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8 thoughts on “The Art of French Pastry: A Cookbook

  1. says:

    Beginning January 2016, I decided to spend a year trying to master making croissants and pain au chocolat. I'd never made either, but in an article I read in SIFT magazine about baking bread and croissants, one baker argued most people don't bake their breads or croissants long enough, so they come out pasty looking. He said he's always arguing with his customers who complain that the's selling them burnt bread or burnt croissants. It was a good article with a photo of a croissant so dark and brown and delicious looking, it intrigued me. So I thought I'd try it, ya know, just to see if I could do it. I nailed it on my first try that's how fantastic this recipe is and his explanations. I recommend this book very highly. Me, just a normal baker who bakes something, like eight times a year, was able to nail this. Now I make them semi weekly and all of my friends love being on my distribution list!


  2. says:

    This book is a TREASURE. I say so because the recipes are perfect. First, the measurements are correct and in the correct format. I've had many books in the past where the quantities are clearly WAY off. And you don't know that they are way off until you're project turns to trash. And yes, although the measurements are in weight, which will scare the daylights out of some people, this is the correct way to measure pastry ingredients. Second, the details of how to bring the ingredients together (the technique) is clearly spelled out..almost painfully spelled out. You won't have to worry that you didn't get enough explanation. But that's good. And finally, third, the recipes are all outstanding. They are practical. They are high quality but do able at home. Don't misunderstand, they are in depth French pastry recipes. And they may require some special ordering of ingredients. So if you are looking for a good chocolate chip cookies and brownies, this is not the book you want. But if you want a book that gives you good, reliable French recipes for all seasons, this is the best I've seen. What would make it better? Volume 2.


  3. says:

    This is an absolutely fantastic book on the fine art of French pastry! Chef Pfeiffer gives the reader all the tips and tricks necessary to turn out very fine pastries. As well, he weaves in little stories of his own life as a pastry chef that elevate this book above the basic pastry texts. The stories are the hidden gems in the book! Do not be dismayed that this book seems a little technical. The science presented is in fact very basic and easy to understand, but it is completely necessary in order to achieve consistency and to avoid mistakes. As an example, all recipes have ingredients scaled by weight. Finally, a pastry text that drives home the need for proper scaling! No cups, teaspoons, etc. Far too many baking books still use flour measured in volume with no explanation of the exact technique, the result being unreproducible results or a failed recipe. Not so this text!

    I consider myself a pastry hobbyist. I am not an expert and I do not bake every day. However, when I do bake I want consistent results. To that end I have taken a fair number of pastry classes. This book is the next best thing to taking a class from a master. And the best thing about this master is that he knows his audience, because he's taught pastry novices for years. He already knows your potential mistakes and points them out before you make them! So do yourself a favor. If you enjoy French pastries and you want to improve your technique, then buy this book! It is the only book on French pastry that you will ever need.


  4. says:

    OK, I admit, I've only tried one recipe, the brioche. I make brioche a lot, but this particular method was new to me. I was going to chuck it and try something else, but then I thought, what the heck are you buying a pastry how to book for, if you're not going to do what it says. So I decided I was going to follow every step to the letter.

    Everything went okay until it was time to add butter. Supposedly, after about 8 10 minutes (my interpretation of 2 minutes + 2 minutes + a repeat of the process + a minute or two for error), the butter should be completely incorporated. I had a butter coated ball of dough. It's possible that the author's idea of adding a "tiny bit of flour" in an earlier step is a lot bigger than mine. I wound up adding roughly half again as much flour as was originally called for. That gave me an acceptable dough.

    Now for the first rise. The author lists a trick for use if the kitchen isn't warm enough. He says to fill a small saucepan with about an inch of boiling water, put that in a cold oven, and that will produce enough heat and humidity for the dough to rise.

    Afraid not. After 90 minutes, my dough hadn't budged, so I did what I usually do set the oven to its lowest setting, pop the bowl of dough in, set the timer for 2 minutes; at the end of two minutes, shut the oven off. The lowest setting on my oven is 170F; after two minutes, the oven temperature hasn't even registered, but it's warmer than the kitchen. I leave that to rise. Now, after 90 minutes, it's ready to punch down and put in the fridge.

    After 2 hours in the fridge, it's risen barely perceptibly, but I punch it down anyway and leave it overnight.

    Shaping the dough worked nicely. Then he says to let it rise uncovered in a warm humid area. I wasn't going to do the boiling water thing again, so I did my usual oven rise, only uncovered as directed. 90 minutes later, no rise, so I covered it, did the oven rise again, and it rose nicely after 90 minutes.

    Baked as directed, got a very nice pull apart soft dinner roll type of loaf out of it.

    The recipe eventually worked, so I'm not giving this one star. I'm guessing that if you're an experienced home baker, you should be able to make these recipes work (note: I've only tried one, but it easily could have been a disaster); if you're looking for a beginner baking book, though, you should probably look elsewhere.

    I'll try a few , and maybe update my review. Something as basic as brioche, though, should have been foolproof.


  5. says:

    Most books on classic French pastry assume far too much knowledge – this one explains properly how to make everything, from basic sponges to elaborate entremets. It's full of tips and tricks to improve your baking, and it also offers gorgeous illustrations and funny stories. It's now in my top 10 baking books, and I have at least a hundred baking books. Really warmly recommended for ambitious bakers.


