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10 thoughts on “The Kraus Project Essays by Karl Kraus

  1. says:

    Franzen’s translations of somewhat interesting if outdated essays by an Austrian satirist accompanied by entertaining footnotes in which Jonno rants about modern technologies and AOL email and and discusses his late pubescent sex life and shares his pretentious letters to his first wife Nothing about this weird blend of translation scholarship and personal grievance hangs together Good poem by Karl Kraus towards the end Let no one ask what I’ve been doing since I spokeI have nothing to sayand won’t say whyAnd there's a stillness since the earth broke No word was right;a man speaks only from his sleep at night And dreams of a sun that joked It passes; and laterit didn’t matter The Word went under when that world awoke p313


  2. says:

    What an intriguing book So many angles to view it fromFirst of all the reader will ask themselves what the hell is Franzen thinking? Is he recasting himself as a modern day Schopenhauer? And what's with all that ignorant one sided Internet bashing?Which is all to say that Jonathan Franzen's ability to put his foot in his mouth has not disappeared an ability which I believe to be the source of all of the controversy that surrounds him rather than any of his faults as a writer thinker or person He has a way of turning people off with overly strident or glib remarks and this book in the form of his footnotes is a highly concentrated textual document of his glibness What remark turns one reader off will most likely turn another on but there is no doubt that any reader will eventually be turned off at some point by one of Franzen's sweeping judgements or tone deaf categorizations of the Internet a subject he admits to know little of other than that he hates itKraus ostensibly the subject of the book but never really is a similar writer in the sense they both engage in this kind of highly judgmental discourse One senses that this is the reason Franzen chose the 'project' to show that there's a tradition a literary one no less behind the outright dismissal Franzen makes a rather severe tactical or perhaps philosophical error here Franzen has chose to fight what he believes to be the stupidity of Internet discourse by using its main weapon of stupidity again the sweeping judgement The tone of Franzen's takedowns of seemingly random targets like Dylan or Salman Rushdie for joining Twitter for Christssakes; saying he thought he was above that aren't unfamiliar to the tone of YouTube comments Another severe blind spot in Franzen's critiue is his ability to insert himself often without much relevance at all into Kraus's commentaries These autobiographical intrusions would be acceptable in a blogger but in a piece of high minded criticism they feel uite narcissistic and damningly uninteresting For someone attacking social media so stridently the narcissism feels grossly inappropriate as it seems to be a reflection of the culture which social media has created To be fair to Franzen his mea and mys may be because as he puts it he's a child of the sixties thus coming of age in the me generationBut as much as a disservice he does to the argument and I think he does uite a bit Franzen has a point There is a conspiracy of silence in mounting the kind of critiue which Franzen presents one which is barely apparent in print media aside from a few stray Luddites And there is something limiting about the short attention span digestible idea the ideas which make up the discourse of the TED talk generation the most popular platitudes of which confuse profundity with agreeableness And I enjoyed his excavation of Kraus a figure I don't believe I'd ever heard mentioned before but yet was read by some of my favourite authors excuse the my; I'm something of a blogger and have no interest in shaming people out of using the internet Kraus is a abstract version of his eminently abstract countrymen and in about 90% of Heine and His Conseueces I understand exactly what he was saying when not being distracted by the pop up ad esue footnotes So in a lot of ways I think Franzen has done something important in revitalizing Kraus's reputation and writing down his own opinions on the modern world and has also spoken some truth But I was reminded of the uote by Samuel Johnson the great censurer throughoutCensure is willingly indulged because it always implies some superiorityIn this eerily accurate assessment both Franzen and the troll can be found


  3. says:

    This is like if you had to translate Michael Musto's column for people living 50 years later and had to explain all the cultural references If your first thought is 'But Michael Musto doesn't expect his ephemera to be read by posterity; if he did he would write in a timeless style not relying on a complex web of personal and highly topical references' then brother I am right there with youBut also you have to do it semi auto biographically a la Into the Wild explaining where you were in your life when you read it and the ways in which you identified with it and it influenced your lifeThe best thing about this book is of course Franzen's own skewering of culture in the footnotes but the second best thing is that it's bi lingual so you only have to read half the pages


