FREE READ ↠ Life Ascending The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution



10 thoughts on “Life Ascending The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution

  1. says:

    I had a lot of fun reading this book up until the end when I started to worry about the author's propensity towards exaggeration and speculationFor anyone who wants to learn about cutting edge speculation on the origin of life Eukaryotas and sex it's definitely worth a readAnyone allergic to new age nonsense sociology just skip the last 9th chapterEveryone should take the last chapter with a very large grain of salt because it's full of speculation overblown claims and other lies1 The Origin of LifeThe author is obsessed with hydrothermal ventsThe evidence for life's origin in hydrothermal vents is overstated as fact despite its true status as a highly speculative theory2 DNAI was astounded to learn that the evolution of the genetic code which RNA seuences code for which amino acids arose only oncebut the machinery for DNA replication arose twice independently Once in the archaea and once for all the othersThough the crucial evidence in the argument is the interpenetration of the DNA replication genes as a molecular clockThe author carefully hides the error margin for this method of dating which approaches unity when applied to organisms capable of lateral genetic exchangeStill it is curious that the whole machinery of DNA replication seems to follow two reportedly distinct paradigms3 PhotosynthesisThe textbook story of photosynthesis is exposed as a gross over simplificationA detailed but again speculative re telling is a neat story of long lost cousins exchanging DNANot as incestuous as it sounds 4 The complex cellLike photosynthesis the story ends up being uite involved compared to the high school biology explanationTo me the most interesting insight is the theorized reason for a cell nucleus to provide a barrier to transposonsThe porous nuclear acts as a speed bump allowing time for transposons to be broken down before traveling out to the mitochondriaCool stuff5 SexWhat is it good for?This chapter was pretty hot but nothing I didn't learn in High SchoolGet your mind out of the gutter I was talking about AP Biology6 MovementLots of talk about muscles and as usual some neat surprises7 SightYes I'd rather half an eye than no eye at allBrine shrimp come to the rescue as a supreme example in support of evolution8 Hot BloodWere the dinosaurs hot blooded?What makes hot vs cold blood?The answers may bore youI'm half joking because this chapter was full of interesting theories tooBut I could care less for paleontological bickering9 ConsciousnessThis chapter is full of half baked and worse philosophy on top of misunderstandings on basic lessons from physicsFor example we don't even know why matter exists rather than nothing at allThis is an atrocious misunderstanding of physicsSee A Universe from Nothing by Lawrence KraussThe most frightening digression in this chapter was the authors claim that panpsychism is taken seriously againHe touts Graham Cairns Smith's bomb in the basement dualist argument Boo HissYes this chapter in a modern biology book contains a serious claim of DUALISMThe orgy of ignorance continues as the author asserts we don't even understand how uantum mechanics worksHe goes on to claim that uantum physics leaves room for free will and a soulIt's a good thing I listened to the formless audiobook or I'd have had a bonfire right then and thereBut I had the misfortune to be in the middle of my commute to work so I kept readingI tried to find my happy place during some talk of consciousness as uantum vibrationsThen I wept aloud at the mention of a particle source of feelings which might be discovered in the particle acceleratorsObviously the wiring and behavior of the brain's neural network is the source of mind and feelingsNick Lane should stick to biology he hasn't the background to discuss physics10 DeathFollowing the chapter on consciousness I had little patience leftThis chapter is about how death works and how we can overcome itThe author seems pretty set in his Ray Kurzweil like denial of the inevitability of deathIt is claimed multiple times that death is simple and can be prevented biochemicallyThe chapter focuses chiefly on the hype surrounding the TOR geneIt's really not worth reading unless you're a fan of popular ie mythological pharmacologyThere is some interesting theorizing as to the evolutionary cause of aging and deathStrangely there is NO MENTION of the primary cause of aging telomere shorteningThe primary defense against cancer our body uses is a fixed number of cellular replicationsThis ensures that unless or until malignancy is achieved tumors eventually stop growingThe replication limit on stem cells produces a finite lifetime to enjoy tissue repairIt seems obvious to me that reduced uality and speed of tissue repair and replacement amount to the symptoms of agingNick Lane either has never heard of telomeres or has chosen to deceive the reader by leaving them out