  6. says:

    Good book on french pastry


  7. says:

    Bought as a gift for a friend who loves baking! She loves it. Very informative with very nice pictures.


  8. says:

    Highly recommend this book. The author explains each step clearly and succinctly. Great images


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The Art of French Pastry: A Cookbook

SUMMARY Î eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Jacquy Pfeiffer, Martha Rose Shulman

LtsExpect to master these techniues and then indulge in exuisite recipes such as brioche napolons Mille Feuilles cream puffs Alsatian cinnamon rolls chinois lemon cream tart with meringue teardrops elephant ears palmiers black forest cake beignets as well as some traditional Alsatian savory treats including Pretzels Kougelhof Tarte Flambe Warm Alsatian Meat Pie Pastry is all about precision so Pfeiffer presents us with an amazing wealth of informationlists of necessary euipment charts on how ingredients react in different environments and the precise weight of ingredients in grams with a look at their euivalent in US unitswhich will help you in all aspects of your cooking B. OK I admit I've only tried one recipe the brioche I make brioche a lot but this particular method was new to me I was going to chuck it and try something else but then I thought what the heck are you buying a pastry how to book for if you're not going to do what it says So I decided I was going to follow every step to the letterEverything went okay until it was time to add butter Supposedly after about 8 10 minutes my interpretation of 2 minutes 2 minutes a repeat of the process a minute or two for error the butter should be completely incorporated I had a butter coated ball of dough It's possible that the author's idea of adding a tiny bit of flour in an earlier step is a lot bigger than mine I wound up adding roughly half again as much flour as was originally called for That gave me an acceptable doughNow for the first rise The author lists a trick for use if the kitchen isn't warm enough He says to fill a small saucepan with about an inch of boiling water put that in a cold oven and that will produce enough heat and humidity for the dough to riseAfraid not After 90 minutes my dough hadn't budged so I did what I usually do set the oven to its lowest setting pop the bowl of dough in set the timer for 2 minutes; at the end of two minutes shut the oven off The lowest setting on my oven is 170F; after two minutes the oven temperature hasn't even registered but it's warmer than the kitchen I leave that to rise Now after 90 minutes it's ready to punch down and put in the fridgeAfter 2 hours in the fridge it's risen barely perceptibly but I punch it down anyway and leave it overnightShaping the dough worked nicely Then he says to let it rise uncovered in a warm humid area I wasn't going to do the boiling water thing again so I did my usual oven rise only uncovered as directed 90 minutes later no rise so I covered it did the oven rise again and it rose nicely after 90 minutesBaked as directed got a very nice pull apart soft dinner roll type of loaf out of itThe recipe eventually worked so I'm not giving this one star I'm guessing that if you're an experienced home baker you should be able to make these recipes work note I've only tried one but it easily could have been a disaster; if you're looking for a beginner baking book though you should probably look elsewhereI'll try a few and maybe update my review Something as basic as brioche though should have been foolproof

READ The Art of French Pastry: A Cookbook

Ut in order to properly enjoy your just desserts so to speak; you will also learn where these delicacies originated Jacuy Pfeiffer comes from a long line of pastry chefs and has been making these recipes since he was a child working in his fathers bakery in Alsace Sprinkled with funny charming memories from a lifetime in pastry this book will have you fully appreciating the hundreds of years of tradition that shaped these recipes into the classics that we know and love and can now serve to our friends and families over and over again The Art of French Pastryfull of gorgeous photography andPfeiffers accompanying illustrations is a master class in pastry from a master teacher. Most books on classic French pastry assume far too much knowledge – this one explains properly how to make everything from basic sponges to elaborate entremets It's full of tips and tricks to improve your baking and it also offers gorgeous illustrations and funny stories It's now in my top 10 baking books and I have at least a hundred baking books Really warmly recommended for ambitious bakers

SUMMARY Î eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ↠ Jacquy Pfeiffer, Martha Rose Shulman

Winner of the 2014 James Beard Award for Best Cookbook Dessert BakingWhat does it take to perfect a flawlessclair A delicate yet buttery croissant To pipe dozens of macarons The answer is an intimate knowledge of the fundamentals of pastry In The Art of French Pastryaward winning pastry chef Jacuy Pfeiffer cofounder of the renowned French Pastry School in Chicago gives you just that By teaching you how to make everything from pte choux to pastry cream Pfeiffer builds on the basics until you have an understanding of the science behind the ingredients used how they interact with one another and what your hands have to do to transform them into pastry This yields glorious resu. Beginning January 2016 I decided to spend a year trying to master making croissants and pain au chocolat I'd never made either but in an article I read in SIFT magazine about baking bread and croissants one baker argued most people don't bake their breads or croissants long enough so they come out pasty looking He said he's always arguing with his customers who complain that the's selling them burnt bread or burnt croissants It was a good article with a photo of a croissant so dark and brown and delicious looking it intrigued me So I thought I'd try it ya know just to see if I could do it I nailed it on my first try that's how fantastic this recipe is and his explanations I recommend this book very highly Me just a normal baker who bakes something like eight times a year was able to nail this Now I make them semi weekly and all of my friends love being on my distribution list

  • Kindle
  • null
  • The Art of French Pastry: A Cookbook
  • Jacquy Pfeiffer, Martha Rose Shulman
  • English
  • 15 April 2018
  • null