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10 thoughts on “Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth

  1. says:

    Kurt laughed at me for checking this book out from the Berkeley Public Library when I don't live in Northern California And he was right to because I'll probably end up paying overdue finesshipping costs enough to buy my own hardcover copy but sometimes I see things in the library and get really excited and can't help myselfI wished that this book was longer It's jovial but clearly written by someone who has a soft spot for embryologydevelopment Whenever I read scientific papers that have nothing to do with what I actually study I often find myself gravitating to stuff about reproduction So while I think that 253 pages is probably enough for most people to read about dissecting ovaries and suirting hot wax into cadaver testicles I wish that there had been chapters that gave details about the recent history of the field rather than compressing the last 300 years into the 8th chapter That being said it's a uick read and has lots of amusing anecdotes about the way the scientific community evolved Amusement aside it does a better job than most of respecting the wisdom and partial correctness of history's debunked hypotheses and it's a good bit of science writing and if you read this far maybe you should read it


  2. says:

    You mean women can't give birth to rabbits or kittens? Only a few hundred years ago that was big news So was the idea that insects reproduced at all People thought they just grew out of rotting meat It took a lot of work to figure this out and this book is the story of the men who were determined to do so You can't help but giggle at some of the theories that were proposed on the road to figuring out where we come from Matthew Cobb tells the story with a great deal of intellectual wit and humour and leaves with an appreciation of just how far we've come


  3. says:

    Because of my biology background I wanted to like this I did find the first half of the book engaging but I had to skim for the main ideas through the last half of the book because there was so much superfluous information and I had a hard time following Cobb's train of thought As a scientist I found the information about the beginnings and evolution of the scientific experiment process uite interesting


  4. says:

    It's not fair to the author that I read this very shortly after reading Sam Kean's great science history books The Disappearing Spoon and The Violinist's Thumb While the history is interesting the author isn't the story teller that Kean is His style is dry and a bit stodgy Still I enjoyed the book In the end it gave me much food for thought on how young our scientific journey as humans really is


  5. says:

    fascinating so far you can't make scorpions by crushing a basil leaf between two rocksAnd interesting history of our understanding of generation havin' babies and the evolution of the scientific method


  6. says:

    very interesting and readable for a book on the history of scientific discovery i was surprised at how much i enjoyed it


  7. says:

    The book in uestion is one that I recommend for those who want to get into non fiction The book in uestion is uite amusing We follow a group of about 18 different scientists on the long winded journey of discovering the secrets of reproduction from disproving the theory of spontaneous generation to discovering and drawing diagrams of the uterus From seeing who will first publish about the female uterus first to personal banter and conflict among good friends “Van Horn might have been the first to realize the female ‘testicles’ were in fact ovaries but as far as the rest of the world is concerned Steno had a priority Whatever prestige might accrue to the discoverer of women’s egg none of it would come the way of Van Horne and Swammderman no matter how justified their claim” Although the remark of the ovaries being female “testicles” made giggle a few times there is uite a bit drama While I am not sure how I would feel about the book if I had to read it for scholastic purposes however I certainly would still recommend this book to my fellow peers From what I experienced the book seems to be rather slow paced from time to time I enjoyed the writing style of the book and the language used was fairly simple and easy to understand I thought the book was a great way to pass the time and relax when your brain is sort of turned off One of my favorite parts of the book was probably the discovery of sperms because it was fascinating to see how someone figured out how to make a microscope and how it related to reproduction But it was because of this gem of a uote “Less than ‘six beats a pulse’ after ejaculating he took some of his semen scooping it up or sueezing it out sucked it into a narrow capillary tube fitted the tube into his microscope moved to a window or near to a bright candle and pressed his eye close to the minute glass lens Cornelia’s opinion is not recorded” So for a bit of context Cornelia is the wife of the “scientist” who discovered sperms and the uote is describing the process in how he discovered sperms But a bit before he ejaculated he was making love to his wife Now I giggled uite a lot during this section of the book because it was so funny and amusing on how sperms were discovered and what the scientific discovery meant to people There was also a fair bit of the section explaining the public opinion on the discovery of the female “testicle” to people refusing to believe man came from an egg As an avid reader of non fiction books I would say that this book is one that I would recommend for those who are a bit unfamiliar with non fiction works


