he talks and it is this monologue which makes up the novel We learn why McAlpine – a promising artist – fled London for this isolated island We learn of the background between him and Nasmyth and why MacAlpine invited him after so longAlthough this is a dark tale it is limited by the fact that the reader is aware there must be a pretty uncomfortable reason for MacAlpine having left London when he was on the cusp of such success Somehow for me this lacked any real drama There was melodrama but I failed to really feel empathy for any of the characters mentioned and found the storyline dull Not one I would recommend


10 thoughts on “The Portrait

  1. says:

    My advice to prospective readers don't stop reading this book until the end You may begin reading it say huh? and want to put it down But don't The whole thing unravels the further you go and it is worth the waitThe entire book is structured as a monologue on the part of the narrator Henry MacAlpine MacAlpine is a very much sought after artist in early 1900s London; his work is mostly portraiture well at least the work that provides his living His subject visiting MacAlpine in his current home on a small island off the Brittany coast of France is one William Naysmith a highly influential art critic who used to be one of MacAlpine's best friends MacAlpine is now in a state of self exile on this small island but the reader does not find out why until the end He has summoned Naysmith to his island to paint his portrait and it is during the course of the sitting that the monologue occurs As the sitting and the monologue go on the readers learns about the history of these two individuals from MacAlpine's beginning as an artist through his self imposed exileTrust me on this one The book is extremely well written and don't read it with getting to the end in mind Enjoy the ride therethat's the crux of this book and it makes for a very uniue reading experience Recommended


  2. says:

    This isn't a collaboration I paint; you sit When you are in that chair you are stripped of your expertise of your taste and discernment Your opinion is of no value to me than that of the old peasant I sketched last month You are defenceless until I have finished Hmm this feels like an exercise in narrative control than anything else and there's certainly none of the suspense promoted in the blurb this is so weighed down with foreshadowing and earlier precedents My Last Duchess by Browning some tales by Poe that it's clear almost from the start what must inevitably happen Given that certainty the story becomes too drawn out and might have been better as a long short story rather than a novella 173 pages in my edition could have been wrapped up in half the length The 'thing' is that it's completely a monologue addressed by the artist over a number of sittings to the critic who was once his mentor and best friend back in turn of the century London bohemian circles This stylised mode of telling where the critic never says a word never speaks back to the accusations made against him thus raises interesting uestions view spoileris he really there or is the whole encounter a fantasy of the painter who is thus hovering on the edge of madness? Just as he's hovering on the edge of that cliff at the end? hide spoiler


  3. says:

    The painter without the critic is nothing The good critic can make the mediocre famous the great obscure His power is limitless; the artist is his servant and one day will recognize the fact 107An important British art critic has traveled to the isolated Breton island of Houat to have his portrait painted by an acuaintance that he once mentored In an interior monologue the artist looks back at the times they shared in London and Paris in the early 20th Century The art critic has destroyed lives while remaining unscathed himself The artist wants to show the true character of the man on the canvas The novel is a psychological study of the two men and how far one will go in revenge Chilling


  4. says:

    This is a short novel written mainly as a monologue Set on a small island off the coast of Brittany in the early 1900’s this features artist Henry MacAlpine who is visited by critic William Nasmyth The two men have not met for four years but now MacAlpine is going to paint his portraitWhile MacAlpine paints he talks and it is this monologue which makes up the novel We learn why McAlpine – a promising artist – fled London for this isolated island We learn of the background between him and Nasmyth and why MacAlpine invited him after so longAlthough this is a dark tale it is limited by the fact that the reader is aware there must be a pretty uncomfortable reason for MacAlpine having left London when he was on the cusp of such success Somehow for me this lacked any real drama There was melodrama but I failed to really feel empathy for any of the characters mentioned and found the storyline dull Not one I would recommend


  5. says:

    This is written as a first person dialogue directed at one person This might be off putting to some At first I wasn't comfortable reading it I wanted some straight narrative or to read a response from the other person I'm not positive I actually suirmed but I'm sure I felt like it Still I never had any intention of setting it aside I have read other novels where the beginning and even mid section were slow In those as in this I came to recognize the very good foundation laid in those early pagesThe two men are Henry Morris MacAlpine a painter and William Nasmyth an art critic Henry is on a small French island off the Breton coast having left the London art scene several years earlier when he was friends with William William has joined him there to have his portrait painted The time of their meeting is 1913 but the story really takes place in the years leading up to this meetingIain Pears is an art historian Jonathan Argyll of the series is an art dealer turned detective It appears his standalone novels like this one are good historical mysteries all involving art in some way or another But they are not mysteries in the traditional sense In this I could only listen to Henry tell his story and wonder why did he leave London?; why did William come to such a remote place to have his portrait painted? The story builds while I wondered The writing is above average The characterizations are uite good and don't expect just the two male charactersThis is short at just over 200 pages I think I would not have been able to tolerate being uncomfortable listening to Henry ramble on for than that It was exactly what Pears needed to get his story told and told brilliantly I'm rambling myself here trying to decide whether this is worth 5 stars I so want it to be but I'm afraid it just doesn't uite make the leap over that line


  6. says:

    Shame on me I bought this book long looooong ago but tucked it away on one of my faraway shelves without ever reading it due to the fact that I once tried another book by this author but ultimately had to give up because I found it completely unreadable and thus incomprehensible at the time Conseuently it had me convinced that either his writing style wasn't my cup of tea or that my pea brain just wasn't able to translate his clever writing into plain English but whatever the reason I never was in a hurry to try againHowever recently I made a deal with myself to finally work my way through all those books on forgotten shelves that I never read and so Iain Pears and I met once again And it pleases me to no end to say that time around I enjoyed his company so SO much I won't go into what the story is about because I truly think that the less you know about the plot going in the better your enjoyment of it will be Just let the story come to you as it unfolds leisurely completely in its own time And don't uit before the end because the ending is what tilts this story from good to great 475 stars


  7. says:

    I freuently encounter two types of spoiler The first being those clearly identified in advance and the second which thrusts the whole deal up your nose without warningI hate the first because I am unable to read the review in advance I hate the second however and this book suffered a great deal because of this one I stupidly read the review in The Guardian just after I had embarked on it I had immediately guessed half out the final outcome but this really ruined itI wanted to abandon it after the first chapter but persevered even though I knew the end and had guessed the other two or three sub tales But I continued I have no real idea why This is a monologue and a monologue which would be impossible; no one would sit without attempting to respond to the revelationsaccusationsMaybe it would work as a short story but much of this bored me particularly as I had already unpicked itEDIT Oh by the way I do appreciate the irony here o


  8. says:

    I approached this with caution as Pears' An Instance of the Fingerpost was a daunting read for me However I was pleasantly surprised with this simple straightforward story in a secluded location a gentleman is visited by an old friend and the two of them reminisce and resolve a previous conflict No wait that was Sandor Maria's stunning masterpiece Embers which was first published in Hungary in 1942 and was rediscovered and translated for English readers in 2001 But The Portrait takes place on an island while Embers takes place in the mountains Yes that's it island vs mountain Chaucer likely utilized Boccaccio's 14th century The Decameron Shakespeare certainly was inspired by stories of others The plot of Lolita closely followed Patricia Highsmith's The Price of Saltwho was it that said there is nothing new under the sun? Anyway I'll wrap it up by saying I enjoyed The Portrait on its own merit a suspense story without a word wasted And I think I'll have another by Pears And if you too liked this you must read Embers


  9. says:

    Imagine The Cask of Amontillado but told in the narrative voice of a painter through a number of sittings with an art critic We know this will not end well for the critic but in what manner will the demise come and what is the cause of revenge? Brilliant idea But Pears the author of not one but two previous masterpieces is in this instance sadly no Poe


  10. says:

    This is a beautiful little masterpiece of a book It might well have been titled The Menacing Foreshadowy Book of Foreshadowing because right from the beginning in fact right from reading the cover flaps you know that something bad is going to happen and the badness is deliciously telegraphed in a thousand ways over the course of the book It is a monologue the words of an artist as he paints a portrait of his subject an art critic whom he has known for years As he creates his portrait in oil his words create a verbal portrait of the man as well as portraits of several other characters from their shared history and a self portrait of the artist himself By the end of the book the artist's motivations and intentions become clear What kept this book from being truly great I think is that by the end of the book the artist has convinced us of the justice of his crime Instead of revealing a monstrous horrible fate for an innocent man Pears essentially shows us a fate which is or less deserved if perhaps not richly His protagonist is self effacing not grandiose Like the others of Pears' serious books this one is incredibly well written It is a joy to read just for the prose even if the struggles within the art world and artists do come across as a bit fey and silly


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *