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The Wild Place

review The Wild Place

Operation HumanityThey came to the former storm troopers' camp packed into cattle cars They were the hum This book is amazing Kathryn Hulme was part of the United Nations team to go into Europe immediately upon the close of World War Two and try to take care of millions of displaced persons She was in charge of a huge camp in Bavaria and then she moved into other management positions as the effort dragged on and this entity or that changed its involvement while she and her co workers simply changed hats to stick with the job Putting the politics aside they stayed to the bitter end trying to get every person a new home a new country most of the time and a job She is the epitome of the single person who makes a major difference in the story of humanity by doing one thing at a time moving one mountain at a time changing the lives of millions in the end It's a great sad powerful bookIt is a shame that her literary affairs were left in a mess after the death of her partner who inherited everything from her so that this and her other books are out of print I found an original copy among the books we inherited from my mother in law If you can find it this is a book I recommend very highly

download Ô eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ✓ Kathryn Hulme

An reckage of World War II the displaced personsWaiting to receive them was a handful of workers dedicat I very nearly started this off by saying the book tells the untold story of the disposition of displaced persons in the aftermath of WWII Clearly the story has been told This then is the forgotten story of what happened to many hundreds of thousands of people in the months and years after the warThis is one telling of the story of the largest planned mass migration in history and how that migration was affected by the fall of the iron curtain the creation of Israel the start of the Korean conflict and the lethargic changes to the immigration policies of the USAWildflecken the wild place was built by Hitler as a training camp for SS ski troops After the war it housed 20000 DP's primarily Polish The population of the camp was in constant flux people came and went all the time Hulme doesn't try to tell the story of a city for that's essentially what the camp was but instead concentrates on individuals her driver her translator the camp police chief her coworkersThe book is full of joy people going home after years of slavery people starting new lives and heartache imagine sending trainloads of people home to Poland only to watch the Iron Curtain fallRecommended

Kathryn Hulme ✓ 7 free download

Ed to one of humanity's most gigantic tasks the resettlement of than two million people without a countr Recommendation from a friendit is a short but impactful story that brought to life many images that I had seen in movies over the years It also brought back to mind the often used label of DP that was used casually by kids in the 60's and 70's Kathryn Hulme is a beautiful writer and her skill combined with her experience and perspective bring this story to life in a way few others could Of note there are 15 reviews on for the ebook and they are all 5 star ratings Almost every person who wrote a review had a personal connection to someone who had first hand experience in the camp This is a book that will make you appreciate your freedom and be grateful for all that our predecessors have done to secure our freedom Lunastus is a short but Timetrap impactful story that brought to life many Cache images that I had seen Cache in movies over the years It also brought back to mind the often used label of DP that was used casually by kids The academic library in the 60's and 70's Kathryn Hulme The Cliterate Male: a Primer on Pleasuring Women (Good in Bed Guides) is a beautiful writer and her skill combined with her experience and perspective bring this story to life Pie: A Global History in a way few others could Of note there are 15 reviews on for the ebook and they are all 5 star ratings Almost every person who wrote a review had a personal connection to someone who had first hand experience Les décisions absurdes : Sociologie des erreurs radicales et persistantes in the camp This Needful is a book that will make you appreciate your freedom and be grateful for all that our predecessors have done to secure our freedom


10 thoughts on “The Wild Place

  1. says:

    “An unforgettable report on the struggle the plight the defeat or the eventual redemption of countless victims of the time” — George Shuster The New York Times“A shattering book and one that defines once and for all the meaning of that ghastly twentieth century invention the displaced person” — The New Yorker“The Wild Place is a rare book — powerful and exciting compassionate and disturbing tragic and funny — drawn from great and strange material It is a verbatim record of the most dramatic human debris of our time the homeless hordes left on deposit in Germany” — The New Yorker“Little has been recorded of the heroic postwar work with masses of displaced persons and it will be hard to find a better account than this It is crowded with people and incidents and has a special vitality as well as the ring of truth Highly recommended” — Library Journal“Miss Hulme’s story will seize your imagination keep you fascinated rouse your compassion admiration and respect The top book of American nonfiction published this year” — San Francisco Chronicle“A beautiful book heartbreaking and at the same time veined with humor It projects the passionate sense of purpose experienced by a compassionate woman struggling desperately to salvage human lives and it leaves us with a uickened awareness of the astounding tenacity of the human spirit the astounding durability of hope” — The Atlantic Monthly“A sensitive and moving report by an UNRRA field worker of her five years’ experience in European DP camps after the war” — Henry L Roberts Foreign Affairs“A deeply felt and deeply moving record of this whole tragedy of displacement and dispossession this is certain to engage the heart of any reader who has one” — Kirkus ReviewsHighly recommended Review to come