  4. says:

    Franzen is utterly insufferable Kraus is excellent except when he's incomprehensible; some of this is no doubt a result of the man's own style but I'm not sure an American novelist is the best modern midwife for an English version of a Viennese satirist's century old essays But I don't read German so I won't uibble Franzen has done the curious among us a favor by bringing Kraus's essays to our language at all Translation matters aside it's evident that our modern age's most self involved novelist has simply used Kraus's work as a platform to memoir ize his early 20s and rant about his innumerable technological and cultural bêtes noirs Even when he makes a rare trenchant point I find myself so irritated with Franzen's overweening sense of self importance – if anything made even worse by his vast need to be loved – that I come to loathe my own opinion What is perhaps most irritating about this whole enterprise is that Jon Franzen is purportedly A NOVELIST which means he probably ought to be working out his complicated relationship with himself and modernity and his past and his artistic predecessors and his ex wife and 1980s Euro punks and 1840s German Jewish poets and 1910s Austrian Jewish Catholic Jewish polemicists and Jeff Bezos and America Online and smartphones THROUGH THE MEDIUM OF FICTION rather than ham handed modern cultural criticism and self denying political commentary disguised as explanatory footnotes to another man's work By the second half of the book he gives up the game and simply uses the bottom of the page as space to write tangential and sometimes completely unrelated small format biographical essaysThe book's only saving grace is the very smart historical context and analysis provided by Paul Reitter – an American academic and a legitimate expert on Kraus – who in his own understated humane but persistent way highlights the very real differences between real scholarship and self justifying vanity project bullshitOh and PS — Franzen blatantly rips off David Foster Wallace in at least one place – p 21 fn 13 is a straight up unattributed theft of Wallace's crank turner imagery from the early '90s McCaffrey interview in the Journal Review? of Contemporary Fiction or somesuch and Franzen either fails to remember or doesn't have the decency to acknowledge that he stole the construction from one of his betters – and directly channels him without mentioning his name on a number of other occasions These tend to be the aforementioned rare occasions when he makes a decent point Far be it from me to criticize a guy for adopting other people's intelligent arguments and good ideas as his own but it sheds a whole different light on the theme of Oedipal competition and slaying of literary predecessors etc that appears throughout the commentary Wallace seems to me to be a huge presence in this book but Franzen mentions him only once unflatteringly when he notes that notwithstanding his own reputation as a critic of older American novelists David Foster Wallace was the one who actually called Updike an asshole in print God Franzen is such an asshole


  5. says:

    This is an odd book I may be one of very few people who read it bc it is about Kraus rather than bc it was produced by Franzen It surely would not have been published if it hadn't had Franzen's name on the cover As a college student Franzen got interested in the Viennese essayist Karl Kraus 1874 1936 This book consists of 2 lengthy essays by Kraus 2 shorter pieces associated with one of the essays and a short poem The essays are about 2 19th Century German writers Heine and Nestroy Kraus detested Heine and loved Nestroy and made his case in these essays The most striking thing about the book is its spatial typography The essays are presented in the original German on left hand pages with Franzen's translation on the facing right hand pages Because Kraus's German is so hard to translate the reader is meant to be able to consult the original German as needed But the largest part of the book literally is the footnotes that explainelaboratetake off from the text Since the footnotes are of course at the foot of the pages and not at the end the book must have been a typographical nightmare for the editor Since the footnotes are to the English text and so always begin on the right pages this often results in blank space on the left hand pages And since several of the footnotes are extremely long it also results in many pages actually 50 that are only footnotes The typesetting and footnoting of the book is so unusual that I did a scan of the book rounding to tenths of pages and then adding up Here is the typesetting topology of the book Of the roughly 300 content ful pages of the book 64 pages are German text Conseuently 64 pages are English translation English tends to be slightly compressed than German but that didn't make a relevant difference here Because the footnotes only begin on right hand pages there is inevitable blank space on many left hand pages This blank space incredibly amounts to 36 pages worth The footnotes amount to about 133 pages Now for the footnotes Franzen is not an expert in German literature or in German culture so he makes regular use of commentary by Paul Reitter for insight into Kraus and comments from Daniel Kehlmann for insights into German Austrian culture 48 pages worth of footnotes are from Reitter; 6 pages worth are from Kehlmann That leaves 79 pages worth of footnotes for Franzen He discusses some problems of translation and interpretation but mostly he offers us an autobiographical commentary about what Kraus has meant to him and a cultural commentary on what Kraus's thoughts might mean for our modern world For example Kraus in the essay on Heine is inveighing against a popular style of short essay called the feuilleton Franzen sees the blog as a contemporary version of the feuilleton and so uses this as a launching pad for his own critiue I'm impressed that FSG published this and that we have these translations with helpful commentary The cultural commentary and personal autobiography by Franzen was rather indulgent but uite readable In sum I liked it but it wasn't anything greatUpdate 11214 See my review of Wittgenstein's Vienna for and better on Kraus


  6. says:

    I like Franzen's writing a lot I was curious about Kraus Unfortunately this book is not an illumination of Kraus Instead it's a series of really long footnotes about Franzen's life as a young studentwannabe writer in Germany which while somewhat interesting did not help me to understand Kraus They just distracted me from the Kraus text interrupting the flow and not helping me to understand Kraus' difficult writing The footnotes provided by Paul Reitter and Daniel Kehlmann were far helpful And although I'm very interested in and in agreement with some of Franzen's thoughts on technology it's a little bit hard to take seriously someone who uses examples from AOL to prove his point


  7. says:

    Hoping to have a review written within a month or so for now will just say that I'm both enjoying very much and already cringing at the glib antagonism it'll almost certainly stir up on publication in October


  8. says:

