REVIEW ¶ Splitting an Order



10 thoughts on “Splitting an Order

  1. says:

    I learned a valuable lesson from Kooser years ago in his poem about Depression glass You don’t have to wait for epic subjects like death floods war birth or marriage to write good poems The small moments and everyday objects surrounding us hold universal truths about who we are – “to see a world in a grain of sand” as William Blake saidHe takes the idea of turning everyday life into art even further by writing about things many of us find disgusting and not worthy of a second thought or look “Dead Bat” “Dead Fly” and “Mouse in a Trap” for example Those poems are some of my favorites From now on I’ll see a dead fly as a “black sedan” that “lies on its topits wheels in the air its batteries drained” In “Opossum” he says “I pushed aside some of my own fearto admire you” and he teaches us to do the sameKooser always chooses the right word the clear image the subject that will teach us something new about our world without being preachy or arrogant Above all else his poems are a pleasure to readEven the book title hooks Kooser fans who already treasure his sweet poem “Splitting the Order” The tenderness of an old man cutting a sandwich in half to share with his wife is an apt metaphor for the whole book Kooser shares his observations with us He and readers are partners in each poem Of course when we finish we hold out our plates for


  2. says:

    Let me say before I write anything that I absolutely love Ted Kooser Without ever having met him or having any communication with him whatsoever I've taken to calling him Uncle Ted and returning to his poems whenever life is too much like a pathless wood as Yeats would have itSplitting an order is not Kooser's best book Delights and Shadows might be or Local Wonders I've got The Wheeling Year on my night table to begin tonight so stayed tuned for any possible ranking changes But it's still a pleasure Recently I've been uite disappointed with some of my favorite poets' new collections Stephen Dunn and Louise Gluck in particular But Splitting an Order still shines with that wonderful Kooser simplicity and his amazing eye for detail In one poem Changing Drivers Kooser describes a couple pulled off to the side of the road to get a uick stretch and switch driving duties Such a banality is the stuff Kooser makes holy they stoop and fit themselves insideand the car's springs settle a littleand each of them reaches a long way outto pull the doors shut her door firstthen his and they rock and shiftfastening their belts then both of themlean forward almost simultaneouslyand peer into their side view mirrorsto see whatever is bearing down from wherever they've been and togetherthey ease out over the crunching gravelonto the highway and move onAs a poet when I read Kooser I'm always trying to figure out how he does what he does But somewhere along the way I stop caring and simply become a fan again a reader only reading a couple poems a day from this book so as to savor them


  3. says:

    This was a very uick read It walks you through a few precious experiences in simple straight to the point lovely poems It was good to read in the breaks between a weekend with friendsIt does deal with seeing and moments part of my particular interests in life being in the present observing thinking metaphorically as a way of lifeMany types of art serve different purposes While not overly sentimental this book is also not pushing the bounds of poetry or conversing in the language of some of the esoteric poets Whether or not it has value to you is a matter of judgement on your part I supposeAs for me I thought it pleasant Not mind blowing but pleasant Which is okay for sunny afternoons in the summer no?


  4. says:

    I wanted to love this poetry collection but I ended up just liking it I am big fan of Ted Kooser and I look forward to reading the poems he selects for the American Life in Poetry column he publishes weekly Overall I found these poems to have very nice descriptions but many of them lacked the ah ha moments I look for in poetry I think it's Billy Collins who said that good poetry begins in Kansas and ends in Oz For this Kooser collection most of the poems begin in Nebraska and stay there not that there's anything bad about thatSome gemsTwoThe PastFirst Marriage


  5. says:

    My favorite poets are those that make us say “oh yes I understand that because I’ve felt that way too or I’ve seen the same thing but haven’t known how to find the words for it” Ted Kooser does that with poems about ordinary life that are both beautifully simple and deeply profound Like Mary Oliver he’s especially good at paying close attention to what can so easily be ignored otherwise in order to capture the essence of what our lives have to tell us The titles of the poems in this collection are examples of Kooser’s ability to use what we’re likely to see or experience on any given day to reflect something universal about the relationships we have with others and the significance of what goes on in our lives from one day to the next Near a Mall; Changing Drivers; In a Gift Shop; Tree Removal; Estate Sale; At a Kitchen Table; Painting a Barn Even sleep apnea as well as what goes on in a fast food restaurant at noon end up telling us something important about everyday life His poems about people capture the sometimes complicated as well as tender business of being human Swinging from Parents; the Roller Blader; Two Men on an Errand; and the gentle poem that is also the title of this volume Splitting an Order Those who believe that unless you have to work hard to unravel a poem’s meaning because of the poet’s deliberate use of complicated metaphors and confusing language will probably find Kooser’s poetry to be too “accessible” However I’ve never understood why that should be a criticism It seems to me that poetry is meant to communicate something about being human that touches us and resonates with us Why we should have to spend hours trying to figure it out is hard for me to understand especially when there are poets like Ted Kooser who do such a beautiful job of using language clearly and deliberately to call our attention to something we wouldn’t have otherwise paid attention to It could explain why his poetry won him the Pulitzer Prize in 2005 and got him named our National Poet Laureate from 2004 2006