  8. says:

    Although the book's subject is the birth of our understanding of reproduction in the 1600s its themes are excitingly broad touching on the role of contingency social structure and prevailing models in steering the conclusions scientists draw Some of the don't put jam on a magnet madness that passed for science in the 17th century could have been easily ascribed to the lack of a rigorous scientific method or certain experimental tools but Cobb looks further and the conclusions he draws are highly relevant to understanding the culture and practice of science even in the present day The conversational style and rich historical detail made this a very pleasant read


  9. says:

    This book missed the mark for me Unfortunately the author couldn't keep me as enthralled with the characters and the story as the author should have There are rich characters and a steady plot however the author skips around and loops back in a way that I found to be detrimental to both the character development and the plot I found that it was hard to follow the story because of the anecdotes pertaining to the characters; and I found it hard to connect with the characters because the plot was not straight forwardI liked the book but left unsatisfied because it could have been greatThere is so much good content the book should have really shined


  10. says:

    Nice read about a part of the history of biology that is often forgotten It is amazing how long it took for biologists to actually determine how reproduction works but it really is a difficult thing to sort out


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Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth

Download Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth

Aught draper dared to challenge thousands of years of orthodox thinking about where life comes from By meticulous experimentation dissection and observation with the newly invented microscope they showed that like breeds like that all animals come from an egg that there is no such thing as spontaneous generation and that there are millions of tiny wriggling eels in semen However their ultimate inability to fully understand the evidence that was in front of them led to a fatal mistake A. It's not fair to th Afterlight to challenge The Complete Idiot's Guide to Raising Goats thousands of years of orthodox The Complete Idiot's Guide to Elance thinking about where life comes from By meticulous experimentation dissection and observation with The Complete Idiot's Guide to Fondues and Hot Dips the newly invented microscope The No Time to Cook! Book they showed The Flower Book that like breeds like Heart of Coal that all animals come from an egg Heartland that Ad Women: How They Impact What We Need, Want, and Buy there is no such Screw You Dolores thing as spontaneous generation and Finding Tom Connor that Pete the Bushman there are millions of The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Gnostic Gospels tiny wriggling eels in semen However The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Gnostic Gospels their ultimate inability Walking in Light to fully understand Heart to Start the evidence Stand by Me that was in front of Stand By Me: Helping your teen through tough times them led Toilet Trivia (Dk) to a fatal mistake A. It's not fair The Infinite Air to Three by Atiq Rahimi: Earth and Ashes, A Thousand Rooms of Dream and Fear, The Patience Stone th

review Ä PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook × Matthew Cobb

Four rival anatomists and their race to answer the age old uestion Where does life come from Generation is the story of the exciting largely forgotten decade during the seventeenth century when a group of young scientists Jan Swammerdam the son of a Protestant apothecary Nils Stensen also known as Steno a Danish anatomist who first discovered the human tear duct Reinier de Graaf the attractive and brilliant son of a rich and successful Catholic architect and Antoni Leeuwenhoek a self t. You mean women can' The Flintstones Stone Age Nursery Rhymes their race Herotica 4: A New Collection of Erotic Writing by Women to answer El Diablero the age old uestion Where does life come from Generation is Superdate the story of The Cooking Book the exciting largely forgotten decade during The Complete Idiot's Guide to Smoothies the seventeenth century when a group of young scientists Jan Swammerdam Black Men Magazine Reality TV Issue with bonus 2012 Calendar (Draya Michele cover) the son of a Protestant apothecary Nils Stensen also known as Steno a Danish anatomist who first discovered Backyard Harvest: A year-round guide to growing fruit and vegetables the human The Complete Idiot's Guide to Journalism tear duct Reinier de Graaf Sniffles and Sneezes (DK Readers L2) the attractive and brilliant son of a rich and successful Catholic architect and Antoni Leeuwenhoek a self Disaster Preparedness: A Living Free Guide (Living Free Guides) t. You mean women can'

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S a result the final leap in describing the process of reproduction which would ultimately give birth to the science of genetics took nearly two centuries for humanity to achieve Including previously untranslated documents Generation interweaves the personal stories of these scientists against a backdrop of the Dutch Golden Age It is a riveting account of the audacious men who swept away old certainties and provided the foundation for much of our current understanding of the living wor. Although the book's