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  • Hardcover
  • 240
  • Prime Green Remembering the Sixties
  • Robert Stone
  • English
  • 09 January 2018
  • 9780060198169

10 thoughts on “Prime Green Remembering the Sixties

  1. says:

    I've had the good fortune to read two excellent literary memoirs in the last week or so This one and Paul Theroux's Sir Vidia's Shadow Prime Green Remembering the Sixties is and superbly written The author's ability to compress this picaresue decade of his life into a mere 230 pages is a marvel Stone has long been considered a writer's writer still I would lay odds that some of his nimble phrasing here came from honing these tales at dinner parties and other venues over the years The book is very funny It opens with Stone at the helm of the USS Arneb At sea he keeps two pictures over his desk one of Bridget Bardot the other of the New York City skyline These he calls the poles of his desire His descent into yellow journalism is interesting On discharge he went to work for the New York Daily News perhaps no worse then than it is today and later for a few scuzzy National Enuirer like rags There he was responsible for headlines such as Mad Dentist Yanks Girl's Tongue and Skydiver Devoured by Starving Birds He goes to Hollywood with Paul Newman to make his novel A Hall of Mirrors into an apparently bad movie called WUSA I've never seen it have you?He introduces us to Ken Kesey author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and other works I'm very grateful for the introduction because I've always been led to believe Kesey was a charlatan Au contraire Stone eulogizes his friend here as a great—if often drug addled—man of superior learning and charisma Kesey and his Merry Pranksters are probably most famous for setting off from Northern California in a psychedelic bus for the 1964 New York World's Fair Neal Cassady was the driver Yes that Neal Cassady Kerouac's friend the one immortalized in On the Road One tale of the Pranksters in Mexico—Kesey was on the run from drug charges—has Cassady clandestinely using a hypodermic to dose a roast pig with LSD and amphetamines thus sending the many diners—Stone was one—on an unexpected journey That LSD was originally intended as a Cold War weapon coming out of CIA funded studies at Stamford University and ultimately became a popular drug which changed the minds of Baby Boomers and others in many ways during that time of heightened social consciousness is an irony that resonates to this dayWhen Stone goes to Vietnam as a stringer the narrative grows thin the prose seems rushed fragmented But this is only in the last fifteen pages or so The rest of the book is uite wonderful


  2. says:

    Two things that will color my review of this1 I'm convinced I was born in the wrong decade I am completely addicted to and fascinated by the '60s and '70s to the point where it actually grieves me that I didn't live through them2 Within the first 10 pages I knew that Robert Stone is the kind of guy that I would have fallen head over heels for had I existed in those times and ever met him Maybe that's a weird thing to say and that's honestly never happened to me while reading anything else before but I can safely say that Robert Stone is my kind of guyIt seems to me that most of the people who weren't pleased with this were upset by one of two things or both the realization that this is not in fact another Electric Kool Aid Acid Test or memoir about Kesey and the Merry Pranksters andor Stone's writing style which is rather fuzzyThis is a memoir of Stone's golden years and he treats it as such It's written in such a way that I can hear him telling these stories to me over a meal or a few drinks It's a bit disjointed but not jarringly so and it's filled with the kind of details and retrospect that make hearing about the past so damn interesting There are moments that are stronger than others things that are skipped over Everything is given the proper amount of time in accordance to its weight in his life Nothing is overly romanticized or dramatized just the things that probably were as they happened sunsets in Mexico the moment he decides to marry his wife his experience in Vietnam He looks back not with disappointment or exultation not with emotions distorted by memory and time but with respect and knowledge His passion and excitement for these stories makes it seem as though he lived all of this just yesterday but with the knowledge he possesses today Because of this it feels very honest He's upfront about his mistakes and shortcomings and those of his comrades he doesn't hesitate to show his mistakes with drugs or his relationships and he admits that he thinks Kesey could've been a much monumental figure than he was which is a pretty bold thing to say about someone worshiped as cultishly as Kesey especially considering the two were good friends It's actually a little hard for me to imagine what Stone's fiction must be like because he writes memory so well The arc follows Stone on the wild goose chase of his life Beginning in the Navy it follows his early days as a war journalist and an NYC tabloid journalist working blue collar jobs in New Orleans writing his first novel and seeing it turned into a movie hanging out with Kesey and his gang he wasn't on the entire famous bus journey just the last few days in New York but he did spend a lot of time with Kesey Cassady including their Mexican exile living in California London NYC and ending with his time in Vietnam I rather liked that it started and ended with military service and was filled in between with passion debauchery sensationalism art and drugs It gives him a rather grounded perspective on the era he was clearly taken with its goals and attitudes but not as completely as many of the decades' famous figuresOn the whole a delightful read particularly for those entranced by the times for writers who like hearing aboutfrom other writers and for those on a true uest to live well


