Free download Mirror Sword and Jewel The Geometry of Japanese Life 108

Mirror Sword and Jewel The Geometry of Japanese Life

Kurt Singer Ê 8 Free download

Akane's Japanese Society Kurt Singer a friend of Keynes and one of his German disciples taught in Japan from 1931 to 1939 This book is the distillation of his experiences and meditations during those hundred months Singer died in 196. Oh man reading this was a chore And I'm pretty sure that Western influence has changed a lot of what the author observed when this was first published in 1973 If you're a student of history maybe this book might be of value to you

review Mirror Sword and Jewel The Geometry of Japanese Life

Panese life which have created the singular character of the country It is seen by many to have a similar stature in presenting and interpreting the 'parameters' of Japanese society as Benedict's The Chrysanthemum and the Sword and N. One should take into account the author is coming from a certain existentialist background he is heavily influenced by both Stefan George and Sigmund Freud and draws from their theories in this book as wellOne can argue the book is a bit dated it has been written in the 1940s after all and Japan changed uite a bit in the later half of the 20th century On the other hand I do think that while both George and Freud might not been right on many things but they were insightful intelligent and even inspiring in their own right So a book based on their influence still is worth a read especially when it is written with such a huge amount of knowledge like the one Singer had at his disposalThe book is the product of living in Japan for many years and having been in touch with Japanese culture for a much longer time Singer has a deep first hand experience of the country and clearly knows what he is writing about better than many other Western authors do and some Japanese as well I might add

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First published over twenty years ago and long out of print this is a uniue interpretation of the essence of Japanese society and individual psychology It explores the mind and soul of the Japanese and points to the hidden laws of Ja. A well written account of the historical origins of Japanese thought and way of life The book captures the paradox of how the Japanese simultaneously embodies undying loyalty but maintains a willingness to adapt principles with changing circumstances This flexibility however seemingly convenient explains the reason why Japanese thought has historically continued for so long The Japanese have appropriated language and religion by opening itself briefly to foreign influences only to close itself and synthesize its own distinct principles and the ways in which it is integrated into daily life The book also notes seminal influences of early women writers before turning over to a patriarchic society I found the comparison between the Chinese and Japanese integration of principles interesting The Chinese value formalism space and symmetry while the Japanese value motion spontaneity and asymmetry Seasons are cyclical for the Chinese whereas time is linear towards decay and birth for the japanese This sentiment affects the aesthetics of Japan throughout their literature painting calligraphy theater crafts architecture religion personality and societal norms In order to really get a sense of the Japanese the author suggests the importance of examining all aspects of the culture rather than pinpointing a singular origin of thoughtA contentious point I am left with is how a Japanese person understands the self Rather than settling matters through logic and rationality and disrupt the harmony of the group the Japanese will uietly internalize any conflict or opinions The heavy influence of Zen Buddhism is attributed to explain ualities of self abnegation and Confucianism in the keeping harmony among the group as foremost importance But how can one take responsibility or hold anyone responsible if the self is extinguished in daily life Isn't this a way of shirking responsibility This stems from my frustration with the inefficiencies of the government banks and corporations the iron triangle This issue is now much important because of the flood of western thought and ideals Japan is now in a vastly different context which the author acknowledges where the stresses and definition of the Self have altered especially post WWII I enjoyed the author's breadth of knowledge of other cultures where it is often brought into light when examining the similarities and differences of Japanese culture Singer follows the formation of the japanese culture by studying how the country both integrated and denied certain aspects of foreign influences For example the author compares the Japanese to Roman ideas of maintaining order through brotherhood and localized smaller sects of governing as opposed to the Greek's lucid logic of universal justice Singer also contrasts the western Christian influenced ideal of salvation and the attainment of the divine found in the external with the zen Buddhist teachings of finding enlightenment within the self a coming home and a journey towards a centerThis book is particularly interesting because it is written from Singer's 100 month stay in Japan as a professor in the 30's—a rare foreign pre WWII perspective to be writing from


4 thoughts on “Mirror Sword and Jewel The Geometry of Japanese Life

  1. says:

    A well written account of the historical origins of Japanese thought and way of life The book captures the paradox of how the Japanese simultaneously embodies undying loyalty but maintains a willingness to adapt principles with changing circumstances This flexibility however seemingly convenient explains the reason why Japanese thought has historically continued for so long The Japanese have appropriated language and religion by opening itself briefly to foreign influences only to close itself and synthesize its own distinct principles and the ways in which it is integrated into daily life The book also notes seminal influences of early women writers before turning over to a patriarchic society I found the comparison between the Chinese and Japanese integration of principles interesting The Chinese value formalism space and symmetry while the Japanese value motion spontaneity and asymmetry Seasons are cyclical for the Chinese whereas time is linear towards decay and birth for the japanese This sentiment affects the aesthetics of Japan throughout their literature painting calligraphy theater crafts architecture religion personality and societal norms In order to really get a sense of the Japanese the author suggests the importance of examining all aspects of the culture rather than pinpointing a singular origin of thoughtA contentious point I am left with is how a Japanese person understands the self Rather than settling matters through logic and rationality and disrupt the harmony of the group the Japanese will uietly internalize any conflict or opinions The heavy influence of Zen Buddhism is attributed to explain ualities of self abnegation and Confucianism in the keeping harmony among the group as foremost importance But how can one take responsibility or hold anyone responsible if the self is extinguished in daily life? Isn't this a way of shirking responsibility? This stems from my frustration with the inefficiencies of the government banks and corporations the iron triangle This issue is now much important because of the flood of western thought and ideals Japan is now in a vastly different context which the author acknowledges where the stresses and definition of the Self have altered especially post WWII I enjoyed the author's breadth of knowledge of other cultures where it is often brought into light when examining the similarities and differences of Japanese culture Singer follows the formation of the japanese culture by studying how the country both integrated and denied certain aspects of foreign influences For example the author compares the Japanese to Roman ideas of maintaining order through brotherhood and localized smaller sects of governing as opposed to the Greek's lucid logic of universal justice Singer also contrasts the western Christian influenced ideal of salvation and the attainment of the divine found in the external with the zen Buddhist teachings of finding enlightenment within the self a coming home and a journey towards a centerThis book is particularly interesting because it is written from Singer's 100 month stay in Japan as a professor in the 30's—a rare foreign pre WWII perspective to be writing from


  2. says:

    One should take into account the author is coming from a certain existentialist background he is heavily influenced by both Stefan George and Sigmund Freud and draws from their theories in this book as wellOne can argue the book is a bit dated it has been written in the 1940s after all and Japan changed uite a bit in the later half of the 20th century On the other hand I do think that while both George and Freud might not been right on many things but they were insightful intelligent and even inspiring in their own right So a book based on their influence still is worth a read especially when it is written with such a huge amount of knowledge like the one Singer had at his disposalThe book is the product of living in Japan for many years and having been in touch with Japanese culture for a much longer time Singer has a deep first hand experience of the country and clearly knows what he is writing about better than many other Western authors do and some Japanese as well I might add


  3. says:

    Oh man reading this was a chore And I'm pretty sure that Western influence has changed a lot of what the author observed when this was first published in 1973 If you're a student of history maybe this book might be of value to you


  4. says:

    This book shows its age Despite Singer's residence in Japan I find it problematic that a book purporting to be on so many different aspects of Japanese society history spiritality etcetera could be written without use of Japanese language source material This book is probably better classified as a sort of memoir rather than tell me much about Japan I feel it tells me about how Singer saw Japan and the Japanese people


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