DOWNLOAD ´ Deep Souths Delta Piedmont and Sea Island Society in the Age of Segregation

Deep Souths Delta Piedmont and Sea Island Society in the Age of Segregation

REVIEW Deep Souths Delta Piedmont and Sea Island Society in the Age of Segregation

Deep Souths tells the stories of three southern regions from Reconstruction to World War II the Mississippi Yazoo Delta the eastern Piedmont of Georgia and the Georgia Sea Islands and Atlantic coast Though these regions initially shared the histories and populations we associate with the idea of a Deep South all ha.

CHARACTERS Ò THARROWEBDESIGN.CO.UK ↠ J. William Harris

D economies based on slave plantation labor in 1860 their histories diverged sharply during the three generations after Reconstruction With research gathered from oral histories census reports and a wide variety of other sources Harris traces these regional changes in cumulative stories of individuals across the so. Those Good Gertrudes labor in 1860 their histories diverged sharply during the three generations after Reconstruction With research gathered from oral histories census reports and a wide variety of other sources Harris traces these regional changes in cumulative stories of individuals across the so.

J. William Harris ↠ 1 DOWNLOAD

Cial spectrum Deep Souths presents a comparative and ground level view of history that challenges the idea that the lower South was either uniform or static in the era of segregation By the end of the New Deal era changes in these regions had prepared the way for the civil rights movement and the end of segregation. Seeing the Light level view of history that challenges the idea that the Deep Souths lower South was either uniform or static in the era of segregation By the end of the New Deal era changes in these regions had prepared the way for the civil rights movement and the end of segregation.


1 thoughts on “Deep Souths Delta Piedmont and Sea Island Society in the Age of Segregation

  1. says:

    Harris' book although somewhat dry and heavy on charts tables and statistics provides an interesting and detailed look at the historical trajectory of three microregions that each can be considered part of the Deep South in that their economies were heavily reliant on enslaved agricultural labor before the Civil War the Sea Islands of Georgia Georgia's Eastern Piedmont the hinterlands of Augusta Georgia and the Mississippi Delta Although each of these regions shared certain similarities in terms of being heavily rural with high percentages of African Americans as well as the way in which the racially codified Jim Crow Laws governed behavior in the region each also followed a distinct path in terms of their economy politics and socialrace relations from the time of Reconstruction until the Second World War While the Sea Islands and Eastern Georgia Piedmont had long been settled since the late 18th century the Mississippi Delta was only heavily developed after the Civil War Black land ownership was much higher in the Sea Islands which preserved the distinctive GullahGeechee culture in isolation from White Society while very few Blacks owned land in the Mississippi Delta Although Democrats were dominant overall in each region a strong Populist movement emerged in Georgia's Eastern Piedmont while residual Black voting power and opposition to Democratic control of Georgia's legislature created pockets of Republican Strength in the Georgia Sea Islands Harris focuses specifically on several trends in the early 20th Century which reframed the nature of Black citizenship and Civil Rights in relationship to the American Nation as a whole particularly the First World War the Great Depression and the growth of the tourism industry in the Sea Islands of Georgia These upheavals respectively influenced race relations in the region through military mobilization of both Whites and African Americans the implementation of Federal Programs designed to bring relief to members of both races and the investment of Northeastern capital in the region which brought jobs that diminished the reliance of the Sea Islands' remaining independent Black farmers on agriculture Another significant aspect of life in these regions which Harris examines is that of Class with members of the White Middle and Upper Classes and the small but influential Black Middle Class often being culturally similar to each other than the very large number of poor sharecroppers and tenant farmers of both races Overall this is an informative read for anyone interested particularly in learning aspects of the economic political and social history of specific regions of the Deep South between 1865 and 1940 however often the larger picture here is lost amid a overabundance of details