  6. says:

    Clearly and surely this is a mellow book by an older poet who is comfortable with his time and place yet has kept eyes and ears and heart open Ted Kooser is our Nebraskan poet who served as Poet Laureate for a country and for poets who thrive on the simple and direct Yet that is not saying that his poems are simple for they manage to sense and convey the uiet meaning of thingsour dream life a weighty thing like life itself in which you dip the leaky cup of your hands and drink One of the most resonant poems in this echoing book is Estate Sale in which the poet browses the old estate giving out the images of objects in vivid detail yet suggesting the life behind the objects A sample would be An empty coffee canwrapped in aluminum foilIn this poor urn the peoniesrode to the graveyardcovering their faceswith immaculate glovesThere is a slow motion poignancy about this whole book Though many of the poems read like wonderful openings to a novel that stop short we are there with him in uiet intimacy The poet closes with a self portrait poem of himself as A Person of Limited Palette accepting himself and his life advising If you should come looking for me you'll find me here in Nebraska thirty miles south of the broad Platte River under the flyway of dreams And you will find him in this fine book knowing that we are fortunate to have him with us


  7. says:

    Ted Kooser is the big eye behind the magnifying glasswhen it comes to the small and uiet things in lifeAnd I love what that eye records while it's at workHe's worth the time Several poems should not be missedSo what can I do but give it a thumbs upAnd here it is


  8. says:

    It's unfair to measure everything by Delights and Shadows I love this man


  9. says:

    Kooser employs simple language to make the most uncannily astute observations Example From “Estate Sale” A 25 amp glass fuseUnder the clear ice of its surfaceIt is easy to see the silver ribbonOf a motionless fishIts body aligned with the currentOrLanternIn the predawn cold and darknessIt was only a pinch of lightNot than a cup of warmthAs a farmer carried it over the snowTo the barn where his dozen cowsStood stomping heavy with milkIn the milky cloud of their lowingBut that was many years agoAnd his lantern has rustedIts last fumes lost on the seasonsLike the breath of those cowsBut at the last he thought to leaveA fresh ribbon of wick coiled upIn the chimney in case it was everNeeded again a dollar’s worthOf preparation And getting preparedFor a later winter a pregnant mouseWas able to sueeze through a ventAnd unravel that wick and makeA cottony nest with dustyPanoramic windows and there to raiseHer bald and mewling pissy broodAnd then for them to disappearThe way we all one day move onLeaving a little sharp whiffOf ourselves in the dirty beddingA poet who truly celebrates life


  10. says:

    Ted Kooser makes one see the ordinary details of everyday life through a fresh lens In this collection of short poems and one essay he is able to use plain language no dictionary needed but forces the reader to examine various images moods seasons behaviors Each poem presents the world in a fresh pleasing way