  3. says:

    Picked this up at the local library book sale I've never read a novel by Mr Stone though I intend to There're a lot of writers in that category I did see Who'll Stop the Rain the most excellent film version of Dog Soldiers GREAT cast in that movie Certainly one of the best movies from the Vietnam era So far we're still in the late 50's Mr Stone is about my brother's age 9 years older than I amInto the middle of this now the early 1960's RS is in SF and hooking up with KKKen Kesey I read Tom Wolfe's The Electric Kool Aid Acid Test so I'm already somewhat familiar with the events being covered Still it's an entertaining and informative ride The author includes plenty of drug lore including some history of LSD of which I never partook I agree with him that hallucinogens can affect one's thinking I think that my own marijuana usemainly in the late 60's and early 70's was enlightening for me I think it helped me see the world in a bigger objective way that got around all sorts of American cultural indoctrination Of course there was plenty it didn't help me seemainly about myself I can't bring myself to actually recommend drug use but I do remember some fun and interesting times problems arise when we go down the rabbit hole too many times too often It begins to take over one's life; or at least the possibility exists for that to happen it's a risky business The middle of the book spends a lot of time with the Kesey exiles in Mexico This part was covered by Tom Wolfe too The Carmen Gutierrez story in NYC was in the New Yorker long ago very funny Kid put some PIZZAZZ in itMoving on as RS moves to Hollywood to work on the screenplay for WUSAbased on his first book and learns a harsh but inevitable lesson If you try to bleep with Hollywood you'll be the one getting bleeped Still he did get some dough out of it even if the movie was crapthough I admit I've never seen it I don't know if this book will cover his next La La Land experience with Dog Soldiers Doesn't look like it willFinished over the weekend A fine book by a fine writer Too bad it didn't continue but then it wouldn't have been just about the sixties I need to order up some R Stone from inter library loanRS in Vietnam How many times did journalists in the line hear the bitterness of drafted soldiers risking it all for their buddies for their personal honor even God help us for their country as they had been told and believed? How many times did one hear it You don't have to be here you're here to make money off it you could be anywhere you wanted with your high school and your college anywhere but you're here you sick son of a bitch here because you eat this shit up don't you and I hope you die you rotten hearted motherfucker I hope you die Many times 45 rounds down to 4


  4. says:

    Smart guy wonderful voice fascinating time to live through interesting life great sense of perspective on himself Even though he knew Kesey co it's not really about that; it's about a smart young man figuring out how the world works and where he fit into it as a writer and otherwise The voice here it has the faintest hint of Damon Runyon to it that slightly self conscious New York thing as well as some phrasing left over from the sixties so it seems like a palimpsest of growing up in NYC and living through these times Or maybe it was just what he was reading Anyway I enjoyed every sentence of this Very distinct friendly self deprecating in subtle ways Also his politics are great as well as his honesty about how he grew into them He gets a little starry eyed about the times which I gather some people find off putting but it's really about his youth; he just happened to be young at a time when it could be particularly rewardingbut to be young was very heaven to uote a much uoted uote in this context He has the same response to spending a few weeks sleeping on the floor at Shakespeare Co in Paris though but that's the kind of thing that stops being magical after you're thirty or forty or so


  5. says:

    I should have stopped reading this book long before the end I don't know why I kept going Stone has had an interesting life he has met some fascinating people but by the end I really didn't careHow can such an acclaimed author he won the National Book Award for Dog Soldiers make such a hash of his own story?I guess if you are doing research about the 1960's you might want to look at this but otherwise I don't recommend it


  6. says:

    Overall a disappointment It was a little self indulgent and lost my interest about 23 of the way through


  7. says:

    Maybe the bus on the cover should be a clue That ain't THE bus the one you were either on or notStone's recollections are pretty sketchy If you're interested in finding out about what Kesey Cassady or other colorful Sixties characters were like you won't find it here You also won't find out what formative experiences Stone had which might have inspired his writing of his first book which was written and published during the 1958 to 1971 time frame recounted in the book You won't learn what he learned from Wallace Stegner nor what authors he read during this time period You will find some rather misanthropic comments about certain events without much exposition on why he thinks that way Most of these pronouncements will only exasperate the reader He talks about how his group of friends were snobbish about drug taking; he still seems snobbish as he again and again talks about how they blazed this trail for all the lesser beings who would come later A basic lack of generosity informs this book It comes off as slightly cranky and bitter Do we need another cranky 50s 60s self described bohemian to set us straight? Well he doesn't even seem to have the energy to really do that even It seems like a book designed cynically and it's hard not to come away thinking Geez this guy is cynical to make a buck to cash in on all the seemingly interesting people Stone hung out with back in the day populating the book with some pretty tiresome namedropping did he mention that he knew Winona Ryder's father? Well yes than once and anecdotes without a shred of illuminating commentary And there's really nothing about why they took so many drugs and how they affected their livesBut as someone who sweated out the draft in 1972 yes I knew people in that last lottery whose lives were affected I was only puzzled by his statement upon arriving in Vietnam in 1971 that it was over Well not uite Tell that to the parents of the than 4000 GI's yet to die source National Archives or even dramatically the vast numbers of Vietnamese who would be on the receiving end of massive B 52 raids over North Vietnam in 1972I haven't read Stone's fiction which is purportedly dark and pessimistic Having read this book I'm unlikely to


  8. says:

    60s memoir by a novelist who crossed paths with Ken Kesey and Richard Alpert and Alger Hiss lived in San Francisco and London and New York had his first book made into a movie by Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward and did some reporting in Viet Nam All of which makes it sound interesting than it was There is a decent amount of space given over to pointless anecdotes Neal Cassady used to stand by the side of the road in Mexico and salute passing vehicles by holding up a hammer he carried everywhere hmmmmmm cool drug escapades and unremarkable observations I've neither written fiction nor worked on movie but even I have heard that it's very common to be disappointed in how your writing is handled by HollywoodHe can definitely write and there are some memorable scenes incl a cross country trip via Greyhound in which he's picked on by some Navy guys from Pittsburgh but for the most part his talent is not put to great use here


  9. says:

    I've thought about reading this book multiple times in the past but having no particular interest in or rather an aversion to old hippie memoirs I put it down But what was I thinking? this is Robert Stone a fabulous writer and I can see after a very few pages that this is going to be a very interesting bookBoy was I wrong about that He did start the book out with a well written account of a sight that moved him from his Navy days a mass migration of penguins in the water but what followed was a very lazy disjointed rambling account of the sixties that was most unmemorable It ends weakly with the line my only regret is that we didn't prevail although what prevailing could mean for the disjointed and dissolute adventurers he describes I can't imagineA disappointing and boring book


  10. says:

    Even those interested in writer Robert Stone and sixties counter culture may be slightly disappointed by Prime Green Chapter 12 published as a separate piece in the New Yorker is a chronicle of Ken Kesey's flight to Mexico after his 1965 drug arrest A cynical take on the mutation of the mid sixties hippy culture it is the best section of the book The remainder of the book has a much narrower personal focus and does not provide much historical perspective Unfortunately as a personal memoir it is about as revealing as a social calendar Events are recounted without much context or continuity and we never really learn much about Stone's evolution as a writer during what must have been his formative years


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Prime Green Remembering the Sixties

Robert Stone ☆ 6 Free download

Antarctic expedition navigating the globe and ends in Vietnam where he was a correspondent in the days following the invasion of Laos Told in scintillating detail Prime Green zips from coast to coast from days spent in the raucous offices of Manhattan tabloids to the breathtaking beaches of Mexico and merry times aboard the bus with Kesey and the PrankstersBuilding on personal vignettes from Stone's travels Overall a disappointment It was a little self indulgent and lost my interest about 23 of the way through

