CHARACTERS ß Pie Edible

Pie Edible

SUMMARY Pie Edible

And Australia and New Zealand’s endless varieties of meat pie to the Russian kurnik and good old fashioned American apple pieThis delectable salute to the many pies enjoyed the world over will satisfy the appetites of all readers hungry for culinary history and curious about the many varieties of this delightful food and it just might inspire them to don aprons and head for the stov. Pie can hardly be called a global history in good conscience Heavily focused on the English pie and some French influences Pie covers the various aspects that are involved in pie's role in societies mainly from the middle ages onward Although such a small book can hardly contain all variations of pie I don't think Ms Clarkson was right in dismissing the rest of the world The countries she discusses are mainly the UK France the United States Canada and Australia This inexplicable emphasis on English speaking countries I think might simply be the result of Ms Clarkson's source material which according the the bibliography in the back was exclusively English as well Although she provides a recipe for apple strudel in the back arguing that strudel is a pie as well she does not mention the significance of strudel in Austrian culture; nor is any mention spared for possible East European Asian African or South American pies Pie can only be considered a global history if one's world is comprised by the West As far as Western culinary history goes it is a nice readable little booklet with plenty of pictures and old English recipes

CHARACTERS ✓ THARROWEBDESIGN.CO.UK ´ Janet Clarkson

Apple pie Pumpkin pie Shepherd’s pie Chicken potpie Sweet or savory pies are beloved; everyone has a favorite Yet despite its widespread appeal there has never been a book devoted to this humble dish until nowJanet Clarkson in Pie illustrates how what was once a purely pragmatic dish of thick layers of dough has grown into an esteemed creation of culinary art There is as much debate. Damn Fine PieI know author Janet Clarkson She sure does make a damn fine pie As well as any other food She turns her hand and mitten toThe Life of PieI'll try pies from all roundUntil my health forbidsVarieties aboundBut if they're well preparedI like both ones with lidsAnd with their contents baredWhile my verdict's openIf they could be comparedAnd you must know my kenAbout which better faredThen I prefer it whenThe types of pie are suared

Janet Clarkson ´ 1 CHARACTERS

About how to perfect the ideal flaky pastry crust as there is about the very definition of a pie Must it have a top and bottom crust Is a pasty a pie In flavorful detail Clarkson celebrates the pie in all its variations She touches pon the pie’s commercial applications nutritional value and cultural significance; and she examines its international variations from Britain’s pork pie. ‘There is a mystery inherent in a pie by virtue of the contents being hidden beneath its crust’The pie to uote one Victorian writer ‘is a great human discovery which has universal estimation among all civilized eaters’ Of course there are a number of different views about how to define a pie and Ms Clarkson resorted to the following uote by Raymond A Sokolov ‘I may not be able to define a pie but I know one when I see it’Have you ever wondered about the origins of the pie or about the number of different varieties of pies available If you like eating pies do you enjoy making them Is your favourite pie sweet or savouryJanet Clarkson who writes regularly on culinary history has written this delightful book all about pies Ms Clarkson begins by looking at the history of the pie and of pastry making and then discussing different pie designs and fillings‘A pie is invariably acclaimed as a treat and a sign of a caring cook’Did you know for example that pies were sometimes called coffins Or that early pies often had a crust several inches thick and that this crust was not intended to be eaten but to preserve the contents for up to a year The pie was once a very pragmatic dish with a very long shelf life These days pies are often an expression of creative culinary artPies are adaptable and portable and they can be nutritious and tasty It all depends on the cook and the contents The contents A pie can be ‘an economical investment for all miscellaneous savings’ as Charles Dickens wrote in ‘Our Mutual Friend’ it can even contain blackbirds or dancing girls Personally I’d prefer chicken or fruitI enjoyed reading this book on a cold autumn afternoon In addition to all of the wonderfully informative facts and even a selection of historical recipes there are some delightful illustrations It’s interesting too to consider the various international variations Britain’s pork pie; America’s apple pie and Australia’s meat pie And let’s not forget the role of pies in modern culture from Sweeney Todd to Laurel and Hardy the pies have itJennifer Cameron Smith Swimming to the Moon like eating pies do you enjoy making them Is your favourite pie sweet or savouryJanet Clarkson who writes regularly on culinary history has written this delightful book all about pies Ms Clarkson begins by Stir It Up looking at the history of the pie and of pastry making and then discussing different pie designs and fillings‘A pie is invariably acclaimed as a treat and a sign of a caring cook’Did you know for example that pies were sometimes called coffins Or that early pies often had a crust several inches thick and that this crust was not intended to be eaten but to preserve the contents for up to a year The pie was once a very pragmatic dish with a very The Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems long shelf Handbook of Psychophysiology life These days pies are often an expression of creative culinary artPies are adaptable and portable and they can be nutritious and tasty It all depends on the cook and the contents The contents A pie can be ‘an economical investment for all miscellaneous savings’ as Charles Dickens wrote in ‘Our Mutual Friend’ it can even contain blackbirds or dancing girls Personally I’d prefer chicken or fruitI enjoyed reading this book on a cold autumn afternoon In addition to all of the wonderfully informative facts and even a selection of historical recipes there are some delightful illustrations It’s interesting too to consider the various international variations Britain’s pork pie; America’s apple pie and Australia’s meat pie And Frugal Innovation let’s not forget the role of pies in modern culture from Sweeney Todd to Laurel and Hardy the pies have itJennifer Cameron Smith