    Kraus Project by Jonathan Franzen is a hybrid bookIt contains on the upper part of each page on the left side the original German text of four essays and a poem by the Austrian author Karl Kraus mirrored by the English translation of the respective text on the opposite right pageOn the lower part of each page are numerous footnotes that are sometimes longer than Kraus' text itself The footnotes are partly by Jonathan Franzen partly by the Kraus scholar Paul Reitter partly by the German Austrian novelist Daniel Kehlmann like Franzen an admirer of Kraus Franzen is also the translator of Kraus' textsSince Karl Kraus is almost unknown in the English speaking world the publisher obviously thought it a good idea to bring this book on the market with Jonathan Franzen as author on the title page But again this book is a translated and annotated collection of some of Kraus' textsA few words about Karl Krauscoming from a wealthy assimilated Jewish family Kraus grew up in Vienna at the end of the 19th century Vienna was at that time a melting pot of people and ideas Literature and theater two lifelong passions of Kraus were at its height Sigmund Freud developed psychoanalysis that revolutionized later many aspects of our lives Mahler and Schönberg revolutionized music Adolf Loos Kraus closest friend revolutionized architecture the Vienna school of economists revolutionized economics the Vienna Circle and Ludwig Wittgenstein revolutionized philosophy All kind of modern ideologies came to light in that period in Vienna including the modern racial Antisemitism and his natural reaction Zionism whose main propagandist was the journalist Theodor Herzl a former colleague of Kraus who would become one of his most hated targetsVienna's streets are paved with culture; the streets of other capitals are paved with asphaltis a popular aphorism by KrausIn this hotbed of culture and ideologies the typical Kaffeehauskultur developed where each faction of intellectuals had their favorite coffeehouses where they met and engaged in group and cartel building gossiping writing and reading Kraus was part of this culture but never belonged to any group One of his most remarkable features is that he successfully obtained his absolute independence during all his intellectual lifeKraus' main work are the roughly 40000 pages of his journal Die Fackel The Torch which he published between 1899 and 1936 In the first years he admitted every now and then guest authors but from 1912 on he wrote the journal exclusively by himselfDie Fackel had a blog like feel Kraus' was publishing whenever he had something to say and about whatever he felt he needed something to say Although literature and theater were always prominent topics in Die Fackel Kraus was an avid reader of the Austrian and foreign press and from here he took most of his inspirationsKraus was writing about foreign and local policy about the situation of workers in the factories about women's rights he was an early advocate of eual rights of homosexuals and he was an everyday observer of the journalism in Austria which was in an extremely bad shape according to KrausThis opposition to the freuently badly written journalism made Kraus many enemies especially since he combined it with irony and sarcasm but also with undeniable truths His lawyer was for sure a very busy man and it is said that Kraus won almost all his court cases He knew the rules and acted within these rules very efficiently to expose corruption nepotism stupidity and wrong use of languageHe did all this in a uniue style freuently playing with words and creating a richness of aphorisms that may be rivaled only by Lichtenberg He was also a stage persona he gave than 700 performances reading singing acting alone on a stage his audience consisted mainly of addicted Kraus fans; Elias Canetti for example said in his autobiography that he visited than 300 of Kraus' uniue performances Kraus must have been a magnetic personality that had many people under his spellThe two main pieces in The Kraus Project are Kraus' most famous essays on the German Jewish poet Heinrich Heine and on the Austrian playwright Johann NestroyHeine is for Kraus on the one hand a great and extremely popular poet Many of his poems were turned into popular songs and are part of the folk poetry But Heine's followers turn his spirit into something superficial And this is not by accident it is because of specific virtues in Heine's works In Kraus' times there was a firm belief of many intellectuals that there was a deep difference between Romance and German culture As Kraus put itTwo strains of intellectual vulgarity defenselessness against content and defenselessness against form The one experiences only the material side of art It is of German origin The other experiences even the rawest of materials artistically It is of romance origin To the one art is an instrument; to the other life is an ornament In which hell would the artist prefer to fry? He'd surely still rather live among the Germans For although they've strapped art into the Procrustean Folding Bed of their commerce they've also made life sober and this is a blessing fantasy thrives and every man can put his own light in the barren window frames Just spare me the pretty ribbonsAustria although linguistically part of German culture is for Kraus deeply affected by the French poet Heine Even the biggest Anti semites forgave Heine his Jewish origin just because his verses appeal so much to the tendency of most of the Vienna literati to gloss over everything with patches of jokes and irony I owe The Kraus Project the information that young Adolf Hitler in his Vienna years supported an initiative to build a monument for Heine Heine's poems were later not removed from the school books in Nazi Germany just his name; it was all supposed to be folk poetry thenWhile the Heine essay is very acerbic in it's evaluation of the poems of this great German writer the big hater Kraus shows in the other main essay that he can be also a great admirer and lover he re discovers the Austrian actor singer playwright Johann Nestroy a popular performer of the first part of the 19th century who fell into oblivion soon after his deathThat Nestroy is nowadays considered to be one of the greatest authors for theater in German is almost exclusively a result of the decades of Kraus' efforts to make him again popular I love Nestroy's plays and there is hardly anything with the exception of Shakespeare and the obscure play Datterich by Ernst Elias Niebergall written in Darmstadt dialect that I enjoy on a stage than his plays To me the Nestroy essay is Kraus's best essay the Heine piece although very interesting shows also a side of Kraus that is not very appealing the text is not free from Anti semitic slursFranzen's translation is a heroic and brave effort and mostly very decent in my opinion Kraus is extremely difficult to translate and that he tackled this task deserves a lot of respectThe footnotes are freuently related directly to the text Paul Reitter adds a lot of his knowledge about Kraus much to the profit of the reader Also many of Franzen's and Kehlmann's footnotes are interesting The one thing that surprised me was that Franzen is dragging the reader a lot into his personal life during the time he lived in Germany and Austria as a student We learn a lot about the person Jonathan Franzen including the story of his failed first marriage and a short bout of mental illness when he was in Germany If you like Jonathan Franzen as an author I do you might as well enjoy this part of the annotations but if not you will have to skip some of them I am still wondering if it wouldn't have been better to split the book in two a translation of Kraus only and a longer essay with Franzen's view of KrausKraus was a larger than life author His play Die letzten Tage der Menschheit The Last Days of Mankind is about 800 pages long The Kraus Project gives some insight in part of his work but those who would like to discover the full Kraus and also the Vienna of his times because most of his work can be only understood from the context should maybe read in parallel also Carl Schorske's excellent book Fin de siècle Vienna Politics and CultureLet me close with a poem by Karl Kraus in which he explains why he kept silent for a long time after the Nazis took power in GermanyLet no one ask what I've been doing since I spokeI have nothing to sayand won't say whyAnd there's stillness since the earth brokeNo word was right;a man speaks only from his sleep at nightAnd dreams of a sun that jokedIt passes; and laterit didn't matterThe Word went under when that world awoke Man frage nicht was all die Zeit ich machteIch bleibe stumm;und sage nicht warumUnd Stille gibt es da die Erde krachteKein Wort das traf;man spricht nur aus dem SchlafUnd träumt von einer Sonne welche lachteEs geht vorbei;nachher war's einerleiDas Wort entschlief als jene Welt erwachte