  2. says:

    Excellent pop science writing as absorbing as a novel I read it in two days The author has a knack for compelling narrative flow that seems both natural and accumulating to some sense of Getting Somewhere by the end always very satisfyingLots of new things from recent and less recent research that I hadn't yet heard about which was much of what I was hoping for from this book It also gives in passing along the way a good sense of how science itself evolves Wow has biology ever advanced since I was in college I credit the computer even than the new scanning techs Mass DNA crunching with all the new data it is revealing would be impossible without itOne kudo deducted for describing Watson and Crick without giving credit by name to Rosalind Franklin which would only have taken a clause Half a clause and a few pilfered X ray diffraction photos and a few X ray diffraction photos pilfered from Rosalind Franklin would have done just that little bit towards righting an old wrong I had been rather hoping Lane would do for photosynthesis the sort of lucid and detailed explanation he'd done for mitochondria in his prior title but since it only had a chapter and not a whole volume we only got as far as lucid He did offer a book rec for further reading on the topic Eating the Sun which ha my county library has and therefore so will I shortly so that's promisingHighly recommended for general readersTa L


  3. says:

    What were the ten greatest inventions of evolution? According to Nick Lane author of Life Ascending they were the Origin of Life itself DNA Photosynthesis The Complex Cell Sex Movement Sight Hot Blood Consciousness and Death It’s a pretty good list I thought about it and could not come up with any substitutionsThe origins of life are arguably not evolutionary science at all but a separate field called abiogenesis Nevertheless this book’s chapter on how life started is one of its best making a good argument that life may have begun in the deep ocean not in the well known “hot smoker” vents but in cooler longer lived alkaline hydrothermal vents which precipitate a form of rock that is riddled with tiny pockets about the size of a cell that could have served to concentrate and protect the chemical precursors necessary to light the spark of life When all the components were ready it probably happened uicklyif any reaction takes a millennium to complete then the chances are that all the reactants will simply dissipate or break down in the meantime unless they are continually replenished by other faster reactions The origin of life was certainly a matter of chemistry so the same logic applies the basic reactions of life must have taken place spontaneously and uicklyTo say that life “happened” reuires some further clarification The chemical processes necessary to create a living cell may have occurred many times given the similarities of the environment that birthed them but to truly be life the organism also needed a way to survive and reproduce and it was that bit of chemistry that set life in motion “It is certainly true that natural selection can’t work without some sort of replicator; and it is eually true that life can only evolve complexity through the auspices of natural selection For many molecular biologists then the origin of life is the origin of replication”From the origin of life the book moves on to DNA and the author has provided a number of examples to help the reader understandEach DNA letter is copied with a precision bordering on the miraculous recreating the order of the original with an error rate of about one letter in 1000 million In comparison for a scribe to work with a similar precision he would need to copy out the entire bible 280 times before making a single error In fact the scribes’ success was a lot lower There are said to be 24000 surviving manuscript copies of the New Testament and no two copies are identicalNevertheless even with the astonishing fidelity of DNA replication errors appear among each cell’s three billion base pairs in the human genome when it dividesEach time a human cell divides you’d expect to see about three mutations per set of chromosomes And the times that a cell divides the such mutations accumulate ultimately contributing to diseases like cancer Mutations also cross generations If a fertilised egg develops as a female embryo it takes about thirty rounds of cell division to form a new egg cell; and each round adds a few mutations Men are even worse a hundred rounds of cell division are needed to make sperm with each round linked inexorably to mutations Because sperm production goes on throughout life round after round of cell division the older the man the worse it getsExtrapolating from this we see that “even an average child of youthful parents has around 200 new mutations compared with their parents although only a handful of these may be directly harmful”The idea of copying errors can be extended further to add insight into the evolution of speciesAssuming that humans split off from our common ancestor with chimps around 6 million years ago and accumulated mutations at the rate of 200 per generation ever since we’ve still only had time to modify about 1 per cent of our genome in the time available As chimps have been evolving at a similar rate theoretically we should expect to see a 2 per cent difference In fact the difference is a little less than that; in terms of DNA seuence chimps and humans are around 986 per cent identicalThe book then moves into photosynthesis the foundation for the evolution of complex life everywhere “All our energy is a beam of sunlight set free from its captive state in food” Since photosynthesis is often held up by creationists as an example of special creation as in “what good is