10 thoughts on “Pie Edible

  1. says:

    Damn Fine PieI know author Janet Clarkson She sure does make a damn fine pie As well as any other food She turns her hand and mitten toThe Life of PieI'll try pies from all roundUntil my health forbidsVarieties aboundBut if they're well preparedI like both ones with lidsAnd with their contents baredWhile my verdict's openIf they could be comparedAnd you must know my kenAbout which better faredThen I prefer it whenThe types of pie are suared


  2. says:

    Regardless of one’s affinity towards sweets or lack thereof; the phrase “As American as apple pie” is a common one A warm crusty slice of pie is as much an ornamental figure of culture as it is actually in bellies Janet Clarkson shares a cultural and social history exploration of pie in Reaktion Books’ “The Edible Series” with “Pie A Global History” “Pie” is a small glossy book filled with full color photos and illustrations breaking the history of pie into a rational chronology Beginning with a brief history lesson of the linguistic and elemental structures of pie crust dough types fillings etc; Clarkson attempts to generalize the advent of pie before moving onward towards types of pies cultural feelings towards pies and other topics The flow of “Pie” makes sense and has a steady pace maintaining reader attentionOne should be forewarned that the focus of “Pie” is a social history and the book is uite brief it can be read in one sitting Therefore it is not highly academic or scholarly and lacks details and advanced historical merit In fact some of the information could be deemed speculative and based on assumption rather than noted research Regardless “Pie” still reveals insightful information and some interesting facts even if not as deep as one would hope Being that Clark’s professional background is in the medical fields versus food or cookery; there is a somewhat clinical and almost ‘school report’ feel to “Pie” versus a passionate yearning to search high and low for the complete history of pie Readers hoping for an all inclusive and thorough look at pies will be disappointed as “Pie” is of a uick and “cute” introduction and overview This makes “Pie” suitable for the average reader with accessible text which is decently written and easy to understand in tone “Pie” features a strong focus on medieval cuisine which brings surprising revelations such as the adamant use of the now expensive and harder to come by spice saffron The conclusion of “Pie” which explores some examples of pie in pop culture or media feels rushed and abrupt ending the book somewhat dejectedly However the appendix offering some pie recipes brings flair to the after word “Pie” at least the edition I read lacks a proper editor as there are some proofing errors such as repeated words ie “There is something called called” pg 71 Even though “Pie” is not a detailed look into the world of these beloved pastries it is a ‘fun’ foray with interesting factoids who knew there was an American Pie Council? which also raise uestions regarding the definition of pie its importance in society and its future “Pie” is a sweet read for a uick non heavy taste of pie pun intended Just be careful if reading while on a diet you WILL crave pie


  3. says:

    Anyone who will asks rhetorical uestions about the philosophy of pie is on the right track Pie is simple goodness but it is also complex ecstasy So much than filling plus crust and just as the euation of Pi is a never ending search for answers the enjoyment of pie is an ongoing adventure of over the top elation and sadly something that I can only enjoy and not create But as long as there are enough creators of pie I will gladly savor their products and not even rest on the SabbathDr Janet Clarkson the author of this book is a medicine professor and a professional doctor Why the hell is she ualified to write about pie? Because that innocent is dissected beyond just regular demolition with a fork Dr Clarkson takes the crust off flake by flake then delves into the deepest darkest and sweetest secrets of pie beyond the unwavering heft of its filling to deduce what it is all about From the nutrient density smell taste mouth feel that makes us love pie to its emotional core she's sieved through the crumbs for us so we can focus on chompingSo the series of rhetorical uestions Dr Clarkson that you may never ask of pie instigates us to think beyond child like glee Deconstructing pie may be your best compliment to Its Roundness whether physically emotionally intellectually or spiritually She presents some amazing information about the medieval provenance of pie how metals and acids were once used in its fillings And the mind blowing architecture of what used to grace noble tables is just phenomenal Beautifully constructed lines such as If you are one of those sweet toothed souls to whom 'pie' means a dessert you have probably been frustrated up to now as meat pies have dominated our story Your time is now come brought a huge grin to my face as pie does when words on an inedible piece of paper elicit that similar effect on you it is undeniably pure pleasureLike any good historian Dr Clarkson warns us to learn from the tragic trappings of times afore Pies such as these repositories of a week's leftovers were once so commonplace as to earn their own names I advise you to have no illusions as to the content of Scrap pies Saturday pies or Old Maid pies She even elevates pie to literary heights did pie attain the status of a Pandora's box in the Middle Ages when you could not be sure of what might greet you when you slit one open?Oh look I have begun to ask rhetorical uestions of pie myself I have been inspired And so will you be when you read Pie