  9. says:

    Any normal person will stop reading nowThis spring I’ve been a basketcase emotional With intention I’ve been striking into several projects that distract my head voices that improve my ego that feed my knowledge spot And so I picked up this bookWhat? Really?Yes Really The me of ten years ago kept her finger on the pulse of certain cultural dust ups Ten years ago me would have read every word of The Guardian piece an article length redaction of the Franzen bits of this book I suspect published September 2013 But because I was too involved with other ridiculouses namely a high profile work project that has yet to disclose its rewards I missed it The article has been pulled offline I devoted the best parts of my head to the soul sucking of work and I missed it The forensics Google searches resulting in excited headlines of months old magazine pieces I’m able to put on this article indicate the theme is technology’s ruination of literary and critical writing Eg “While we are busy tweeting texting and spending the world is drifting towards disaster believes Jonathan Franzen whose despair at our insatiable technoconsumerism echoes the apocalyptic essays of the satirist Karl Kraus – 'the Great Hater’”I’m angry and repulsed by this constant state How can I get out of it? Find an angier person who can’t hurt me? Franzen is reliably angrier than I can ever be Right? And he’s writing about this obscure early 20th century Austrian essayist who hates than he? This could be a dose of good clean DULL angerWhile the echoes of the debate are Google able the comments to the original article are uniformly along the lines of proclaiming Franzen little than a crank a Luddite a White Male arguing self interest in preservation rather than revolution in the literary arts This my unsupported inflammatory summary of the “anti Franzen” side of the dialogue I’m less interested in archiving highlights in this debate than I am touching on impressions while reading the book It’s interesting though that both Franzen and his critics both use hyperbole pathos fallacy and also focus on one point that unpacks neatly to illustrate “evidence” for their theses I suppose it’s a rhetorical techniue to argue one’s point this way but to a suspecting reader the author seems to erect panes into a glass houseSo to the library to check out this book What is this book? It’s one of the stranger books I’ve decided to read for “fun” It’s a multi layered conversation On the verso the original German of a few of Kraus’ essays in one he is said to lampoon a beloved 19th century poet; in another he “celebrates” his favorite Austrian literary artist On the recto Franzen’s translation In the footnotes explanation pondering commentary modern day riffs from Franzen and two other guys the Kraus scholar Paul Reitter and the Austrian author Daniel Kehlmann The scholars are asked to do the heavy lifting to provide historical and cultural context Reitter is also allowed to drift into describing what Kraus may have “actually meant” here and there It did seem to me that Franzen took advantage of these scholars I imagined Franzen’s “celebrity” wowwing Reitter and Kehlmann into submitting their work to this book I hope Franzen did the right thing to make sure these two were compensated for their work Particularly when Franzen writes in his footnotes that too many writers are giving their work away in the blog marketplaceI read none of the main textI read only the footnotesAnd I read only the footnotes that Franzen wroteAnd I read only the footnotes that Franzen wrote that concerned his life his writing and his views on the art of writingAnd I got a hell of a lot out of my reading And continue to turn over some of the ideas brought out in teeny font of those rambling footnotesOn the root of anger being the desire for uality pp 110 120On the erosive technology capitalism connection and the importance to use technologies to its purpose rather than adapt purpose to the technologies p 141On the importance of diversity and empathy of embracing conflict to meaningful art p 158On discovering truths about human nature through conflict pp 214 217On the connection between cultivating an audience and an artist’s responsibility to its audience to create “good” art which by definition ought provoke pp 270 272On the uestion of the artist’s medium of engagement with its audience pp 273 293Salman Rushdie’s Tweet in response to Franzen’s opinion that Rushdie ought to know better than engage his audience in 160 character chunks“Dear ‪#Franzen ‪MargaretAtwood ‪JoyceCarolOates ‪nycnovel ‪NathanEnglander ‪Shteyngart and I are fine with Twitter Enjoy your ivory tower”Franzen’s an angry middle aged crank But I can’t pass judgment I’m Ms Crankypants