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Splitting an Order

READ & DOWNLOAD Splitting an Order

Profound magnificenceFrom Splitting an Order I like to watch an old man cutting a sandwich in half and then to see him lift halfonto the extra plate that he asked the server to bringand then to wait offering the plate to his wifewhile she slowly unrolls her napkin and places her spoonher knife and her fork in their proper placesthen smoothes the starched white napkin over her kneesand meets his eyes and holds out both old hands to himTed Kooser is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose including Delights and Shadows Copper Canyon Press which won the Pulitzer Prize A former US Poet Laureate Kooser serves as editor for American Life in Poetry a nationally syndicated weekly newspaper column Kooser employs simple language to make the most uncannily astute observations Example From “Estate Sale” A 25 amp glass fuseUnder the clear ice of its surfaceIt is easy to see the silver ribbonOf a motionless fishIts body aligned with the currentOrLanternIn the predawn cold and darknessIt was only a pinch of lightNot than a cup of warmthAs a farmer carried it over the snowTo the barn where his dozen cowsStood stomping heavy with milkIn the milky cloud of their lowingBut that was many years agoAnd his lantern has rustedIts last fumes lost on the seasonsLike the breath of those cowsBut at the last he thought to leaveA fresh ribbon of wick coiled upIn the chimney in case it was everNeeded again a dollar’s worthOf preparation And getting preparedFor a later winter a pregnant mouseWas able to sueeze through a ventAnd unravel that wick and makeA cottony nest with dustyPanoramic windows and there to raiseHer bald and mewling pissy broodAnd then for them to disappearThe way we all one day move onLeaving a little sharp whiffOf ourselves in the dirty beddingA poet who truly celebrates life The State of Water plate that he asked the server to bringand then to wait offering the Solutions Manual for Insulation Coordination for Power Systems plate to his wifewhile she slowly unrolls her napkin and Garfield Swallows His Pride places her spoonher knife and her fork in their Titanshade proper AI Weiwei's Blog: Writings, Interviews, and Digital Rants, 2006-2009 placesthen smoothes the starched white napkin over her kneesand meets his eyes and holds out both old hands to himTed Kooser is the author of numerous books of Minds of the West: Ethnocultural Evolution in the Rural Middle West, 1830-1917 poetry and Surf Craft prose including Delights and Shadows Copper Canyon Press which won the Pulitzer Prize A former US Poet Laureate Kooser serves as editor for American Life in Poetry a nationally syndicated weekly newspaper column Kooser employs simple language to make the most uncannily astute observations Example From “Estate Sale” A 25 amp glass fuseUnder the clear ice of its surfaceIt is easy to see the silver ribbonOf a motionless fishIts body aligned with the currentOrLanternIn the Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts predawn cold and darknessIt was only a Telling Teddy (Dear Teddy: A Journal Of A Boy pinch of lightNot than a cup of warmthAs a farmer carried it over the snowTo the barn where his dozen cowsStood stomping heavy with milkIn the milky cloud of their lowingBut that was many years agoAnd his lantern has rustedIts last fumes lost on the seasonsLike the breath of those cowsBut at the last he thought to leaveA fresh ribbon of wick coiled upIn the chimney in case it was everNeeded again a dollar’s worthOf Cool Optical Illusions: Creative Activities That Make Math & Science Fun for Kids! preparation And getting Everwar preparedFor a later winter a Hot Head (Head pregnant mouseWas able to sueeze through a ventAnd unravel that wick and makeA cottony nest with dustyPanoramic windows and there to raiseHer bald and mewling Hot Head pissy broodAnd then for them to disappearThe way we all one day move onLeaving a little sharp whiffOf ourselves in the dirty beddingA The Killing Ritual poet who truly celebrates life