half an eye or half a wing?” the book has a good description of the steps involved examining them at the level of chemistry and physics to explain how energy is stored and released and how even the precursor reactions to full blown photosynthesis would have been beneficial The end state is marvelously complex but also an incredibly inefficient Rube Goldberg contraption that wastes about 96% of the potential energy – in other words it is exactly the type of process evolution would evolve since it cannot be forward looking and can only work with what it has at the present moment preserving the changes that work and discarding those that do notLike life itself complex eukaryotic cells seem to have emerged from a chance encounter “The eukaryotic cell only evolved once because the union of two prokaryotes in which one gains entry to another is truly a rare event a genuinely fateful encounter All that we hold dear in this life all the marvels of our world stem from a single event that embodied both chance and necessity” The author examines several theories for its appearance and settles on one that posits an accidental combination of two primitive cells “the eukaryotic cell did not evolve in a standard ‘Darwinian’ way but rather by some sort of mammoth gene fusion From a genetic point of view the first eukaryote was a chimera–half archaea half bacteria” In this scenario each of the key cellular organelles such as the nucleus the cell wall and mitochondria were pulled into the cell and established themselves without being consumed; once established they created a symbiotic relationship among themselves to become the vastly efficient modern eukaryotic cellThe chapter on sex starts the reader down a rabbit hole of speculation that it is an absurdly expensive and uestionable process that should never have evolved in the first place “Most of us sense that the magic of sex as a form of reproduction lies in exactly this ability to generate variation to pull a uniue being from a hat every time But when scrutinised with the care of a mathematical geneticist it is far from obvious that variety for variety’s sake is a good thing Why break up a winning combination; why not just clone it?”The argument that sex improves species because each new offspring is a new roll of the genetic dice is also shown to be weak “sex in itself doesn’t introduce any new variation to a population Without mutation sex merely shuffles existing genes around removing the bad ones as it goes thereby ultimately restricting variation”So what is it good for? The author argues that it is essential to stay one step ahead of parasites “Sex helps because parasites evolve rapidly they have short lifespans and heaving populations It doesn’t take them long to adapt to their host at the most intimate molecular scale–protein to protein gene to gene Failure to do so costs them their life; success gives them the freedom to grow and replicate”The next three chapters are on Movement Sight and Hot Blood All are interesting particularly in the examples the author provides to expand upon his arguments but most readers already familiar with evolution will not find any great insights in themThe book ends with chapters on Consciousness and on Death which for us thinking beings are inextricably linked “The mind is conscious only when it becomes aware that it is conscious when the penny drops” Once we think about it we realize that life is a trap with no way out “Adjust the ‘death’ settings to make cell death less likely and the outcome is cancerous unstoppable growth But make cell death too likely and the outcome is a withering away Cancer and degeneration are two sides of the same coin both undermine multicellular life”Anyone familiar with evolution knows that it is “concerned” – an overly anthropomorphic term – only with passing along genes which means improving survival chances so that organisms can reach reproductive age Once past the age of reproduction evolution is powerless to further enhance survival fitness because there is no way to pass along any beneficial traits The author uses a good example to explain thisthere is a statistical likelihood of death regardless of ageing–of being hit by a bus or a stone falling from the sky or being eaten by a tiger or consumed by disease Even if you are immortal you are unlikely to live forever Individuals who concentrate their reproductive resources in the earlier part of their life are therefore statistically likely to have offspring than individuals who count on an unhurried schedule reproducing say once every 500 years or so and regrettably losing their head after only 450 Cram in sex earlier on and you’ll probably leave behind offspring who inherit your ‘sex early’ genesWe humans are not built to last; for each life we owe a death We can tweak the system making minor adjustments to the average life span but in the end we were not built for long lives Errors creep into our DNA replication which are themselves repeated with further errors Eventually the mechanism jams the critical systems that ensure programmed cell death fail and cancer carries us away If not cancer some other vital cellular management function breaks down and does us in Long lives or short we can only try to make the most of life for as long as we have it Marcus Aurelius emperor and stoic would simply shrug his shoulders and say that we should care about the things that are within our power to affect and not worry about what we cannot changeI enjoyed this book It is well written for readers with a general interest in evolution; the chemistry and physics are kept to a minimum and explained using simple examples I learned a number of things from it and it helped point me toward new areas of evolutionary study that I want to explore


