The Wall Summary à E-book, or Kindle E-pub


10 thoughts on “The Wall

  1. says:

    ReviewI must apologize in advance for the tear drops splattered across this review I tried to contain them but they just kept coming The Wall is one of the most hauntingly beautiful books I've read in many many years While The Wall is set in a fictional location its plot and what it represents is very realJoshua is such a great moral character He tries so hard to do what is right knowing what it would cost him and those he loves if found out Joshua is a true force for good in a world that sometimes is anything but When he finds himself over The Wall I could feel his wonderment and sorrow at the disparity in the lives of the people living in its shadow unfortunate to be on wrong sideLeia is a girl living on the wrong side of The Wall When she meets Joshua she does the unthinkable and shelters him in her house until the threat passes What starts out as a meeting of chance blossoms into so much I fell in love with this little girl from the wrong side of the tracks We don't get to see much of her but when we do the Author makes it count How this girl with so few lines could make me feel so much emotion at her scenes truly is a credit to the great writing from the AuthorOverall I loved The Wall with its beautiful writing sympathetic characters and realistic plot In fact I think this book should be reuired reading for middle school children It would do them good to read about the west bank and the struggles those people go through each and every day I guess what I'm trying to say is I highly recommend picking this one up recommend it be stocked in your local library and share it with friends Yes it was that good In the end I will be rating The Wall by William Sutcliffe ★★★★★


  2. says:

    Here is the review I published a while ago I reserve 5 stars for a select few books in my life; so a 4 star rating is truly a high rating from me a novel that depicts an oppressed society when you are not a member of that society is a risky undertaking in my estimation When it comes to the Palestinian narrative the task is even sensitive as Western audiences have mostly been exposed to reductive stories written by non PalestiniansIt is not surprising then that a Palestinian might have reason for pause when confronted with a novel that reflects life under Israeli occupation written by a British Jewish authorRight or wrong the author’s background is relevant to me in such circumstances So I admit that I picked up Sutcliffe’s latest novel The Wall Bloomsbury 2013 holding my breath because a people’s narrative their truth their memories and their very real pain is not to be taken lightly in literatureSutcliffe clearly understood this and he created what I believe is the best work of fiction on Palestine written by a non Palestinian The Wall is many things – a coming of age story a fast paced captivating novel Most importantly it is a fresh and intriguing look at the most intractable conflict of our time written with suspense and cultural insightThe story opens when Joshua’s ball lands in a fenced construction zone When he climbs over to retrieve it he finds a destroyed home unlike anything he had ever seen in Amarias the clean manicured place where he lives The things of living still inhabit the house like “a telephone with no receiver trailing a wire that snakes away as if it is still expecting call” Joshua is immobilized by a feeling he cannot understand “something to do with the obvious suddenness with which this place was transformed from a home into a heap of junk”There Joshua discovers a tunnel that runs under the separation wall to the forbidden side where the enemies live Compelled by curiosity and a sense of adventure Joshua crawls through and the prose carries the reader in Joshua’s heart as he navigates through fear in the dark dank underground What Joshua finds at the other end of the tunnel unhinges everything he had been taught to believe and he emerges with eyes that see clearly the surreal way in which his world had been manufactured “not one thing I can see feels like it is mine” he says “A man speaks and it’s Liev – the man who pretends to be my father sitting at the table that pretends to be a dinning table in this house that pretends to be my house”Sutcliffe tells us that Amarias the fictional town where Joshua lives is based on the illegal Israeli settlements in the West Bank But the words “Israel” and “Palestine” are never used allowing for a weightless narrative unencumbered by preconceptionsI thought the superficially apolitical approach to a deeply political space was effective reminding me of Orwell’s Animal Farm It has the ability to speak to readers of a wide range of ages from young teens to senior adults with layers of meaning revealed in accordance with the reader’s background Further and importantly there is an authenticity to the narrative that speaks to the author’s insight and ability for true empathyThe most wonderful thing about this novel however is the way it keeps the reader teetering on the edge of Joshua’s innocence in the place where fundamental choices about an individual’s life path are made We root for Joshua to follow his heart at the same time we fear for him to do so The brilliance of The Wall is also in the way it allows the reader seamless and natural access to a great unfolding international drama It does so through the eyes of a boy enchanted with a young girl on the other side of a wall that splits the world; and through his promise to an old farmer to heal a parched patch of earth with dying olive treesThe tenderness of this novel is matched only by the author’s integrity as Sutcliffe stipulated in his book contract that a significant percent of his royalties go to the world and children whose lives he wrote about Playgrounds for Palestine a Palestinian children’s NGO that I founded has received and will continue to receive 15% of the author’s royalties for The Wall It should be noted that Playgrounds for Palestine is an all volunteer labor of love organization that does not pay compensation to any staff or board membersI highly recommend this novel for young and old alike It’s a fast read that grips the reader’s attention from the beginning and long after you’ve read the last pages you will be thinking of Joshua’s life peeling back the layers and finding deeper meaning