  4. says:

    ‘There is a mystery inherent in a pie by virtue of the contents being hidden beneath its crust’The pie to uote one Victorian writer ‘is a great human discovery which has universal estimation among all civilized eaters’ Of course there are a number of different views about how to define a pie and Ms Clarkson resorted to the following uote by Raymond A Sokolov ‘I may not be able to define a pie but I know one when I see it’Have you ever wondered about the origins of the pie or about the number of different varieties of pies available? If you like eating pies do you enjoy making them? Is your favourite pie sweet or savoury?Janet Clarkson who writes regularly on culinary history has written this delightful book all about pies Ms Clarkson begins by looking at the history of the pie and of pastry making and then discussing different pie designs and fillings‘A pie is invariably acclaimed as a treat and a sign of a caring cook’Did you know for example that pies were sometimes called coffins? Or that early pies often had a crust several inches thick and that this crust was not intended to be eaten but to preserve the contents for up to a year? The pie was once a very pragmatic dish with a very long shelf life These days pies are often an expression of creative culinary artPies are adaptable and portable and they can be nutritious and tasty It all depends on the cook and the contents The contents? A pie can be ‘an economical investment for all miscellaneous savings’ as Charles Dickens wrote in ‘Our Mutual Friend’ it can even contain blackbirds or dancing girls Personally I’d prefer chicken or fruitI enjoyed reading this book on a cold autumn afternoon In addition to all of the wonderfully informative facts and even a selection of historical recipes there are some delightful illustrations It’s interesting too to consider the various international variations Britain’s pork pie; America’s apple pie and Australia’s meat pie And let’s not forget the role of pies in modern culture from Sweeney Todd to Laurel and Hardy the pies have itJennifer Cameron Smith


  5. says:

    its history is uite meaty


  6. says:

    From the Reaktion food series this is a meditation on pie uickly established by two rules it must be in pastry and it must be baked although there are howling exceptions to both rules we must press on Clarkson examines the early days of pie encased in a hard shell to bake with the shell discarded to the low ranking or the pigs the revolution of short crust pastry with lard and enough firewood to fuel ovens sorry southern Europe peasants and hand pies like Cornish pasties the fear of sinister contents of pies from Sweeney Todd to Titus Andronicus cream pies in the face as a comedy staple and the four and twenty blackbirds


  7. says:

    Who wouldn't want to read a book about pie? My only regret is that I didn't have an actual pie to eat whilst reading about pie This book was light and fun and had a pleasant conversational tone which seems just right for pieThough how one can have a chapter on fictional pies and not include Pushing Daisies is beyond me I can only hope that the book was drafted before it started airing even if it was published long after


  8. says:

    Pie can hardly be called a global history in good conscience Heavily focused on the English pie and some French influences Pie covers the various aspects that are involved in pie's role in societies mainly from the middle ages onward Although such a small book can hardly contain all variations of pie I don't think Ms Clarkson was right in dismissing the rest of the world The countries she discusses are mainly the UK France the United States Canada and Australia This inexplicable emphasis on English speaking countries I think might simply be the result of Ms Clarkson's source material which according the the bibliography in the back was exclusively English as well Although she provides a recipe for apple strudel in the back arguing that strudel is a pie as well she does not mention the significance of strudel in Austrian culture; nor is any mention spared for possible East European Asian African or South American pies Pie can only be considered a global history if one's world is comprised by the West As far as Western culinary history goes it is a nice readable little booklet with plenty of pictures and old English recipes


  9. says:

    Like most of the books in this series Pie was a fun read Informative engagingly styled with enticing prose and illustrations and concise Pie is worth an afternoon's indulgence


  10. says:

    Is there anything in the world of food perfectly planned and wholesome than a pie? A whole meal enclosed in a delicious crust Savoury sweet or both like the famous Bedfordshire clanger they deliver everything one needs in a moment of hungriness nourishment great taste and comfort What is the pie? How and when was did it come to existence? What makes a great pie? All these uestions and many are answered in Janet Clarkson’s volume in The Edible Series 'Pie A Global History' Full review at


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