  10. says:

    Sadly Franzen's translation has not helped me to understand Karl Kraus Paul Reitter's footnotes were useful to some extent and Jonathan Franzen's footnotes were interesting enough and entertaining occasionally in an I want to shout at you way But I am still fairly mystified as to what on earth Kraus meant as indeed Franzen Reitter and Kehlmann admit to being at various points Which makes the project slightly likeable I suppose


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The Kraus Project Essays by Karl Kraus

Free download ☆ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ Jonathan Franzen

A great American writer’s confrontation with a great European critic a personal and intellectual awakeningA hundred years ago the Viennese satirist Karl Kraus was among the most penetrating and farsighted writers in Europe In his self published magazine Die Fackel Kraus brilliantly attacked the popular media’s manipulation of reality the dehumanizing machinery of technology and consumer capitalism and the jingoistic rhetoric of a fading empire But even though he had a fervent following which included Franz Kafka and Walter Benjamin he remained something of a lonely prophet and few p What an intriguing book So many angles to view it fromFirst of all the reader will ask themselves what the hell is Franzen thinking Is he recasting himself as a modern day Schopenhauer And what's with all that ignorant one sided Internet bashingWhich is all to say that Jonathan Franzen's ability to put his foot in his mouth has not disappeared an ability which I believe to be the source of all of the controversy that surrounds him rather than any of his faults as a writer thinker or person He has a way of turning people off with overly strident or glib remarks and this book in the form of his footnotes is a highly concentrated textual document of his glibness What remark turns one reader off will most likely turn another on but there is no doubt that any reader will eventually be turned off at some point by one of Franzen's sweeping judgements or tone deaf categorizations of the Internet a subject he admits to know little of other than that he hates itKraus ostensibly the subject of the book but never really is a similar writer in the sense they both engage in this kind of highly judgmental discourse One senses that this is the reason Franzen chose the 'project' to show that there's a tradition a literary one no less behind the outright dismissal Franzen makes a rather severe tactical or perhaps philosophical error here Franzen has chose to fight what he believes to be the stupidity of Internet discourse by using its main weapon of stupidity again the sweeping judgement The tone of Franzen's takedowns of seemingly random targets like Dylan or Salman Rushdie for joining Twitter for Christssakes; saying he thought he was above that aren't unfamiliar to the tone of YouTube comments Another severe blind spot in Franzen's critiue is his ability to insert himself often without much relevance at all into Kraus's commentaries These autobiographical intrusions would be acceptable in a blogger but in a piece of high minded criticism they feel uite narcissistic and damningly uninteresting For someone attacking social media so stridently the narcissism feels grossly inappropriate as it seems to be a reflection of the culture which social media has created To be fair to Franzen his mea and mys may be because as he puts it he's a child of the sixties thus coming of age in the me generationBut as much as a disservice he does to the argument and I think he does uite a bit Franzen has a point There is a conspiracy of silence in mounting the kind of critiue which Franzen presents one which is barely apparent in print media aside from a few stray Luddites And there is something limiting about the short attention span digestible idea the ideas which make up the discourse of the TED talk generation the most popular platitudes of which confuse profundity with agreeableness And I enjoyed his excavation of Kraus a figure I don't believe I'd ever heard mentioned before but yet was read by some of my favourite authors excuse the my; I'm something of a blogger and have no interest in shaming people out of using the internet Kraus is a abstract version of his eminently abstract countrymen and in about 90% of Heine and His Conseueces I understand exactly what he was saying when not being distracted by the pop up ad esue footnotes So in a lot of ways I think Franzen has done something important in revitalizing Kraus's reputation and writing down his own opinions on the modern world and has also spoken some truth But I was reminded of the uote by Samuel Johnson the great censurer throughoutCensure is willingly indulged because it always implies some superiorityIn this eerily accurate assessment both Franzen and the troll can be found