READ ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ê Ted Kooser

One of the Big Indie Books of Fall 2014 Publishers Weekly Paterson Poetry Prize 2015Ted Kooser must be the most accessible and enjoyable major poet in America His lines are so clear and simple Michael Dirda The Washington Post“Readers of Splitting an Order will find ‘characters’ both strange and wonderful animal or human There is a sense that time is passing uickly and that everything worthy must be captured and savored from an old couple lovingly sharing a sandwich to another sowing seed potatoes to a tribute to an old dog who waits as age and winter approach Master of the single metaphor poem Kooser offers images that evolve fluid and unforced” Library Journal starred reviewWisdom comp I learned a valuable lesson from Kooser years ago in his poem about Depression glass You don’t have to wait for epic subjects like death floods war birth or marriage to write good poems The small moments and everyday objects surrounding us hold universal truths about who we are – “to see a world in a grain of sand” as William Blake saidHe takes the idea of turning everyday life into art even further by writing about things many of us find disgusting and not worthy of a second thought or look “Dead Bat” “Dead Fly” and “Mouse in a Trap” for example Those poems are some of my favorites From now on I’ll see a dead fly as a “black sedan” that “lies on its topits wheels in the air its batteries drained” In “Opossum” he says “I pushed aside some of my own fearto admire you” and he teaches us to do the sameKooser always chooses the right word the clear image the subject that will teach us something new about our world without being preachy or arrogant Above all else his poems are a pleasure to readEven the book title hooks Kooser fans who already treasure his sweet poem “Splitting the Order” The tenderness of an old man cutting a sandwich in half to share with his wife is an apt metaphor for the whole book Kooser shares his observations with us He and readers are partners in each poem Of course when we finish we hold out our plates for Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts poet in America His lines are so clear and simple Michael Dirda The Washington Post“Readers of Splitting an Order will find ‘characters’ both strange and wonderful animal or human There is a sense that time is Telling Teddy (Dear Teddy: A Journal Of A Boy passing uickly and that everything worthy must be captured and savored from an old couple lovingly sharing a sandwich to another sowing seed Cool Optical Illusions: Creative Activities That Make Math & Science Fun for Kids! potatoes to a tribute to an old dog who waits as age and winter approach Master of the single metaphor Everwar poem Kooser offers images that evolve fluid and unforced” Library Journal starred reviewWisdom comp I learned a valuable lesson from Kooser years ago in his Hot Head (Head poem about Depression glass You don’t have to wait for epic subjects like death floods war birth or marriage to write good Hot Head poems The small moments and everyday objects surrounding us hold universal truths about who we are – “to see a world in a grain of sand” as William Blake saidHe takes the idea of turning everyday life into art even further by writing about things many of us find disgusting and not worthy of a second thought or look “Dead Bat” “Dead Fly” and “Mouse in a Trap” for example Those The Killing Ritual poems are some of my favorites From now on I’ll see a dead fly as a “black sedan” that “lies on its topits wheels in the air its batteries drained” In “Opossum” he says “I Pan's Travail: Environmental Problems of the Ancient Greeks and Romans pushed aside some of my own fearto admire you” and he teaches us to do the sameKooser always chooses the right word the clear image the subject that will teach us something new about our world without being Portuguese-English Bilingual Visual Dictionary preachy or arrogant Above all else his The Call of the Wild poems are a Doctor Who: Witch Hunters: The History Collection pleasure to readEven the book title hooks Kooser fans who already treasure his sweet Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything poem “Splitting the Order” The tenderness of an old man cutting a sandwich in half to share with his wife is an apt metaphor for the whole book Kooser shares his observations with us He and readers are James Bond Encyclopedia partners in each Smoking with Crohn's poem Of course when we finish we hold out our Everyone's Guide To Food Self Sufficiency plates for

Ted Kooser Ê 9 REVIEW

Assion and dignity continue to mark the poetry of Ted Kooser Splitting an Order is a uiet collection that honors small victories and gives reasons to be hopeful Elizabeth Lund The Christian Science MonitorKooser's ability to discover the smallest detail and render it remarkable is a rare gift Bloomsbury ReviewPulitzer Prize winner and best selling poet Ted Kooser calls attention to the intimacies of life through commonplace objects and occurrences an elderly couple sharing a sandwich is a study in transcendent love while a tattered packet of spinach seeds calls forth innate human potential This long awaited collection from the former US Poet Laureate ten years in the making is rich with uiet and My favorite poets are those that make us say “oh yes I understand that because I’ve felt that way too or I’ve seen the same thing but haven’t known how to find the words for it” Ted Kooser does that with poems about ordinary life that are both beautifully simple and deeply profound Like Mary Oliver he’s especially good at paying close attention to what can so easily be ignored otherwise in order to capture the essence of what our lives have to tell us The titles of the poems in this collection are examples of Kooser’s ability to use what we’re likely to see or experience on any given day to reflect something universal about the relationships we have with others and the significance of what goes on in our lives from one day to the next Near a Mall; Changing Drivers; In a Gift Shop; Tree Removal; Estate Sale; At a Kitchen Table; Painting a Barn Even sleep apnea as well as what goes on in a fast food restaurant at noon end up telling us something important about everyday life His poems about people capture the sometimes complicated as well as tender business of being human Swinging from Parents; the Roller Blader; Two Men on an Errand; and the gentle poem that is also the title of this volume Splitting an Order Those who believe that unless you have to work hard to unravel a poem’s meaning because of the poet’s deliberate use of complicated metaphors and confusing language will probably find Kooser’s poetry to be too “accessible” However I’ve never understood why that should be a criticism It seems to me that poetry is meant to communicate something about being human that touches us and resonates with us Why we should have to spend hours trying to figure it out is hard for me to understand especially when there are poets like Ted Kooser who do such a beautiful job of using language clearly and deliberately to call our attention to something we wouldn’t have otherwise paid attention to It could explain why his poetry won him the Pulitzer Prize in 2005 and got him named our National Poet Laureate from 2004 2006