  4. says:

    An excellent book that really delves into the biochemical reasons for things being as they are in nature From the origin of life in alkaline vents surrounded by sea water creating organic compounds to the evolutionary reasoning behind the existence of death itself originating from the process of apoptosis cellular suicide in bacterial prehistory to curb bacteriophage infections This book is an excellent introduction into the chemistry of life and the various major fields of study where research has been undertaken to explain the origin of biological features we all take for granted If you pick this book up heads up some sections of the book may seem overtly technical when they begin but if you continue on the argument will be very clear soon enough The author ensures that the reader untrained in biochemistry would retain the core argument before utilising it to explain something far reaching or salient that deeply pertains to life as we know it Highly recommended


  5. says:

    This was one of the best books I have ever had the pleasure to read If you like a book that delves deep into every tiny detail this is the book for you If things like ATP leaky mitochondria bacteria that can live in strange conditions how DNA was discovered and how Crick thought aliens put it on Earth you will enjoy Lane's wonderful adventure of how life came to be The science in this book was outstanding


  6. says:

    I found this to be a mixed bag I found some chapters such as Complex Cells and Hot Blood fascinating and others such as Movement and Consciousness uite tedious The author does a good job of reducing complex biological processes into simpler terms but I felt he used weird analogies far too often to illustrate his point When he started comparing muscle proteins into classical music I had to roll my eyes In addition a few illustrations would be useful to show some conceptsIt was nice to catch up on recent discoveries and see how much the science has progressed since I last studied biology which was in high school and first year university fifteen years ago


  7. says:

    view spoiler Bettie's Books hide spoiler


  8. says:

    Nick Lane is a self described evolutionary biochemist and presently Senior Lecturer in the Research Department of Genetics Evolution and Environment at University College London His Life Ascending The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution was awarded the 2010 Royal Society Prize for Science Books He has previously published Oxygen The Molecule that Made the World and Power Sex Suicide Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life His What is Living? Why Energy Drives the Origin and Evolution of Life is expected in 2014In Life Ascending The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution Lane focuses on the inventing rather than the inventions the origination the birth of the thing rather than its life And biological understanding being what it is this leads him from the very beginning The Origin of Life to the search for precursors The subseuent deployment operation and implications of the enumerated “inventions” though not entirely ignored are not really the purview here For exampleIf the railroad happened to be one of Lane’s “Ten Great Inventions of Evolution” there would be much about ancient Greek wheel rut roads including those in Sicily and Cyrenica noting their consistent depth of 7 to 15 centimeters their rut width of 20 to 22 centimeters and gauge of 138 to144 centimeters Mention would be made of rut sidings allowing vehicles to pass where only a single rut is available These Greek rut roads might be compared with those cut into Vespasian’s tunnel at Bons in that segment of the Via Flamina known as Petra Pertusa where the gauges ranged from 110 to 165 centimetersFurther extended discussion would be had of Greek cartage and the sometimes unclear distinction between the hamaxa and the hamaxa tetrakulos – two and four wheeled carts – this in the context of the inappropriateness of the hamaxa tetrakulos for travel on wheel rut roads unless of course they possessed a swiveling front axle Which in turn would lead to a discussion of the development of the bogie or turning train the mechanism by which through first attaching the front wheels of a cart or wagon to its shaft and only then to the chassis by way of a pivot the front wheels of a four wheeled vehicle may turn independently – and how this though used by the Celts before the Common Era only came into fuller use in the Middle Ages perhaps encouraged by the needs of steerable four wheeled battering rams propelled from the rearEventually we would come to a discussion of mining technology and mining trucks running on wooden rails in the middle of the European millennium and then even eventually to metal clad wood rails then to iron and steel then the history of steam engines with emphasis on the Greek aeopile etc etcWhat we would not get from Lane however would be a discussion of the economic and political imperatives which drove in fairly short order the spanning of the terrestrial planet with a network of rail lines Nor would we likely find much consideration of the resultant transformation of world’s social economic and political culture not to mention the matériel of its industrial base from fossil fuels to forestry to metallurgy or of the railroad’s relation to the various imperialist projects on all the world’s inhabited continents or to the great European wars of the 20th century or even to the telegraph though we might have an amusing aside on Railroad Time and the institution of time zonesAnd we fairly certainly would not find any mention of the various other technical and social transformations which occurred in partial causal tandem with railroad development like the iron and steel transformation of the advanced metropolitan urban environment and most certainly nothing of rail’s still shifting relation to a subseuent high speed pavement based internal combustion culture or to air traffic and air freight for that matter etc Of course even a 28 page essay the average length of those in Life Ascending on the invention of the railroad if that invention were indeed to be offered as one of the 10 most pivotal in the course of human history would have to have its limits One makes choices I only offer the preceding to illustrate the sort of choices Life Ascending makesThat essential frustration aside and admittedly other smaller and perhaps related complaints – though I cannot help but note here Lane’s consistent propensity to flog his own favorite contemporary evolutionary speculations while only vaguely ualifying their standing relative to the current consensus I found the volume a useful hint at an early 21st century biochemical perspective Dr Lane is a biochemist; I have not even the faintest grasp of the fact of the three? four? five? 103? 118? a possible 155? elements He’s got me thinking about the phase problem in x ray particularly protein crystallography and transposons I’ll grant him that