Characters The Kraus Project Essays by Karl Kraus

Eople today are familiar with his work Luckily Jonathan Franzen is one of themIn The Kraus Project Franzen whose “calm passionate critical authority” has been praised in The New York Times Book Review not only presents his definitive new translations of Kraus but annotates them spectacularly with supplementary notes from the Kraus scholar Paul Reitter and the Austrian author Daniel Kehlmann Kraus was a notoriously cantankerous and difficult writer and in Franzen he has found his match a novelist unafraid to voice unpopular opinions strongly a critic capable of untangling Kraus’s o I like Franzen's writing a lot I was curious about Kraus Unfortunately this book is not an illumination of Kraus Instead it's a series of really long footnotes about Franzen's life as a young studentwannabe writer in Germany which while somewhat interesting did not help me to understand Kraus They just distracted me from the Kraus text interrupting the flow and not helping me to understand Kraus' difficult writing The footnotes provided by Paul Reitter and Daniel Kehlmann were far helpful And although I'm very interested in and in agreement with some of Franzen's thoughts on technology it's a little bit hard to take seriously someone who uses examples from AOL to prove his point

Free download ☆ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ Jonathan Franzen

Ften dense arguments to reveal their relevance to contemporary AmericaWhile Kraus is lampooning the iconic German poet and essayist Heinrich Heine and celebrating his own literary hero the Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy Franzen is annotating Kraus the way Kraus annotated others surveying today’s cultural and technological landscape with fearsome clarity and giving us a deeply personal recollection of his first year out of college when he fell in love with Kraus’s work Painstakingly wrought strikingly original in form The Kraus Project is a feast of thought passion and literature Hoping to have a review written within a month or so for now will just say that I'm both enjoying very much and already cringing at the glib antagonism it'll almost certainly stir up on publication in October

  • Hardcover
  • 336
  • The Kraus Project Essays by Karl Kraus
  • Jonathan Franzen
  • English
  • 16 July 2019
  • 9780374182212

About the Author: Jonathan Franzen

Jonathan Franzen is the author of The Corrections winner of the 2001 National Book Award for fiction; the novels The Twenty Seventh City and Strong Motion; and two works of nonfiction How to Be Alone and The Discomfort Zone all published by FSG His fourth novel Freedom was published in the fall of 2010Franzen's other honors include a 1988 Whiting Writers' Award Granta's Best Of Young Ameri