  2. says:

    The Wild Place is Kathryn Hulme's account of the 5 years 1945 1950 she spent as an administrator at several camps for displaced persons DPs in Germany after WWII ended It is a book that I wish people could read but due to estate problems it has been out of print for ages And since its publication run in 1953 was fairly limited there aren't a lot of used copies floating around either It's an absolute shame because Hulme was a magnificent writer the book won the Atlantic Monthly non fiction award for 1953 and the insights she imparts are particularly relevant to our current national discussion about refugeesI'd been aware through the also hard to locate documentary film The Long Way Home that many Jewish people languished in DP camps after liberation They couldn't go home to where the war had certainly not eradicated anti Semitism and Britain dragged its heels on allowing them into the British Mandate of Palestine I had been less aware that many non Jewish people faced similar circumstances Many of the Poles at Wildflecken for instance would have found their hometowns now part of the USSR rather than Poland And even if they harbored hopes of returning to post Potsdam Poland it soon became clear that the free elections the country had been promised were anything but and Poland effectively became a Soviet satellite The early chapters of The Wild Place deal with Hulme's introduction to the almost overwhelming logistics of maintaining order in what amounted to small city of 20000 people set in the midst of a country whose own people were struggling to return to some sense of normalcy after the war It's almost amusing to read about camp residents stealing cows from the local farmers but then you think those farmers may have hated Hitler too At first there is a sense of optimism that the majority of DPs will be resettled soon and the camp just has to get them through one winter a task that is less daunting once generous care packages of food start arriving from the Red Cross But as time grinds on it becomes obvious that the path forward for most DPs is anything but clear and certainI cried at least three times reading this 260 page book The first incident involved the enterprising young man Ignatz who had become Hulme's chauffeur after managing to cobble together the spare parts needed to repair an abandoned automobile He tearfully informed Hulme that his baby had died She had not even known that he had a new baby let alone that the infant was ill view spoilerIgnatz held open the door of his room gesturing us to precede him into the steamy sanctum that contained all he cherished on earth In one startled glance I saw for the first time his young child faced wife the small daughter clinging in fright to her skirts and the handmade crib in a corner of the room hiding a high puffed lace pillow with a tiny shape upon it so infinitesimally small that is made no indentation The Venezuelan doctor leaned over the crib and murmured in his own tongue Prematura He touched the minute blue fingers through which a cotton lily had been drawn Possibly a seven month baby he said which should never have been taken from hospital inside of two or three months The infant had perished of malnutrition in its fifth week Chouka was saying in a low shocked voice Ignatz why didn't you come to us? but it was only a rhetorical uestion She knew that he could not have borne to have his wife and baby moved back to the hospital as she would promptly have ordered Even as she asked the uestion the little wife moved closer to her man in fright Another dangerous separation threatened Ignatz stood with his hands clasped in front of him like a culprit awaiting sentenceThen he said Tonight Schwester can we keep him with us? In his eyes was the knowledge of the dreary basement under Chouka's TB hospital that we used for the camp morgue He had helped her hospital manager to pour cement and make a mortuary table so bodies would no longer have to lie upon the floor He also knew the camp rules prompt removal to the mortuary after deathThe doctor nodded permission and said to us in French After all starvation is not contagiousChouka went over to the crib and lit the one white candle standing at its head on the window sill The candle holder was a jam tin that Ignatz had cut and curled into a shiny decorative tray Beside it stood the parts of a salvaged carburetor he was rebuilding for my car He knew how to do absolutely everything except ask for help hide spoiler