  3. says:

    In the beginning of this novel you think you are in a dystopian world with the forbidding Wall and the tunnel which snakes underneath it to the other side into a very unfamiliar world A tense and gripping read you soon realise that the setting is a contemporary dystopia it mirrors what is played out daily in the West Bank Although never mentioned specifically the adult reader comes to understand that Joshua is an Israeli and the people on the other side are PalestinianSutcliffe has written a powerful crossover novel where YA readers can appreciate it as a boy's adventure story and adults as a story of a young boy on the West Bank trying to make sense of the world in which he lives a world divided by The WallThe ending is moving and inspiring there are no easy answers and herein lies the lesson of this modern day fableHighly recommended for both YA and Adult readers


  4. says:

    I hesitated over the rating for this book 4 or 5 stars In the end I went for 5 despite or because of its flaws The situation portrayed is not clear cut there are no easy answers and no one escapes undamaged by the events in it I don't agree with one of the other reviewers that the portrayal is one sided; I think the author does a good job of showing that fear on both sides and a failure to see the enemy as fellow humans is at the core of the entrenched positions which form the framework of the book He doesn't go into the detailed background of the conflict or the personal involvement of the characters in it specifically Liev but I think that was a wise decision to avoid getting bogged down in a uasi factual description which could have weakened the book's power Time and again it seemed that the story gave the author an opportunity to provide a neat ending but he shows great integrity in avoiding that temptation and as a result the book is truthful and challenging I'm disappointed that it didn't make the short list for the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize and hope that it will get the recognition it deserves elsewhere


  5. says:

    The Wall is a hard book to review It's really an analysis of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict the West Bank in particular thinly disguised as fiction Joshua is a young boy on one side of the wall who through a series of fortunate or unfortunate events comes into contact with and befriends a family from the other side The friendship will have profound conseuences on his own life and the lives of those around him On the one hand there are many things that William Sutcliffe does just right The writing is tight; there are no unnecesary words here He suceeds in the characterisation of Joshua who on top of being a normal 13 year old boy going through all of the normal stuff 13 year olds go through is also in the uniue situation of growing up with only a vague idea of the political military and religious struggles that are going on around him He comes across as naieve but not to naieve Intelligent but not to intelligent Strong but not to strong I found the secondary characters hit and miss The characterisation of Leila a girl of his own age that Joshua meets across the Wall is excellent His stepfather Liev is two dimensional and seems to exist simply to hammer in a point view spoilerthat people on the 'right' side of the Wall aren't always 'good' hide spoiler


  6. says:

    Joshua's city is surrounded by a wall and military checkpoints It is believed that those who live on the opposite side of the wall are dangerous terrorists When Joshua's soccer ball is accidentally kicked into a building site he climbs over the wall to retrieve it and discovers a tunnel This raises his curiosity and soon he is crawling through the tunnel into another world Written in five parts Joshua returns to the forbidden side of the wall after a girl there helps him escape from a gang of boys In each part of the story a serious outcome results from visits to the other side Joshua is a compassionate character and deals with a lot of abuse from his stepfather His bravery and determination to help the girl and her family are to be admired In notes following the story the author reveals that the idea came from Israel's West Bank Wall


  7. says:

    I AM SO HAPPY TO HAVE FINISHED THIS BOOK It was reuired for school and I struggled through the first hundred pages in which the protagonist was in serious need of an adventure But in the end I feel like I have a much better perspective on struggles in Israel


  8. says:

    When I picked up the book and read the back cover I thought it would be something like the maze runner But I was so wrong so wrong Although the beginning is a bit slow I found myself reading and not able to stop Just like Joshua you don't know about the world out there at first And then you slowly built knowledge around that I think he's very brave his attitude That really touched me The ending was the least what I had expected and it made me sad but also really emotional The message of the story is very beautiful


  9. says:

    Presented almost as a dystopia you soon realise that it's real current but somehow further away for that Very well written engaging and with an all important happy ending


  10. says:

    This book has incredible detail and suspense and tells a great story Also my dad is in the credits


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The Wall

Characters ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ☆ William Sutcliffe

E Wall is the only thing keeping his people safe from a brutal and unforgiving enemyOne day Joshua stumbles across a tunnel that leads underneath the Wall The chance to catch a glimpse of life on the other side of The Wall is too tempting to resist He's heard. Joshua's city is surrounded by a wall and military checkpoints It is believed that those who live on the opposite side of the wall are dangerous terrorists When Joshua's soccer ball is accidentally kicked into a building site he climbs over the wall to retrieve it and discovers a tunnel This raises his curiosity and soon he is crawling through the tunnel into another world Written in five parts Joshua returns to the forbidden side of the wall after a girl there helps him escape from a gang of boys In each part of the story a serious outcome results from visits to the other side Joshua is a compassionate character and deals with a lot of abuse from his stepfather His bravery and determination to help the girl and her family are to be admired In notes following the story the author reveals that the idea came from Israel's West Bank Wall