  9. says:

    A well written description of the in the authors opinion ten greatest inventions of evolutionThese includethe origin of life itself DNA photosynthesis the eukaryotes sex movement sight warm bloodedness homeothermy consciousness and deathThe author is a biochemist and his analysis is very chemical oriented but still very readable for a layperson He explains various techniues for discovering the information in a way I could understandI admit that in some places I lost him but overall the read is interesting and educational“Men are even worse a hundred rounds of cell division are needed to make sperm with each round linked inexorably to mutations Because sperm production goes on throughout life round after round of cell division the older the man the worse it gets As the geneticist James Crow put it the greatest mutational health hazard in the population is fertile old men” “Life itself turned our planet blue and green as tiny photosynthetic bacteria cleansed the oceans of air and sea and filled them with oxygen Powered by this new and potent source of energy life erupted Flowers bloom and beckon intricate corals hide darting gold fish vast monsters lurk in black depths trees reach for the sky animals buzz and lumber and see And in the midst of it all we are moved by the untold mysteries of this creation we cosmic assemblies of molecules that feel and think and marvel and wonder at how we came to be here”


  10. says:

    Before reading Nick Lane I have never had interest in Biology I didn't even watch Animal Planet And for a month now I can't stop talking about mitochondria DNA evolution etcHis books are fascinating I like the way he structures his statements his sense of humor the analogies he makes the notions that start floating in your head I like that he obviously likes The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Somebody here has said that he is speculating too much with unproved theories May be because I'm not a scientist but I don't mind I think that he is giving a fair warning every time he is speculating about something


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Life Ascending The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution

FREE DOWNLOAD Life Ascending The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution

A renowned biochemist draws on cutting edge scientific findings to construct the mosaic of life’s astounding historyHow did life invent itself Where did DNA come from How did consciousness develop Powerful new research methods are providing vivid insights into the makeup of life Comparing gene seuences examining atomic structures of proteins and looking into. I had a lot of fun reading this book up until the end when I started to worry about the author's propensity towards exaggeration and speculationFor anyone who wants to learn about cutting edge speculation on the origin of life Eukaryotas and sex it's definitely worth a readAnyone allergic to new age nonsense sociology just skip the last 9th chapterEveryone should take the last chapter with a very large grain of salt because it's full of speculation overblown claims and other lies1 The Origin of LifeThe author is obsessed with hydrothermal ventsThe evidence for life's origin in hydrothermal vents is overstated as fact despite its true status as a highly speculative theory2 DNAI was astounded to learn that the evolution of the genetic code which RNA seuences code for which amino acids arose only oncebut the machinery for DNA replication arose twice independently Once in the archaea and once for all the othersThough the crucial evidence in the argument is the interpenetration of the DNA replication genes as a molecular clockThe author carefully hides the error margin for this method of dating which approaches unity when applied to organisms capable of lateral genetic exchangeStill it is curious that the whole machinery of DNA replication seems to follow two reportedly distinct paradigms3 PhotosynthesisThe textbook story of photosynthesis is exposed as a gross over simplificationA detailed but again speculative re telling is a neat story of long lost cousins exchanging DNANot as incestuous as it sounds 4 The complex cellLike photosynthesis the story ends up being uite involved compared to the high school biology explanationTo me the most interesting insight is the theorized reason for a cell nucleus to provide a barrier to transposonsThe porous nuclear acts as a speed bump allowing time for transposons to be broken down before traveling out to the mitochondriaCool stuff5 SexWhat is it good forThis chapter was pretty hot but nothing I didn't learn in High SchoolGet your mind out of the gutter I was talking about AP Biology6 MovementLots of talk about muscles and as usual some neat surprises7 SightYes I'd rather half an eye than no eye at allBrine shrimp come to the rescue as a supreme example in support of evolution8 Hot BloodWere the dinosaurs hot bloodedWhat makes hot vs cold bloodThe answers may bore youI'm half joking because this chapter was full of interesting theories tooBut I could care less for paleontological bickering9 ConsciousnessThis chapter is full of half baked and worse philosophy on top of misunderstandings on basic lessons from physicsFor example we don't even know why matter exists rather than nothing at allThis is an atrocious misunderstanding of physicsSee A Universe from Nothing by Lawrence KraussThe most frightening digression in this chapter was the authors claim that panpsychism is taken seriously againHe touts Graham Cairns Smith's bomb in the basement dualist argument Boo HissYes this chapter in a modern biology book contains a serious claim of DUALISMThe orgy of ignorance continues as the author asserts we don't even understand how uantum mechanics worksHe goes on to claim that uantum physics leaves room for free will and a soulIt's a good thing I listened to the formless audiobook or I'd have had a bonfire right then and thereBut I had the misfortune to be in the middle of my commute to work so I kept readingI tried to find my happy place during some talk of consciousness as uantum vibrationsThen I wept aloud at the mention of a particle source of feelings which might be discovered in the particle acceleratorsObviously the wiring and behavior of the brain's neural network is the source of mind and feelingsNick Lane should stick to biology he hasn't the background to discuss physics10 DeathFollowing the chapter on consciousness I had little patience leftThis chapter is about how death works and how we can overcome itThe author seems pretty set in his Ray Kurzweil like denial of the inevitability of deathIt is claimed multiple times that death is simple and can be prevented biochemicallyThe chapter focuses chiefly on the hype surrounding the TOR geneIt's really not worth reading unless you're a fan of popular ie mythological pharmacologyThere is some interesting theorizing as to the evolutionary cause of aging and deathStrangely there is NO MENTION of the primary cause of aging telomere shorteningThe primary defense against cancer our body uses is a fixed number of cellular replicationsThis ensures that unless or until malignancy is achieved tumors eventually stop growingThe replication limit on stem cells produces a finite lifetime to enjoy tissue repairIt seems obvious to me that reduced uality and speed of tissue repair and replacement amount to the symptoms of agingNick Lane either has never heard of telomeres or has chosen to deceive the reader by leaving them out Monteverdi's Tonal Language providing vivid insights into the makeup of life Comparing gene seuences examining atomic structures of A Guide for Murdered Children proteins and looking into. I had a lot of fun reading this book up until the end when I started to worry about the author's Hermit in Paris: Autobiographical Writings propensity towards