  3. says:

    This book is amazing Kathryn Hulme was part of the United Nations team to go into Europe immediately upon the close of World War Two and try to take care of millions of displaced persons She was in charge of a huge camp in Bavaria and then she moved into other management positions as the effort dragged on and this entity or that changed its involvement while she and her co workers simply changed hats to stick with the job Putting the politics aside they stayed to the bitter end trying to get every person a new home a new country most of the time and a job She is the epitome of the single person who makes a major difference in the story of humanity by doing one thing at a time moving one mountain at a time changing the lives of millions in the end It's a great sad powerful bookIt is a shame that her literary affairs were left in a mess after the death of her partner who inherited everything from her so that this and her other books are out of print I found an original copy among the books we inherited from my mother in law If you can find it this is a book I recommend very highly


  4. says:

    I very nearly started this off by saying the book tells the untold story of the disposition of displaced persons in the aftermath of WWII Clearly the story has been told This then is the forgotten story of what happened to many hundreds of thousands of people in the months and years after the warThis is one telling of the story of the largest planned mass migration in history and how that migration was affected by the fall of the iron curtain the creation of Israel the start of the Korean conflict and the lethargic changes to the immigration policies of the USAWildflecken the wild place was built by Hitler as a training camp for SS ski troops After the war it housed 20000 DP's primarily Polish The population of the camp was in constant flux people came and went all the time Hulme doesn't try to tell the story of a city for that's essentially what the camp was but instead concentrates on individuals her driver her translator the camp police chief her coworkersThe book is full of joy people going home after years of slavery people starting new lives and heartache imagine sending trainloads of people home to Poland only to watch the Iron Curtain fallRecommended


  5. says:

    I was living and working in this area of Germany for years with the DOD It was very hard to leave for reasons that are very difficult to explain The book is a very good telling of the times before I arrived and why the DOD left the Wildflecken Military Installation in place for so many many years It's a magical place full of history and ghosts The small mountains forests and terrain have a strange uality about them Still largely unchanged and unspoiled so much old history for the miles of tiny villages and the monastery with lively monks and ghost roaming the halls and little cathedral serving beer and real German fare I just wanted to know the actual reasons and history of why it was occupied so many times by soldiers and holy men and despots and prisoners who you swear you can hear whispering in the woods where they were housed for so many years Read it


  6. says:

    Excellent book I was born there so always had an interst in finding a copy I really enjoyed the story by Kathryn Great read


  7. says:

    Recommendation from a friendit is a short but impactful story that brought to life many images that I had seen in movies over the years It also brought back to mind the often used label of DP that was used casually by kids in the 60's and 70's Kathryn Hulme is a beautiful writer and her skill combined with her experience and perspective bring this story to life in a way few others could Of note there are 15 reviews on for the ebook and they are all 5 star ratings Almost every person who wrote a review had a personal connection to someone who had first hand experience in the camp This is a book that will make you appreciate your freedom and be grateful for all that our predecessors have done to secure our freedom


  8. says:

    I read this in college when I was reading all of Hulme's books that I could find and have wanted to re read it but it's out of print So I was glad to find a Kindle edition For five years she was an administrator at several camps for displaced persons in Germany When I read it the first time I didn't know much about post WWII stuff just that there were a lot of refugees and some came to the US She goes into the politics of how people were sent to various places and how the US was uite late in accepting people But it's her interesting in people's stories and her obvious concern and love for them that really makes it I also know about Hulme who was a devotee of Gurdjieff in Paris in the 30s The nurse on her team is the former nun whose story she later told in her bestseller and they were lovers A fascinating person


  9. says:

    This is one of those books that kills me as a writer It's the true story of Hulme's experiences as a UN worker in the displaced persons camps of German after WWII and it won the Atlantic award for non fiction when it was published It's a fascinating look into a rather untold piece of WWII history well written with lively characters and fantastic places And now it's out of print


  10. says:

    Fascinating description of Wildflecken the displaced person camp where tens of thousands of Poles were placed after World War II by one of the women who ran the camp


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