Characters ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Robert Stone

Across America this powerful memoir offers the legendary novelist's inside perspective on a time many understand only peripherally These accounts of the 1960s are riveting not only because Stone is a master storyteller but because he was there in the thick of it through all the wild times From these incredible experiences Prime Green forges a moving and adventurous portrait of a uniue moment in American histo 60s memoir by a novelist who crossed paths with Ken Kesey and Richard Alpert and Alger Hiss lived in San Francisco and London and New York had his first book made into a movie by Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward and did some reporting in Viet Nam All of which makes it sound interesting than it was There is a decent amount of space given over to pointless anecdotes Neal Cassady used to stand by the side of the road in Mexico and salute passing vehicles by holding up a hammer he carried everywhere hmmmmmm cool drug escapades and unremarkable observations I've neither written fiction nor worked on movie but even I have heard that it's very common to be disappointed in how your writing is handled by HollywoodHe can definitely write and there are some memorable scenes incl a cross country trip via Greyhound in which he's picked on by some Navy guys from Pittsburgh but for the most part his talent is not put to great use here

Read & download Prime Green Remembering the Sixties

A memoir of America's most turbulent whimsical decade in the words of the man who experienced it allFrom the New York City of Kline and De Kooning to the jazz era of New Orleans's French uarter to Ken Kesey's psychedelic California Prime Green explores the 1960s in all its weird innocent fascinating glory An account framed by two wars it begins with Robert Stone's last year in the Navy when he took part in an Two things that will color my review of this1 I'm convinced I was born in the wrong decade I am completely addicted to and fascinated by the '60s and '70s to the point where it actually grieves me that I didn't live through them2 Within the first 10 pages I knew that Robert Stone is the kind of guy that I would have fallen head over heels for had I existed in those times and ever met him Maybe that's a weird thing to say and that's honestly never happened to me while reading anything else before but I can safely say that Robert Stone is my kind of guyIt seems to me that most of the people who weren't pleased with this were upset by one of two things or both the realization that this is not in fact another Electric Kool Aid Acid Test or memoir about Kesey and the Merry Pranksters andor Stone's writing style which is rather fuzzyThis is a memoir of Stone's golden years and he treats it as such It's written in such a way that I can hear him telling these stories to me over a meal or a few drinks It's a bit disjointed but not jarringly so and it's filled with the kind of details and retrospect that make hearing about the past so damn interesting There are moments that are stronger than others things that are skipped over Everything is given the proper amount of time in accordance to its weight in his life Nothing is overly romanticized or dramatized just the things that probably were as they happened sunsets in Mexico the moment he decides to marry his wife his experience in Vietnam He looks back not with disappointment or exultation not with emotions distorted by memory and time but with respect and knowledge His passion and excitement for these stories makes it seem as though he lived all of this just yesterday but with the knowledge he possesses today Because of this it feels very honest He's upfront about his mistakes and shortcomings and those of his comrades he doesn't hesitate to show his mistakes with drugs or his relationships and he admits that he thinks Kesey could've been a much monumental figure than he was which is a pretty bold thing to say about someone worshiped as cultishly as Kesey especially considering the two were good friends It's actually a little hard for me to imagine what Stone's fiction must be like because he writes memory so well The arc follows Stone on the wild goose chase of his life Beginning in the Navy it follows his early days as a war journalist and an NYC tabloid journalist working blue collar jobs in New Orleans writing his first novel and seeing it turned into a movie hanging out with Kesey and his gang he wasn't on the entire famous bus journey just the last few days in New York but he did spend a lot of time with Kesey Cassady including their Mexican exile living in California London NYC and ending with his time in Vietnam I rather liked that it started and ended with military service and was filled in between with passion debauchery sensationalism art and drugs It gives him a rather grounded perspective on the era he was clearly taken with its goals and attitudes but not as completely as many of the decades' famous figuresOn the whole a delightful read particularly for those entranced by the times for writers who like hearing aboutfrom other writers and for those on a true uest to live well


About the Author: Robert Stone

ROBERT STONE was the author of seven novels A Hall of Mirrors Dog Soldiers winner of the National Book Award A Flag for Sunrise Children of Light Outerbridge Reach Damascus Gate and Bay of Souls His story collection Bear and His Daughter was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and his memoir Prime Green was published in 2006 His work was typically characterized by psychological compl