exaggeration and speculationFor anyone who wants to learn about cutting edge speculation on the origin of life Eukaryotas and sex it's definitely worth a readAnyone allergic to new age nonsense sociology just skip the last 9th chapterEveryone should take the last chapter with a very large grain of salt because it's full of speculation overblown claims and other lies1 The Origin of LifeThe author is obsessed with hydrothermal ventsThe evidence for life's origin in hydrothermal vents is overstated as fact despite its true status as a highly speculative theory2 DNAI was astounded to learn that the evolution of the genetic code which RNA seuences code for which amino acids arose only oncebut the machinery for DNA replication arose twice independently Once in the archaea and once for all the othersThough the crucial evidence in the argument is the interpenetration of the DNA replication genes as a molecular clockThe author carefully hides the error margin for this method of dating which approaches unity when applied to organisms capable of lateral genetic exchangeStill it is curious that the whole machinery of DNA replication seems to follow two reportedly distinct A Gallagher Wedding paradigms3 PhotosynthesisThe textbook story of Lust Bites photosynthesis is exposed as a gross over simplificationA detailed but again speculative re telling is a neat story of long lost cousins exchanging DNANot as incestuous as it sounds 4 The complex cellLike Olivia photosynthesis the story ends up being uite involved compared to the high school biology explanationTo me the most interesting insight is the theorized reason for a cell nucleus to Wanted provide a barrier to transposonsThe Illuminate: Ignite Change Through Speeches, Stories, Ceremonies and Symbols porous nuclear acts as a speed bump allowing time for transposons to be broken down before traveling out to the mitochondriaCool stuff5 SexWhat is it good forThis chapter was Where the Red Fern Grows pretty hot but nothing I didn't learn in High SchoolGet your mind out of the gutter I was talking about AP Biology6 MovementLots of talk about muscles and as usual some neat surprises7 SightYes I'd rather half an eye than no eye at allBrine shrimp come to the rescue as a supreme example in support of evolution8 Hot BloodWere the dinosaurs hot bloodedWhat makes hot vs cold bloodThe answers may bore youI'm half joking because this chapter was full of interesting theories tooBut I could care less for Timeless Moon paleontological bickering9 ConsciousnessThis chapter is full of half baked and worse On Photography philosophy on top of misunderstandings on basic lessons from Time Management: Effortless Time Management: Your Effortless Guide To Get Things Done In A Less Time, Boost Productivity and Enjoy Your Personal Life More ... - Productivity hacks - Stop Procastination) physicsFor example we don't even know why matter exists rather than nothing at allThis is an atrocious misunderstanding of Journey into Darkness physicsSee A Universe from Nothing by Lawrence KraussThe most frightening digression in this chapter was the authors claim that Entertaining Mr Stone panpsychism is taken seriously againHe touts Graham Cairns Smith's bomb in the basement dualist argument Boo HissYes this chapter in a modern biology book contains a serious claim of DUALISMThe orgy of ignorance continues as the author asserts we don't even understand how uantum mechanics worksHe goes on to claim that uantum Britain's War Machine physics leaves room for free will and a soulIt's a good thing I listened to the formless audiobook or I'd have had a bonfire right then and thereBut I had the misfortune to be in the middle of my commute to work so I kept readingI tried to find my happy The Balance of George Lucas's Star Wars place during some talk of consciousness as uantum vibrationsThen I wept aloud at the mention of a Lovecraft Country particle source of feelings which might be discovered in the Memorii, vol. I-II particle acceleratorsObviously the wiring and behavior of the brain's neural network is the source of mind and feelingsNick Lane should stick to biology he hasn't the background to discuss Doomsday Men: The Real Dr. Strangelove and the Dream of the Superweapon physics10 DeathFollowing the chapter on consciousness I had little Probably Nothing patience leftThis chapter is about how death works and how we can overcome itThe author seems Essex Boys, The New Generation pretty set in his Ray Kurzweil like denial of the inevitability of deathIt is claimed multiple times that death is simple and can be Whoops!: Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay prevented biochemicallyThe chapter focuses chiefly on the hype surrounding the TOR geneIt's really not worth reading unless you're a fan of Fault Line popular ie mythological Michelangelo: His Epic Life pharmacologyThere is some interesting theorizing as to the evolutionary cause of aging and deathStrangely there is NO MENTION of the Spinning Jenny primary cause of aging telomere shorteningThe Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge primary defense against cancer our body uses is a fixed number of cellular replicationsThis ensures that unless or until malignancy is achieved tumors eventually stop growingThe replication limit on stem cells A Girl in Exile produces a finite lifetime to enjoy tissue repairIt seems obvious to me that reduced uality and speed of tissue repair and replacement amount to the symptoms of agingNick Lane either has never heard of telomeres or has chosen to deceive the reader by leaving them out