Summary The Wall

Plenty of stories about the other side but nothing has prepared him for what he finds Set in a tense reality closely mirroring Israel's West bank this deeply affecting parable of a boy who undertakes a short journey to another world lingers long after completi. Presented almost as a dystopia you soon realise that it's real current but somehow further away for that Very well written engaging and with an all important happy ending

Characters ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ☆ William Sutcliffe

Joshua lives with his mother and step father in Amarias an isolated town where all the houses are brand new Amarias is surrounded by a high wall guarded by soldiers which can only be crossed through a heavily fortified checkpoint Joshua has been taught that th. Here is the review I published a while ago I reserve 5 stars for a select few books in my life; so a 4 star rating is truly a high rating from me a novel that depicts an oppressed society when you are not a member of that society is a risky undertaking in my estimation When it comes to the Palestinian narrative the task is even sensitive as Western audiences have mostly been exposed to reductive stories written by non PalestiniansIt is not surprising then that a Palestinian might have reason for pause when confronted with a novel that reflects life under Israeli occupation written by a British Jewish authorRight or wrong the author’s background is relevant to me in such circumstances So I admit that I picked up Sutcliffe’s latest novel The Wall Bloomsbury 2013 holding my breath because a people’s narrative their truth their memories and their very real pain is not to be taken lightly in literatureSutcliffe clearly understood this and he created what I believe is the best work of fiction on Palestine written by a non Palestinian The Wall is many things – a coming of age story a fast paced captivating novel Most importantly it is a fresh and intriguing look at the most intractable conflict of our time written with suspense and cultural insightThe story opens when Joshua’s ball lands in a fenced construction zone When he climbs over to retrieve it he finds a destroyed home unlike anything he had ever seen in Amarias the clean manicured place where he lives The things of living still inhabit the house like “a telephone with no receiver trailing a wire that snakes away as if it is still expecting call” Joshua is immobilized by a feeling he cannot understand “something to do with the obvious suddenness with which this place was transformed from a home into a heap of junk”There Joshua discovers a tunnel that runs under the separation wall to the forbidden side where the enemies live Compelled by curiosity and a sense of adventure Joshua crawls through and the prose carries the reader in Joshua’s heart as he navigates through fear in the dark dank underground What Joshua finds at the other end of the tunnel unhinges everything he had been taught to believe and he emerges with eyes that see clearly the surreal way in which his world had been manufactured “not one thing I can see feels like it is mine” he says “A man speaks and it’s Liev – the man who pretends to be my father sitting at the table that pretends to be a dinning table in this house that pretends to be my house”Sutcliffe tells us that Amarias the fictional town where Joshua lives is based on the illegal Israeli settlements in the West Bank But the words “Israel” and “Palestine” are never used allowing for a weightless narrative unencumbered by preconceptionsI thought the superficially apolitical approach to a deeply political space was effective reminding me of Orwell’s Animal Farm It has the ability to speak to readers of a wide range of ages from young teens to senior adults with layers of meaning revealed in accordance with the reader’s background Further and importantly there is an authenticity to the narrative that speaks to the author’s insight and ability for true empathyThe most wonderful thing about this novel however is the way it keeps the reader teetering on the edge of Joshua’s innocence in the place where fundamental choices about an individual’s life path are made We root for Joshua to follow his heart at the same time we fear for him to do so The brilliance of The Wall is also in the way it allows the reader seamless and natural access to a great unfolding international drama It does so through the eyes of a boy enchanted with a young girl on the other side of a wall that splits the world; and through his promise to an old farmer to heal a parched patch of earth with dying olive treesThe tenderness of this novel is matched only by the author’s integrity as Sutcliffe stipulated in his book contract that a significant percent of his royalties go to the world and children whose lives he wrote about Playgrounds for Palestine a Palestinian children’s NGO that I founded has received and will continue to receive 15% of the author’s royalties for The Wall It should be noted that Playgrounds for Palestine is an all volunteer labor of love organization that does not pay compensation to any staff or board membersI highly recommend this novel for young and old alike It’s a fast read that grips the reader’s attention from the beginning and long after you’ve read the last pages you will be thinking of Joshua’s life peeling back the layers and finding deeper meaning

  • Hardcover
  • 304
  • The Wall
  • William Sutcliffe
  • English
  • 19 September 2019
  • 9780802734921

About the Author: William Sutcliffe

William Sutcliffe was born in 1971 in London He is the author of eight novels New Boy Are You Experienced The Love Hexagon Bad Influence Whatever Makes You Happy The Wall Concentr8 and We See Everything which have been translated into twenty six languages The Wall was shortlisted for the 2014 CILIP Carnegie Medal Are You Experienced has been reissued on the prestigious Penguin Essenti