FREE DOWNLOAD ¶ E-book, or Kindle E-pub é Nick Lane

Started off as light sensitive spots used to calibrate photosynthesis in algae Or that DNA’s building blocks form spontaneously in hydrothermal vents Lane gives a gripping lucid account of nature’s ingenuity and the result is a work of essential reading for anyone who has ever pondered or uestioned the science underlying evolution’s greatest gifts to ma. A well written description of the in the authors opinion ten greatest inventions of evolutionThese includethe origin of life itself DNA photosynthesis the eukaryotes sex movement sight warm bloodedness homeothermy consciousness and deathThe author is a biochemist and his analysis is very chemical oriented but still very readable for a layperson He explains various techniues for discovering the information in a way I could understandI admit that in some places I lost him but overall the read is interesting and educational“Men are even worse a hundred rounds of cell division are needed to make sperm with each round linked inexorably to mutations Because sperm production goes on throughout life round after round of cell division the older the man the worse it gets As the geneticist James Crow put it the greatest mutational health hazard in the population is fertile old men” “Life itself turned our planet blue and green as tiny photosynthetic bacteria cleansed the oceans of air and sea and filled them with oxygen Powered by this new and potent source of energy life erupted Flowers bloom and beckon intricate corals hide darting gold fish vast monsters lurk in black depths trees reach for the sky animals buzz and lumber and see And in the midst of it all we are moved by the untold mysteries of this creation we cosmic assemblies of molecules that feel and think and marvel and wonder at how we came to be here” The Pleasure Trap photosynthesis in algae Or that DNA’s building blocks form spontaneously in hydrothermal vents Lane gives a gripping lucid account of nature’s ingenuity and the result is a work of essential reading for anyone who has ever Watching Natalie Cheat pondered or uestioned the science underlying evolution’s greatest gifts to ma. A well written description of the in the authors opinion ten greatest inventions of evolutionThese includethe origin of life itself DNA For Just Cause photosynthesis the eukaryotes sex movement sight warm bloodedness homeothermy consciousness and deathThe author is a biochemist and his analysis is very chemical oriented but still very readable for a layperson He explains various techniues for discovering the information in a way I could understandI admit that in some It Feels Good to Be Yourself: A Book About Gender Identity places I lost him but overall the read is interesting and educational“Men are even worse a hundred rounds of cell division are needed to make sperm with each round linked inexorably to mutations Because sperm Teeth in the Mist production goes on throughout life round after round of cell division the older the man the worse it gets As the geneticist James Crow The Information Technology Revolution: The Complete Guide put it the greatest mutational health hazard in the The State of Water population is fertile old men” “Life itself turned our Solutions Manual for Insulation Coordination for Power Systems planet blue and green as tiny Garfield Swallows His Pride photosynthetic bacteria cleansed the oceans of air and sea and filled them with oxygen Powered by this new and Titanshade potent source of energy life erupted Flowers bloom and beckon intricate corals hide darting gold fish vast monsters lurk in black depths trees reach for the sky animals buzz and lumber and see And in the midst of it all we are moved by the untold mysteries of this creation we cosmic assemblies of molecules that feel and think and marvel and wonder at how we came to be here”

Nick Lane é 9 FREE READ

The geochemistry of rocks have helped explain evolution in detail than ever before Nick Lane expertly reconstructs the history of life by describing the ten greatest inventions of evolution including DNA photosynthesis sex and sight based on their historical impact role in organisms today and relevance to current controversies Who would have guessed that eyes. An excellent book that really delves into the biochemical reasons for things being as they are in nature From the origin of life in alkaline vents surrounded by sea water creating organic compounds to the evolutionary reasoning behind the existence of death itself originating from the process of apoptosis cellular suicide in bacterial prehistory to curb bacteriophage infections This book is an excellent introduction into the chemistry of life and the various major fields of study where research has been undertaken to explain the origin of biological features we all take for granted If you pick this book up heads up some sections of the book may seem overtly technical when they begin but if you continue on the argument will be very clear soon enough The author ensures that the reader untrained in biochemistry would retain the core argument before utilising it to explain something far reaching or salient that deeply pertains to life as we know it Highly recommended